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The new school lunch laws for September!

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I can see both sides personally growing up with 2 heavily obese brothers.

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I am aware of Education Regulations that passed into law concerning what must and must not be served up for School Dinners.

 

I am also aware of guidelines that recommend how school policies should address the contents of packed lunches.

 

I am not aware of guidelines on packed lunches having become "law".

 

Has a new "law" actually been passed?

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Well I'm all for it.

I don't see how teachers can be expected to educate children about healthy food in PHSE lessons if five minutes later the kids are buying chips and pop from the canteen.

You think their work will suffer from not eating?

Think about how junk affect their behaviour and learning...

I think canteen should serve healthy food, it can taste nice believe it or not..;

But I disagree with confiscating junk food brought to school from home.

Indeed, school can inform parents in letters and explain that they'd rather kids didn't bring junk from home, but that's about it.

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BANNED are cereal bars,fruit flakes,cordial,flavoured water
Struggling to find the problem with these? I can understand about banning food which is high in fat (as part of initiative for tackling obesity) but surely cereal bars and fruit flakes are ok? And flavoured water??? Surely that's a massive improvement on a can of coke??

 

I understand the principle behind the whole thing, but just think banning such items is going a little too far.

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No school should be serving up junk day in and day out though a once a week chips/pizza treat is fine on the menu - all we had at our school was greasy muck and I used to have no dinner most days because greasy stuff always has made me feel ill. But as for what children have in their lunchboxes, confiscating food is going way, way too far. Children do still belong to their parents funnily enough, and a packed lunch has always been one way that individual needs and tastes can be catered for. There's too much interfering at times. Parents have enough info to know what's good and what's bad - leave it to them to gradually catch up on this.

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Well I know that marlcliffe primary do their own catering and its all good healthy stuff, has been for well over a year. I have no objection to healthy eating in schools, but can't see what they are going to do to stop lunchboxes being filled with a cheese string or some flavoured water.

 

Like I said, are they going to feed the kids for free if they confiscate their lunch? They can't let them go hungry!

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I wish to ask the question what "LAW" states this and a link would be the way to go.

Is this only applied to one particular school and it it forms part of that schools rules, I find it hard to believe that a "LAW" as been passed without some form of discussion in the public domain

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I am aware of Education Regulations that passed into law concerning what must and must not be served up for School Dinners.

 

I am also aware of guidelines that recommend how school policies should address the contents of packed lunches.

 

I am not aware of guidelines on packed lunches having become "law".

 

Has a new "law" actually been passed?

 

No - no new law about lunchbox contents - only guidelines - which I may well choose to ignore.

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Cheers for that link. The pdf file (http://www.schoolfoodtrust.org.uk/UploadDocs/Library/Documents/School-food-trust.pdf page 28 ) there clarified that the OP had misinterpreted the story. The only packed lunches which fall under the ruling are those provided by the school or school caterer. If you send your kid to school with sausage rolls, mars bar and a pack of ready salted, then that is your choice and the school will not take it away.

 

The idea behind the moves is a good one - how many parents like their children to eat well at home, and hope they eat well at school only to find they thrive off a diet of burgers and chips? I, for one, welcome the moves and am glad that my son loves diversity in meals (our freezer is bare 90% of the time - I prefer to cook a nice meal from scratch) as he will enjoy whatever is presented on a plate to him.

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I am aware that there are schools adopting this policy throughout the country but am pretty sure that it's not the 'law'.

 

While I agree that we should be feeding our children as healthy a diet as possible I don't think that this is the way to do it.

 

Who will police it? I would have thought that dinner ladies had enough to do.

 

What happens if food is confiscated? Child goes hungry? Child feels like an outcast? Child made to feel that they have bad parents?

 

Will this apply to teachers lunch boxes too? They are after all role models.

 

Will this really alter eating habits when the child still goes home to burgers/pizza/chips/ etc night after night?

 

Bad idea!

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Whilst there may or may not be any new law, there are certainly guidelines for schools and school policies that have to be adhered to.

 

These have been going on for some time already regarding the contents of 'home-packed' lunches.

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