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Old Sheffield trams

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I have tried to look this up online, but no joy. Does anyone know why the old tram system was scrapped?

Is there any chance it could be reinstated?

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I have tried to look this up online, but no joy. Does anyone know why the old tram system was scrapped?

Is there any chance it could be reinstated?

 

It was a thing called progress,sadly a lot of the lines have just been uncovered and ripped up on shalesmoor and spital hill.

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I have tried to look this up online, but no joy. Does anyone know why the old tram system was scrapped?

Is there any chance it could be reinstated?

 

I think 1960s the system was scrapped, Plain Talker would know better.

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I have tried to look this up online, but no joy. Does anyone know why the old tram system was scrapped?

Is there any chance it could be reinstated?

You need to speak to my dad he is a expert on tramways especialy sheffield trams. Problem his he isn't on line.:(

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I bought a book a couple of years ago called "Sheffield In The Age Of The Tram" from Waterstone's in Orchard Square, which covers the period 1950-1960 (when the network closed, the last one in England apart from Blackpool) and is full of period photographs - fascinating to see how much some parts of town have changed while some hardly seem to have changed at all.

 

The reason for trams going out of favour was due largely to technical improvements in the design of motor buses, such as proper suspension, heating, padded seats etc. Plus a bus can be diverted, can be overtaken if they break down and don't require miles and miles of expensive trackwork and high-voltage overhead wires. In those days global warming, air pollution and traffic congestion had yet to become issues...

 

Sadly, save for the odd rusty catenary pole here and there, just about all of the old network's infrastructure has since been either ripped up or buried under road resurfacing schemes.

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Or under the grass reservation down the centre of Prince of Wales Rd. I remember seeing the tramtracks ripped up on Abbeydale Rd in the late 60s.

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Our 'band' were playing a gig on Snig Hill (Maybe Cockaynes) 1960 or 61. A firemens' ball in fact. Saw the last tram go off towards Heeley about 10.15 Saturday night. End of an era.

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The Sheffield Corporation (Sheffield City Council) took over the tramway system in July 1896. The Corporation's goal was to expand and mechanise the system. Almost immediately a committee was formed to inspect other tramway systems to look at the improved systems of traction. Upon their return the committee recommended the adoption of electrical propulsion using the overhead current collection system.

 

The national grid was not as developed as it is now and so the Corporation set out to provide the required current. The Corporation were to become their local domestic and industrial electricity supplier were the additional load would be sold. A power station was built for the Sheffield Corporation Tramways on Kelham Island by the river Don between Mowbray Street and Alma Street. Feeder cables stretched from there to the extremeties of the system, covering over forty miles of route.

 

Over the years eight depots were built throughout the city to service a fleet of about 400 trams.

 

Tinsley tram depot was built in 1874 and was the first depot built in Sheffield for the "Sheffield Tramways Company". It was originally built for horse trams but was converted for electric trams in 1898–1899 after which it was capable of accommodating 95 tram cars. Following the abandonment of the tramway system in 1960, the Tinsley depot was sold and was subsequently used as a warehouse. Much of the original 1874 building still exists and the entire depot is listed as a historically significant building. The Sheffield Bus Museum Trust has used part of the depot as a museum since May 1987.

 

Heeley tram depot (53°21′31.5″N, 1°28′28″W) was the depot for horse trams only, the line to it was never electrified. The depot was built by the Sheffield Tramways company in 1878. When the tram system was abandoned in 1960, the depot was sold and subsequently used as a car repair shop until 2005. The building has been sold and flats will be built incorporating the structure, as it is a listed building

 

A small tram shed was built at the Nether Edge terminus , which opened in 1899. The Nether Edge line as well as two other small sections was abandoned due to the narrowness of the streets the tram travelled on. This caused problems and was unsuitable for efficient service. The Sheffield Corporation concluded that trams were better for city service.

 

The Queens Road works opened in 1905. Many of the trams used on the Sheffield tramway were built at Queens Road. The building survived for many years following abandonment, but was demolished in the 1990s.

 

Construction of the Shoreham Street depot started in about 1910 on the site of an 18th century leadmill. Following the abandonment of the tramway the depot was used as a bus garage for many years until it finally closed in the 1990s. Much of the building has since been demolished and redeveloped as student flats, although those parts that surround the entrance at the junction of Shoreham Street and Leadmill Road are still standing and in good condition.

 

The Crookes depot, which was located on Pickmere Road , was started in 1914, but not completed until 1919. It closed on 5 May 1957 and has since been demolished.

 

The Tenter Street depot opened in 1928 and was the last tram depot to remain in operational use. As well as the tram depot there was a bus garage on the upper level that was accessed from Hawley Street.

 

The depot at Holme Lane closed on 23 April 1954. The facade of the building still stands, although the rest of the building has been demolished and a medical centre built in its place.

 

There are few remnants of the, once extensive, tramway. The tram sheds at Tinsley and Heeley survive, as do parts of those at Holme Lane and Shoreham Street. In many places the tram tracks were not removed, the road was resurfaced over the tracks, and the tracks still survive (albeit covered). An example of tracks covered in this way was uncovered and made a feature of The Moor pedestrian precinct. Around the City there are about ten or so of the "overhead" poles still standing(2006), such as the matching pair in Firth Park, where you can also see a small section of track in the middle of the traffic island. Poles also survive at Manor Top, Woodseats and Abbeydale Road. In places where the trams ran on a reserved track, such as on Abbeydale Road South and Abbey Lane at Beauchief, the reservation has been converted into a dual carriage-way.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheffield_Tramway#The_electric_tram_era

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I have never seen the old trams in Sheffield only the current old trams in Blackpool which are thought were great even if bumpy & old but really add a lot of character to the town. I presume the ones in Sheffield were very similar & would love to see them so if anyone can find any links as I can't that would be most appreciated.

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