Jump to content

Apple wins "Slide To Unlock" patent case..


Swampster

Recommended Posts

well thats what they get from copying init...

 

No, it isn't. It's a prime example of why software patents are broken. The patent was awarded in 2011 after being filed by Apple in December 2005, there was a mobile phone which used some form of "slide to unlock" released in March 2005.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, it isn't. It's a prime example of why software patents are broken. The patent was awarded in 2011 after being filed by Apple in December 2005, there was a mobile phone which used some form of "slide to unlock" released in March 2005.

 

I had a Sony Mobile phone. I couldn't tell you the model name but the image below is it

 

http://4photos.net/photosv2/8289_sony_mobile_phone.jpg

 

It had a physical slide button marked "Slide to unlock"

 

So Sony got there first. Do you see Sony suing for it? No because Sony can come up with fresh, new ideas by themselves. Apple can't so they have to steal from others and then claim it as their own.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It had a physical slide button marked "Slide to unlock"

 

So Sony got there first. Do you see Sony suing for it? No because Sony can come up with fresh, new ideas by themselves. Apple can't so they have to steal from others and then claim it as their own.

 

Not, they're not suing as their patent wasn't for physical buttons. They didn't patent the words 'slide' 'to' and 'unlock'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not, they're not suing as their patent wasn't for physical buttons. They didn't patent the words 'slide' 'to' and 'unlock'

 

Another phone, the Neonode N1m, had similar slide to unlock functionality before iPhones existed and Apple applied for their patent - see 9to5mac.com's report. So even if you think taking an existing, very widely used, concept from the physical world and duplicating it's function on a computer in a very obvious way should be patentable, Apple shouldn't have been given the patent because of prior art.

 

The long term impact will be minimal as Google's been given it's own mobile unlocking patent which actually does something more than just replicate an existing concept. I wonder what will happen if Apple tries to implement similar functionality.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.