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Etiquette on overhanging branches


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We have a tree, with blossom. It has had a growth spurt and wandered over to fence to the neighbours, where it is depositing blossom.

 

It would be a pain to prune from our side, plus the branches would fall on their side. Is it considered neighbourly to go round and say 'What ho, I notice my tree is getting a tad pally with your garden, what say I nip over and chop it back?'?

 

Do I have to pick up all the blossom that falls off during the pruning? Or just the branches?

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I think it would be extremely neighbourly of you. Although I wouldn't mind a blossom tree peeking over the boundary at all. However, if it was leylandii or a sycamore, totally different story :D

 

You're supposed to take away the branches, or if they pruned it, they're supposed to give them back, especially if they have fruit on them.

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Legally, your neighbour has a right to chop down any branches that overhang his garden if he doesn't want them to, but he is obliged to return the branches to you as they don't belong to him.

 

Asking him if he wants you to cut them back, or is happy to have them overhanging, is certainly the friendliest way to tackle the issue. You might find that he thinks it's a nice addition to his garden, and unless he's a complete misanthrope he will at least be pleased that you offered to sort it out for him.

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Guest sibon

Wait until you see them and let them know that you are happy to prune the tree if it is a problem to them.

 

As Ruby says, they will probably like it anyway.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So just to build on this, is there any reason I can't trim the branches (which I would have to do by standing on the neighbour's property)?

 

Technically the path is shared access, though they built a fence so it all falls on their side.

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you have right of access to maintain a boundary (though a tree isn't a boundary, usually). If it's only overhanging the shared path, you don't have to ask them for permission to access, but I can't see the point in pruning a tree that isn't bothering them. Just ask if they're okay with its growth next time you see them in the garden or street

 

I'd check your deeds over their placement of that fence too. That could get messy in the future :suspect:

 

Do you have right of access on their land, or is it actually shared ownership?

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So just to build on this, is there any reason I can't trim the branches (which I would have to do by standing on the neighbour's property)?

 

Technically the path is shared access, though they built a fence so it all falls on their side.

 

If your neighbour doesn't want you to stand on their property then you shouldn't.

 

Why not just knock on their door & ask?

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If your neighbour doesn't want you to stand on their property then you shouldn't.

 

Why not just knock on their door & ask?

 

Because they are never in, I tend to only see them if they want to complain about some imaginary slight.

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