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Coronavirus - Part Two.

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2 minutes ago, RollingJ said:

Makes a little more sense now, so thanks for the clarification, but these restrictions are contained in specific legislation which is reviewed (every 6 months?) or earlier, and should be removed from the statute book in time.

 

 

:) we'll see

2 minutes ago, RollingJ said:

 

 

You are looking at it from your perspective, which is probably a little different to that of many, given your own admitted medical condition, so I will not condemn you for it.

If by 'admitted medical condition' you're referring to me being autistic- in reality, that is a neurological difference, not a 'medical condition'. Not being 'normal' does not make me 'ill'.

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7 minutes ago, onewheeldave said:

By 'zero concerns' I'm referring to my emotional response- I've not had one moment of fear or anxiety about the virus; in contrast I've felt sickened and extremely concerned to watch a population comply with a narrative that has set back our already fragile civil liberties by decades.

 

I've not had covid yet [according to an antibody test], I've not had a vaccine yet either. I still have no concerns about catching covid, and, having almost zero relevant health issues, would expect to not suffer that much if/when I do get it- like the majority who've had it, I'd expect at worst to suffer mild flu-like symptoms.

 

In the unlikely, but possible event, that covid finished me off, to be blunt, having seen what the covid measures have, and will continue to do to many of the most vulnerable in our society, and where this total complience to a bizarre official narrative is going to likely lead, I wouldn't be at all upset; probably better off out of it at this point.

Amen. I totally agree.  I've had Covid and my wife was in hospital for a week. It was thoroughly unpleasant but we both survived... unlike the 18,000  OAP's who died needlessly after being turfed out of hospitals a year ago, and left to die alone in care homes, deprived of medical care and the love of their family. The government's handling of this pandemic has in my opinion been a criminal undertaking from the very beginning and the 130,000 deaths will pale into insignificance when the full death toll from loneliness, mental illness and undiagnosed conditions is finally counted. The coercion  of the masses to submit to largely untested vaccines with unknown long-term consequences will, I am sure, only add to the numbers. I hope one day to see Johnson, Hancock, Gove, Whitty, Valance and the whole pack of miscreants standing in the dock.

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24 minutes ago, onewheeldave said:

:) we'll see

If by 'admitted medical condition' you're referring to me being autistic- in reality, that is a neurological difference, not a 'medical condition'. Not being 'normal' does not make me 'ill'.

My apologies for that, @onewheeldave - I am aware of the difference, with two members of my family being in the same position, and was an error of judgement. It does, however slightly affect how you 'see' things, which is why I accepted that your view was slightly at odds with mine.

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13 minutes ago, Yosemite Sam said:

Amen. I totally agree.  I've had Covid and my wife was in hospital for a week. It was thoroughly unpleasant but we both survived... unlike the 18,000  OAP's who died needlessly after being turfed out of hospitals a year ago, and left to die alone in care homes, deprived of medical care and the love of their family. The government's handling of this pandemic has in my opinion been a criminal undertaking from the very beginning and the 130,000 deaths will pale into insignificance when the full death toll from loneliness, mental illness and undiagnosed conditions is finally counted. The coercion  of the masses to submit to largely untested vaccines with unknown long-term consequences will, I am sure, only add to the numbers. I hope one day to see Johnson, Hancock, Gove, Whitty, Valance and the whole pack of miscreants standing in the dock.

If it wasn't for people like Johnson, Hancock, Gove, Whitty, Valance and the expert advice given leading to action being taken then the likelihood is the NHS would have become overwhelmed meaning your wife may not have been lucky enough to receive hospital treatment for a week.  The people you wish to see standing in the dock collectively may have saved your wife's life.

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Can't agree more with the above post.

This time last year over 1,000 people a day or more were killed with covid on the death certificate for about 17 consecutive days.

This year with better treatments and more importantly the vaccine it's averaging about 40 a day.

As far as I can see from today's news 17 deaths are thought to have a possible cause with the astra vaccine..there has been over 20 million doses of the vaccine given.

 

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29 minutes ago, West 77 said:

If it wasn't for people like Johnson, Hancock, Gove, Whitty, Valance and the expert advice given leading to action being taken then the likelihood is the NHS would have become overwhelmed meaning your wife may not have been lucky enough to receive hospital treatment for a week.  The people you wish to see standing in the dock collectively may have saved your wife's life.

You mean overwhelmed to the extent they'd have had to open up the 30,000 beds in the seven Nightingale Hospitals, set up at a cost of £billions to the taxpayer (all seven now shut down without ever having had the need to open their doors)?

 

I'd say that following that particular "expert advice" was another of the crimes of the country's alleged "leaders", albeit of an economic nature.

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As we have one of the lowest number if beds per 1000 in Europe they had to create more capacity.

You of course want this both ways ,if they had not created capacity to deal with a new unknown disease you would have slammed them for not acting.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

 

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20 minutes ago, Yosemite Sam said:

You mean overwhelmed to the extent they'd have had to open up the 30,000 beds in the seven Nightingale Hospitals, set up at a cost of £billions to the taxpayer (all seven now shut down without ever having had the need to open their doors)?

 

I'd say that following that particular "expert advice" was another of the crimes of the country's alleged "leaders", albeit of an economic nature.

Well maybe they didn't need to open their doors because lockdown measures prevented the current NHS beds from being overwhelmed?

And they were going to be staffed with existing NHS staff on secondment anyway - there's only so thinly a resource can be spread...

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2 minutes ago, Becky B said:

Well maybe they didn't need to open their doors because lockdown measures prevented the current NHS beds from being overwhelmed?

And they were going to be staffed with existing NHS staff on secondment anyway - there's only so thinly a resource can be spread...

Careful, @Becky B - you are using logic where it isn't allowed.🤣

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28 minutes ago, Yosemite Sam said:

You mean overwhelmed to the extent they'd have had to open up the 30,000 beds in the seven Nightingale Hospitals, set up at a cost of £billions to the taxpayer (all seven now shut down without ever having had the need to open their doors)?

 

I'd say that following that particular "expert advice" was another of the crimes of the country's alleged "leaders", albeit of an economic nature.

Billions ?  Anyway, I would have thought that it was a good thing that they never had to be used 

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2 minutes ago, hackey lad said:

Billions ?  Anyway, I would have thought that it was a good thing that they never had to be used 

Blimey they're all coming back!

 

Not enough staff though. Wonderful logistical exercise,  but without the staff, largely pointless. Maybe they could have nightingale schools and spread the kids out a bit in September. All in the past.

 

In other news full capacity at the crucible for the snooker final in may

 

World Snooker Championship 2021: Crucible final to be held at full capacity - https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/snooker/56661944

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, fools said:

Given that most of them had it in the last 2 months, and have got more jabs to go, there's plenty of time for more long-term side effects to appear.

 

You were assured it was safe, had all the tests blah blah, didn't take long for that to unravel

Don't have any jab then.  I don't really think the rest of us are that bothered.  Of course, even though I might be fully vaccinated in a month or so, I could still catch Covid but the chances of me getting seriously ill are greatly diminished but you could still find yourself stood next to me in a shop, so it's you that's at risk. 

 

Feel free to purchase one of the fake Covid certificates that you'll eventually need from the dark web, (while handing over all your details to the mysterious bods at the other end of the keyboard & your cash.  You might get lucky & get a certificate, then again, you might see your bank account emptied before your eyes?), in order to function in the UK come about August. 

 

Remember, a fake Covid certificate or one of those 'I'm exempt from wearing a face mask' fake lanyards bought off the internet, don't offer the same protection as a jab. 

 

Think on! 

Edited by Baron99

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