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Waldo

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About Waldo

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    William Shakespeare (baptised 26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616).
  • Birthday 23/04/1868

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  1. Waldo

    Is gender inequality in sentencing ok?

    Absolutely, differences (psychological and physiological) between individuals are far greater than differences between groups of people. Well, that's my perception at least. I sometimes wonder if (in the western world), men are considered more expendable (of less value) than women. Lighter prison sentences for women. Suicide rate higher for men. Disproportionately less resources (shelters etc) for male victims of domestic abuse. A man's social role, and expectation is for him to provide for women. Custody and access to his child, should he separate from the mother (often courts auto assign custody of children to the mom). If a woman is struggling to cope, she can ask for help. if a man is struggling to cope, and he asks for help, he risks being viewed as not 'manly'. Men are human too, and can be just as fragile as women, but it's not okay for men to be seen as such. It's just not right. Of course, women (esp. in less developed nations) suffer from all kinds of serious discrimination and abuses. That's definitely not right either. I just wished we lived in a world where ALL people were valued just because they're a human being, and not more or less so because of the type or colour of body they inhabit or sexual preference or whatever.
  2. Waldo

    Is gender inequality in sentencing ok?

    Also happy to disagree, For the record, my position is completely at odds with yours. If I was handing out lifeboat places on the Titanic, I would certainly NOT give perfence to women over men (or vice-versa); such pro-women (at the expense of men) attitudes I find quite vile. Sadly, they are also too prevalent.
  3. Waldo

    Is gender inequality in sentencing ok?

    Don't forget that some male individuals are more feminine in nature than the average female; and likewise, some women are more masculine in nature than the average male. Are you proposing we should treat people more or less favourably on the basis of the existence (or not) of dangly bits between the legs, or on the basis of (masculine or feminine) nature? My feeling is that none of that should be accounted for, with regards to sentencing etc. If a person is sentient and aware they're doing wrong (or at least what the law considers wrong, *pffft*), then the body they inhabit shouldn't afford them special privilege. Perhaps their nature should though, but that's more about their general decency and honesty and likelihood of reform etc. It does raise the question though, is a feminine nature innately more valuable or worthy, than a masculine nature?
  4. Waldo

    Is gender inequality in sentencing ok?

    You know, I have a different view on this topic to you Bash Street. I'm totally fine with you (or anyone else) having a difficult view to me. Once upon a time, I'd have totally gotten my knickers in a twist over someone holding an opposing view and not understanding their rational, I think in your case though (based on the first 6 pages of this thread I read though), you're not arriving at your position through a logical rationale, it's more of a gut feel kinda thing? Anyhow.... My position (rightly or wrongly) is people are all equal, and should be afforded no special privileges because of the body they happen to inhabit. At the same time though, people do have different natures, and I think it makes a lot of sense to account for a person's nature when dealing with them. Having said that, I'm asking myself if there is a conflict between the above two statements...
  5. Waldo

    Is gender inequality in sentencing ok?

    @Bash Street You didn't qualify your statement though, you just said locking up a woman is of no benefit to society as a whole. Which obviously includes women who have committed any crime.
  6. Waldo

    Is gender inequality in sentencing ok?

    You can see no benefit to society, by locking up, for example, a female serial killer?
  7. Waldo

    Sheffield Half Marathon 2019

    Well done everyone. Great turn out. Wasn't running myself this year, was just in Dore spectating. Hail and a few flakes of snow at one point; I think the coldest I've ever known it for a Sheffield HM, probably good running conditions though.
  8. Anyone know if there is anything (yet) in the forum rules to bar use of animating gif icons?
  9. Waldo

    Sheffield Half Marathon 2019

    Will be my first time NOT doing Sheffield HM, since 2008! Too many mince pies! Need to get my ass back in to gear, and get ready for the next one.
  10. Waldo

    What is equality to you?

    @Cyclone Well, still waiting to have the points I raised in #240 addressed.... If it's about helping those how lack privilege, why don't we quantify what privilege is, and have schemes designed specifically to help those INDIVIDUALS who lack it? Rather that the assumption that because, say black folk, experience more general predjudice in life we should be running initiatives to get all black people in to work (some of whom may well be far more privileged than some white folk, who will not qualify for such schemes because they're unfortunately white). Doing it that way is innately unfair. You need to assess people on an individual basis, because that's what we are. individuals.
  11. Waldo

    Trading cryptocurrency?

    Honestly wouldn't bother with trading bots, most people I have spoken to consider them a bit of scam.
  12. Waldo

    What is equality to you?

    Yeah, I feel 'snowflake' is also a derogatory term directed exclusively at white people, even the name itself suggests white. As I understand it, a snowflake is someone who objects to what they consider an injustice, that is relatively minor in contrast to the injustices other people have to endure. If that's what snowflake means, then yes, I am doing exactly that, in pointing out I feel 'white privilege' is something of a racial slur. It is a very minor thing of course, but that does not make it right to berate white people; any more than it is to berate non-white people. If people want to ridicule me (not suggesting anyone has) because I feel the term 'white privilege' is somewhat of a slur, feel free. Of course, by objecting to the term itself, I am not denying that the thing described by 'white privilege' exists, or excusing (some) white people's role in creating such a condition in the first place. I am merely applying the same standard to all people, that we all deserve to be treat as individuals and not wholesale tarred by the same brush according to our race. Anyhow, apologies, I seem to be getting off track. If I seem to be missing the point regarding positive action, it's perhaps because I've not applied my attention to it, as yet. Your last paragraph in post #242 Cyclone, I completely agree with.
  13. Waldo

    What is equality to you?

    On average, yes. I would think the average white person is better off than most non-whites. In many instances though, that's not going to be the case. If we accept that non-white people experience more general predjudice in life; that of course is wrong and is something that needs to be addressed. However, I don't see how that in itself justifies letting those people jump the job queue. Maybe there is no logical rational for it; it's just out of some sense of collective guilt or something that white people feel? On the other hand, I would have no problem if help was dished out to people based on individual need (rather than on skin colour, or existence of dangly bits between the legs, or whatever). If based on individual need, some white people would also qualify for help, and some non-white people, would not quality. Not that it matters what I do or don't have a problem with; it's all academic, as I'm not in any position to dictate policy. I also find the term 'white privilege' to be almost a racial slur in itself. It almost suggests that each individual white person is somehow innately racist or guilty of supressing non-white people. What specifically am I doing to merit such a slur? Yeah, I imagine people get defensive because they like to feel they themselves are the architects of their own success; and the fact of the playing field being slanted in their favour, would challange that notion. Maybe I'm getting defensive? I don't know, kinda feels like I'm just trying to articulate where I see injustice.
  14. Waldo

    What is equality to you?

    Thank you Halibut It's an intereting read; and I can well imagine that's the daily experience for a lot of non-white people. It's not right, and people need to challenge the kind of crappy behaviour described in your linked article. In the article, she makes a number of observations, that we could pick apart one by one. She's sharing her own perspective of course; and it's possible there may be instances of unfavourable treatment that she is attributing to racism, where that's not actually the reason. For example, I'm not saying that racism within the work place doesn't happen, but with the boss episode; how does she know her boss was demeaning her because of her race, and not just because she's the new kid and was challenging his authority or opinion? Anyhow, that's beside the point. One thing I'm stuggling with is this... Because of this 'white privilage' thing, we have positive discrimination, aimed at helping only non-whites or non-males etc. Many of whom will be way better off than people who are not eligible for such aid, and who have not engaged in the kind of behaviour described in your article. How do you justify that? The lady (Lori) writing the article; had a pool as a kid, and went to Harvard. Man I could only dream of being so fortunate in life (and it's not for want of trying). I don't think it's right. Neither do I think mis-treatment of, or dehumanising ANY human being is right either.
  15. Waldo

    What is equality to you?

    Yes I have. I am openly discriminated against because I'm white and male. I also suspect that plenty of people dislike me, and act unfavourably towards me, precisly because of my skin colour and gender; at least that's been my experience.
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