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Tinsley Marshalling Yard

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Tinsley Marshalling Yard never had a heyday!

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As far as I can remember, TMY never reached 50% of its working capacity. The brains behind it all, were busy trying to find a new site before the yard was officially opened. I've forgotten where the new site is (or was). I lived at Catcliffe during the time when it was being built.

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And to think I remember it as a stretch of derelict land to the West of the old Sheffield and District line.

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Billy, There is a book called Rail Centers Sheffield by Stephen R Batty published in 1984 isbn no 0 7110 1366 7. There are a few decent pics in there. If I had a scanner I would have had a go at uploading them. Good luck with your search.

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Thanks Blue I really appreciate you trying to help, I'm going to try and buy the book. Just tried the online Rotherham library catalogue but they haven't got it.

Edited by Billy24

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Hi all,

 

I'm looking for old pictures of Tinsley Marshalling Yard when it was in its heyday and wonder if any of you can point me to a suitable website where I could find some.

 

Even better would be to have some kind soul email me some if they happen to have have any. I really would be very grateful as I am making a short film and am short of photo material.

 

My interest is because I grew up right next to it but never thought to take any pictures of it, at its height the yard was a wonderment of technology for the time.

 

Can anyone please help.

The yard had an interesting way of separating the stock .As they shunted the unconnected wagons up a ramp,a code for destination was typed into a machine which then operated the points to suit .

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I've got some from 1969. One from above and one from inside the control tower. PM me if still interested.

 

The Dok

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Hi all,

 

I'm looking for old pictures of Tinsley Marshalling Yard when it was in its heyday and wonder if any of you can point me to a suitable website where I could find some.

 

Even better would be to have some kind soul email me some if they happen to have have any. I really would be very grateful as I am making a short film and am short of photo material.

 

My interest is because I grew up right next to it but never thought to take any pictures of it, at its height the yard was a wonderment of technology for the time.

 

Can anyone please help.

The yard had an interesting way of separating the stock .As they shunted the unconnected wagons up a ramp,a code for destination was typed into a machine which then operated the points to suit .

 

The system was known as Hump Shunting and the point operation was done by a method called dalty (or summat simular) hydrolic pistons were used to slow the wagons down after they had been shunted on to a siding.

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I remember watching hump shunting at Tinsley in 1966-67 - it was fascinating. The unique (?) feature of hump shunting at Tinsley was the coupled "master and slave" shunting units, each of which was made up at Darlington Works from two 0-6-0 shunters, specially weighted, with only one cab, in the "master". There was an article in "Modern Railways" about them; they had a very accurate speedometer, so that the driver could push the train of wagons up the hump at just the right speed. But then, as groups of wagons went down the slope you could hear the "bang-bang-bang" of the retarders, slowing them to the right speed for whichever siding they were destined for. The three "master and slave" units were numbered:

 

D4500 - made up from from D4188 + D3698

D4501 - made up from from D4190 + D4189

D4502 - made up from from D4187 + D3697

 

In each case the first number was the "master". Here is a photo:

 

http://www.therailwaycentre.com/Pages%20Loco/Recognition%20loco/Illus_13.html

Edited by hillsbro
Speling...

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I remember watching hump shunting at Tinsley in 1966-67 - it was fascinating. The unique (?) feature of hump shunting at Tinsley was the coupled "master and slave" shunting units, each of which was made up at Darlington Works from two 0-6-0 shunters, specially weighted, with only one cab, in the "master". There was an article in "Modern Railways" about them; they had a very accurate speedometer, so that the driver could push the train of wagons up the hump at just the right speed. But then, as groups of wagons went down the slope you could hear the "bang-bang-bang" of the retarders, slowing them to the right speed for whichever siding they were destined for. The three "master and slave" units were numbered:

 

D4500 - made up from from D4188 + D3698

D4501 - made up from from D4190 + D4189

D4502 - made up from from D4187 + D3697

 

In each case the furst number was the "master". Here is a photo:

 

http://www.therailwaycentre.com/Pages%20Loco/Recognition%20loco/Illus_13.html

 

The input codes for the points setting were controlled by modified add listing office equipment machines made by a swedish company called Addo.Has anybody got any pictures of them?

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