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Tintin book to be banned

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The CRE really scored an own goal with this one, ever since this controversy has been publicised, sales of the book have shot up. Well done Mr phillips give yourself a pat on the back!

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It's a bit silly.

 

They will be banning The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe next for being faunist and insighting half man/half goat hate crimes.

 

bill hicks will be p****** at that,

I ain't scared of you goat boy, you big ole hairy stinky thing.

goatboy!NOOoooo...

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just as an aside, doe's any one know if the cre has or is planning to ban the sale of copies of agatha christies novel "ten little *******" ? ...

 

 

Already been done!!!

 

"In 1939 mystery lovers eagerly awaited the publication of Agatha Christie’s new novel, Ten Little Indians. They were not disappointed. The novel soon became a best-seller, gaining critical success along with its popularity. First published in England as Ten Little *******, the book was renamed And Then There Were None, from the closing line of the nursery rhyme, for publication in the United States. The original title was deemed too offensive for the American public. Later, the title would be changed to Ten Little Indians."

 

I suppose it's a good job the Americans didn't change their title to Ten Little Indians, or it would probably now be Ten Little Native Americans.

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Has anyone ever stop to consider why it was banned, and what was being banned, rather than very readily jump onto the bandwagon and say that this is a typical "PC issue"?

 

I was in Brussels for a few days when the BBC World covered this story. I am sure that TinTin books are reverred and held in high regards in Belgium, and the country actually have the context somewhat right. TinTin was created at a time which reflected the time that it stood for. To use cartoons as a way to make a point, which otherwise was not really polite to do so, in Belgium. When you take such a book out of the context and audience that it was meant for, it means something totally different altogether.

 

I do think that there is such a thing as cultural differences, and to rename something to sell it in a better is indeed not nonsense. If we indeed are that desensitized and truly that open-minded, then why do we not see beers labelled "Moany Gits" ? Cos it is true, and we do moan, and it is factual. :rolleyes: Is our sense of humour that high that we will allow such a beer to be labelled and marketed in the UK?

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Has anyone ever stop to consider why it was banned, and what was being banned, rather than very readily jump onto the bandwagon and say that this is a typical "PC issue"?

 

I was in Brussels for a few days when the BBC World covered this story. I am sure that TinTin books are reverred and held in high regards in Belgium, and the country actually have the context somewhat right. TinTin was created at a time which reflected the time that it stood for. To use cartoons as a way to make a point, which otherwise was not really polite to do so, in Belgium. When you take such a book out of the context and audience that it was meant for, it means something totally different altogether.

 

I do think that there is such a thing as cultural differences, and to rename something to sell it in a better is indeed not nonsense. If we indeed are that desensitized and truly that open-minded, then why do we not see beers labelled "Moany Gits" ? Cos it is true, and we do moan, and it is factual. :rolleyes: Is our sense of humour that high that we will allow such a beer to be labelled and marketed in the UK?

 

Thats not the point. Censoring or changing someones art or intellectual property is wrong no matter how offensive it is.

Just because it might seem offensive to a minority of people today doens't mean we should change it to protect our poor little eyes from reading such nasty words. We should, if anything, use it to look back at history and marvel at how wonderful and civilised our society is today...:rolleyes:

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Has anyone ever stop to consider why it was banned, and what was being banned, rather than very readily jump onto the bandwagon and say that this is a typical "PC issue"?

 

I was in Brussels for a few days when the BBC World covered this story. I am sure that TinTin books are reverred and held in high regards in Belgium, and the country actually have the context somewhat right. TinTin was created at a time which reflected the time that it stood for. To use cartoons as a way to make a point, which otherwise was not really polite to do so, in Belgium. When you take such a book out of the context and audience that it was meant for, it means something totally different altogether.

 

I do think that there is such a thing as cultural differences, and to rename something to sell it in a better is indeed not nonsense. If we indeed are that desensitized and truly that open-minded, then why do we not see beers labelled "Moany Gits" ? Cos it is true, and we do moan, and it is factual. :rolleyes: Is our sense of humour that high that we will allow such a beer to be labelled and marketed in the UK?

 

Well we have "Old Fart" wine, so I suppose we would.

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Thats not the point. Censoring or changing someones art or intellectual property is wrong no matter how offensive it is.

Just because it might seem offensive to a minority of people today doens't mean we should change it to protect our poor little eyes from reading such nasty words. We should, if anything, use it to look back at history and marvel at how wonderful and civilised our society is today...:rolleyes:

Well, censorship has a place in society. It is a kind of moral standard in a way, and QA control even. I mean, we have that in our drugs, and we upheld that strictly. So why shouldn't we have a standard of how people treat each other with? It shouldn't be controlled so strictly, this is true, but however, neither should materials to be supported in a way which degrade others, right? I understand that the cartoon format was used years ago because there were indeed a lot of controversial subjects which a lot of the TinTin stories cover.

 

I agree that the work should not be changed, but preserved, but it does not mean that it should indeed be on sales in this day and age though either. If the publishers want to sell the books anyway, then it is down to them to market it in a way which is acceptable to the country that they are trying to sell in. A lot consumer products are like that anyway. It finds the relevancy and try to sell it in a way which is widely accepted. If it tries to sell it as a controversial book, then shouldn't it be marketed it as such, or at least have disclaimer cause on its covers at least? You say that it is only a few which finds it offensive, are you sure about this? If it is, then why would CRE kick up such a fuss?

 

Some books may not be in circulation for a good reason, but it does not mean that it cannot have a place on the shelf of a library. I can't remember which book went down a similar route in recent years. The vulgar level was higher than the average person can take, and it was banned. It stopped production. A few got the few copies which came out from the first batch in circulation, after that, it was withdrawn if I remember correctly.

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Well we have "Old Fart" wine, so I suppose we would.

There is also another bottle of wine with the word "git" in it, which comes out in circulation every once a while as a gimmicky Christmas product. I've seen this around before. I doubt that such items will be marketed as mainstream items for daily consumptions though. I have no doubt that it won't be accepted widely, is the point I'm trying to make. Marketing do work, and for a good reason sometimes.

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There is also another bottle of wine with the word "git" in it, which comes out in circulation every once a while as a gimmicky Christmas product. I've seen this around before. I doubt that such items will be marketed as mainstream items for daily consumptions though. I have no doubt that it won't be accepted widely, is the point I'm trying to make. Marketing do work, and for a good reason sometimes.

 

I look forward to having a bottle of "Old Git" as a Christmas present from each of my children, if it's still available. :)

 

I believe in calling " a spade a spade"! Oops, what have I said? The "Thought Police" will be after me now for posting that remark! :hihi:

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Similarly they could present me with a pack of cards, with Clubs, Diamonds, Hearts and Spades in the pack, plus of course "Queens" of each included in the pack. :hihi:

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There is also another bottle of wine with the word "git" in it, which comes out in circulation every once a while as a gimmicky Christmas product. I've seen this around before. I doubt that such items will be marketed as mainstream items for daily consumptions though. I have no doubt that it won't be accepted widely, is the point I'm trying to make. Marketing do work, and for a good reason sometimes.

 

Actually, I was confusing Old Fart ale, with Old Git wine!

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