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Why do people with babies think it's OK to use disabled toilets?

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I have to ask myself a question....you have no kids right? so what the hell were you doing in a baby changing room....Hhhhmmmmmmm, hypocrit springs to mind :huh:

 

And to TBH disabled people these days get right on my ..... you don't want to be stared at, why - cos you're no different to anyone else, so why can't you just wait then,SAME AS EVERYONE ELSE

 

Do you read the Daily Mail or the Guardian by any chance? They all hate us as well! :loopy::rant:

 

People who hate the disabled seriously need to shut up IMO.

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I think you might be teetering on the edge of incitment to the hatred of a minority group here tom.

Can you expand on what you mean by 'some disabled people being impatient', and that 'they have all the time in the world as they don't work'?

 

Within any group of people, be they black, white, disabled or able bodied, there will always be the odd cantankerous ones, and im sure many of us have come across him or her on our travels, i certainly have.

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Within any group of people, be they black, white, disabled or able bodied, there will always be the odd cantankerous ones, and im sure many of us have come across him or her on our travels, i certainly have.

 

Exactly Mr C.

It seems to be the case that some folk can't even work out why a disabled toilet differs from an ordinary one.

So just for those who NEED A LITTLE HELP. The first and most important difference is that a toilet for disabled people is BIGGER than standard - so that manouvering a chair/scooter is possible.

Another difference is that there are grab rails and modifications to the 'chain'..

 

I think tom 30 should do a bit of research re employment amongst disabled people. He seems to think that 'they' have nothing to do except whinge.

He might just be surprised.

 

As for you Ricon - I hate being stared at and I'm not disabled.

But if anyone does stare at me I expect them to nod or say hello - same as anyone else - including disabled people.

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Indeed, I have aspergers syndrome which is a mild form of autism, and I know it as fact that above 90% of young adults with autism and/or aspergers are unemployed due to lack of knowledge/understanding from the world of for want of a better word, "normal" society about the condition.

 

Things are slowly improving thanks to the work of such as the Supported Employment Project at The Source near Meadowhall but it's still an issue that the Government needs to be made aware of IMO.

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Exactly Mr C.

It seems to be the case that some folk can't even work out why a disabled toilet differs from an ordinary one.

So just for those who NEED A LITTLE HELP. The first and most important difference is that a toilet for disabled people is BIGGER than standard - so that manouvering a chair/scooter is possible.

Another difference is that there are grab rails and modifications to the 'chain'..

 

I think tom 30 should do a bit of research re employment amongst disabled people. He seems to think that 'they' have nothing to do except whinge.

He might just be surprised.

 

I would still use a toilet designed for the disabled if i was desperate though.

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Indeed, I have aspergers syndrome which is a mild form of autism, and I know it as fact that above 90% of young adults with autism and/or aspergers are unemployed due to lack of knowledge/understanding from the world of for want of a better word, "normal" society about the condition.

 

Things are slowly improving thanks to the work of such as the Supported Employment Project at The Source near Meadowhall but it's still an issue that the Government needs to be made aware of IMO.

why do you need a disabled toilet if you have that condition?

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I would still use a toilet designed for the disabled if i was desperate though.

 

SO YOUR USERNAME IS NOT TOO APPROPRIATE Mr C is it then?!!

 

But that's not what the thread is about. Mums can use baby changing facilities in ANY loo - we're not talking a two minute pee here are we? We're talking a ten minute nappy change.

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SO YOUR USERNAME IS NOT TOO APPROPRIATE Mr C is it then?!!

 

But that's not what the thread is about. Mums can use baby changing facilities in ANY loo - we're not talking a two minute pee here are we? We're talking a ten minute nappy change.

 

:hihi:Since when has a thread stayed on topic, and who is to say im not a dad with young children and have to use the disabled facilities, dads do take kids out.

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Now then, I fully understand that going about your business as a disabled person poses challenges. My mum has a very close friend who is in a wheelchair so I know from outings with her how useful disabled parking spaces ect can be.

 

But I also think that if disabled people expect to be shown consideration then they should extend similar consideration to others. We live in an age of equality, so disabled people can't have it all ways. We all have to wait in a toilet queue occasionally, and yes it's annoying when you're desperate, but that's life. I'm really shocked that the OP could be so narrow-minded as to begrudge the use of the disabled loo to a mum struggling with small children and a push chair, just so her mother can enjoy the luxury of an immediate wee! Surely they could wait at the door for two minutes like the rest of us often have to do in public toilets.

 

If we really want to stamp out disability discrimination then I think it needs to come from both sides. I'm often slowed down as I go about my business by ending up stuck behind a wheel chair or a person walking slowly with sticks. Do I shove them out of the way? No. Do I begrudge them for taking their time? Of course not. So I would hope that they would show similar consideration towards me.

 

And for the record, yes I would use the disabled toilet if I was desperate, the other's were engaged and there was no disabled person in sight. I would do so quickly, and I would expect to be shown consideration by any disabled person who happened to arrive outside the cubicle within the two minutes I was using it.

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why do you need a disabled toilet if you have that condition?

 

Because I am physically disabled as well, not wheelchair bound but still entitled to use disabled toilet facilities.

 

Also, teh disabled facilities tend to be cleaner and my hygienic than teh able bodied ones.

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Now then, I fully understand that going about your business as a disabled person poses challenges. My mum has a very close friend who is in a wheelchair so I know from outings with her how useful disabled parking spaces ect can be.

 

But I also think that if disabled people expect to be shown consideration then they should extend similar consideration to others. We live in an age of equality, so disabled people can't have it all ways. We all have to wait in a toilet queue occasionally, and yes it's annoying when you're desperate, but that's life. I'm really shocked that the OP could be so narrow-minded as to begrudge the use of the disabled loo to a mum struggling with small children and a push chair, just so her mother can enjoy the luxury of an immediate wee! Surely they could wait at the door for two minutes like the rest of us often have to do in public toilets.

 

If we really want to stamp out disability discrimination then I think it needs to come from both sides. I'm often slowed down as I go about my business by ending up stuck behind a wheel chair or a person walking slowly with sticks. Do I shove them out of the way? No. Do I begrudge them for taking their time? Of course not. So I would hope that they would show similar consideration towards me.

 

And for the record, yes I would use the disabled toilet if I was desperate, the other's were engaged and there was no disabled person in sight. I would do so quickly, and I would expect to be shown consideration by any disabled person who happened to arrive outside the cubicle within the two minutes I was using it.

 

So basically you think that ending discrimination can be achieved by you ignoring that facilities are provided for disabled people and using them yourself because it's more convenient. And you justify it by not pushing over slow moving disabled people when out walking....

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why is it that SOME disabled people,not all,think that they are above everyone else?...it is the same in car parks,when the disabled spaces are taken up they park in parent/baby spaces,they must think their need is greater than the parents with small children.if all the parent/baby spaces are taken up i wouldnt dream of parking in a disabled spot.......maybe i should try it and see what happens.......uproar i can bet!

The reason people use disabled parking spots, is if they have a wheel chair, its a tad difficult opening the door to help someone out and into a chair in an ordinary parking space, just common sense to be honest:) Thats why some folks use mother and baby spots if some kind person has taken all the disabled places

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