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King Edwards Hospital, 1965

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I was under Prof Sharrad from 1958 to the mid '60s. I was born in '58 and at 3 months was diagnosed with spinal scoliosis. My mum told me that the first doctor I saw told mum that I would be a vegetable and that she should have me instutionalised and forget about me. Poor mum. Thankfully she wasn't going to give up her first born and demanded to see another doctor. The other doctor turned out to be Prof Sharrad. From 15months to 5 years of age I wore a Milwaukee brace which I hated. I remember hating the brace and anyone I associated with it. I had a fine pair of lungs which I exercised at every hospital visit. Prof Sharrod had the patience of a saint and waited patiently until I had tired myself out. Mum later told me that he often had stern words for her as he thought she was spoiling me by trying to appease me with treats when I had a temper tantrum!

 

After Prof Sharrad I saw Mr Evans at the Royal Infirmary. I was admitted to King Eds in February 1969 and was in and out until the summer of 1970. I had a metal rod fixed to my spine. In preparation for that I was stretched and put in plaster of paris body casts. Over several months I was stretched 3 inches. After the op I was bedridden for 3 months. As well as Mr Evans I saw Mr Baker who was a Canadian doctor.

 

I was back in King Eds in the spring of '73 as the rod had broken and it was going to be changed. I was on a mixed ward. A boy on the ward died of viral pnumonia which I caught. I was taken to the isolation ward at Lodge Moor. As I recovered I was allowed to walk around the unit. I remember seeing someone in an iron lung and waving at them through the glass wall.

 

I cannot remember any other names but I am always grateful for the doctors, nurses and auxillary staff who looked after me. I'm sure that nurses today would be horrified at the working conditions (and uniforms) the nurses in the 60's worked under.

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I have many fond associations of king teds though i was never a patient there. my next door neighbour Clarice Wragg and my gran Ada Glossop were domestics there in the 70,s and my wife started her nurse training there.

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What a great thread. How much we owe to the pioneers of medicine like Prof. Sharrard and his colleagues. These are the people that truly deserved some sort of public recognition.

I often biked down to King Edwards hospital-and beyond. It must have been an epic journey for families on the No. 2 bus all those years ago.

I must make a visit to that part of Sheffield when I am next there.

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i had a brother who spent a of time in this hospital he got polio when he was 18 months old he was born in 1959 his name was David Thomas sadley he passed away last year age 49

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Dr Hertzog died a few years ago. I read somewhere he wrote a book on the history of Rivilin Hospital. I was in Rivilin when he first started, taking over from Dr Patterson.

 

My Dr, was Mr, Pappworth.

 

Dr. Herzog was my father-in-law. He wrote a history of Rivelin, which I have. I would be interested in any stories you might have about him.

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The German-born Dr Eric Herzog was medical superintendent at King Edward's Hospital from 1952 to 1972. He died in Manchester, aged 90, in February 1997 - he was a fine doctor. His friend Prof. William Sharrard died, aged, 80 in 2001 - another fine orthopaedic surgeon. He did a grand job after my 1972 motorbike accident - three months in the Infirmary and a few weeks in a caliper and I was OK again.

 

Erich Herzog was my father-in-law. Did you come to his funeral? I remember someone who had been in a bike accident. My e-mail peter.of.dean@gmail.com.

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Hi peterjohn - no, I wasn't able to attend the funeral but I heard he had died from my former GP Dr Jack Ridgwick who knew Dr Herzog. The tributes to Eric Herzog and William Sharrard on this thread are a measure of what fine doctors they were.

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all these posts bring back such fantastically happy memoreies I did my ortopaedic certificate at king teds I was there from 1963 to 65 and loved every minute of it The work was hard but the patients were fantastic and made it all worth while I met and married my husband Michael Kelly (if anyone remembers him) He was quite a charachter and went on to win many medals at the paraplegic olympics and after retiring from sport spent endless hours trying to raise money for chronically sick and disabled kids I lost Mike last year and life is extremely empty without him I would love to hear from anyone who remembers him and me as well My maiden name was Hewitt

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Last week I saw an neuro specialist at Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge about my sciatica. We talked about my scoliosis and the treatment I received at The Children's Hospital and King Edwards in 1969. I had a harrington rod inserted in an attempt to straighten my spine. I knew that the treatment and operation was experimental. It brought a lump to my throat to hear the neuro specialist talking about the pioneering treatments at King Edwards and how much medical science learnt.

Edited by chimay

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all these posts bring back such fantastically happy memoreies I did my ortopaedic certificate at king teds I was there from 1963 to 65 and loved every minute of it The work was hard but the patients were fantastic and made it all worth while I met and married my husband Michael Kelly (if anyone remembers him) He was quite a charachter and went on to win many medals at the paraplegic olympics and after retiring from sport spent endless hours trying to raise money for chronically sick and disabled kids I lost Mike last year and life is extremely empty without him I would love to hear from anyone who remembers him and me as well My maiden name was Hewitt

 

i remember him a great character he was my dad to does that mean your my mum ha ha hello

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Regarding the book that was written by Mr hertzog Can anyone tell me where I can get it as I would love to read it I worked with Mr hertzog during my orthopaedic training and he was always our mentor We all used to call him Poppa as he treated us like his own What a wonderful man he was When he lived in the bungalow at the hospital he often used to invite some of the students for an evening of reminiscing with his wife and himself It was fabulous so I would dearly love to read his book

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Dr. Herzog was my father-in-law. He wrote a history of Rivelin, which I have. I would be interested in any stories you might have about him.

 

my brother ron was at rivelin for a long time ,in the 50s TB hip .HERZOG ringsa bell

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