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Motorcycle shops in 70's Sheffield

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was it grays on west street that sold there bikes in guineas

didnt think chalie was killed,racing ?

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I also liked BMW's - I never rode one but my dad did. He told me that the engine-speed clutch took some getting used to but it was a fine machine. There's an elderly chap on Loxley Road who (I think) still runs his 1940s Scott Squirrel.

 

 

 

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The elderly chap is called Jack Toseland and he is a good friend of mine,he has sold all his bikes because of ill health.Jack is very well known and liked by fellow old bike enthusiasts.

 

---------- Post added 23-07-2014 at 09:39 ----------

 

was it grays on west street that sold there bikes in guineas

didnt think chalie was killed,racing ?

Grays always bought in pounds and sold in Guineas.Charlie died from being old it was Billy Nelson his passenger who was killed in a solo race.

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Can anyone remember the motorcycle shops around Sheffield in the mid to late seventies?

I can remember Cooks on West Street but I am trying to remember who had it before them.

 

Grays on Bridge St opposite the old Bus Station spent some time looking their big Window when I was a kid

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Grays on Bridge St opposite the old Bus Station spent some time looking their big Window when I was a kid
So did I - and often went in and sat on the bikes (vroom, vroom....). But Leather & Simpson were a better firm to deal with. Gray's moved to West Street in c. 1969; their showroom there seemed much smaller and I don't know what eventually became of the firm. I do remember in 1972 seeing a year-old BSA 441cc Shooting Star in Gray's, priced I think at 229 (guineas of course) and was almost tempted, but overall I was happy with the 250cc Starfire I had bought new from Leather & Simpson a year or two earlier. Memories!

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My Dad never really felt affection for the newer stuff although he did quite like BMW's. He always wanted a Scott but never actually had one.

 

Your dad didn't miss much never owning a Scott.These things really were a load of crap.I used to have a couple,an old girder forked open frame model which was made in Shipley and one of the last Birmingham made models with teles and swinging arm.Both were gas guzzlers and both prone to breaking crankpins,all equipment on them was specialised and just fitted the Scott and therefore cost an arm and a leg.On one I couldn't cure a leaking radiator and therefore I used to get wet even on dry days.Having said all this,when I came to sell them I had no problems,everybody seemed to want one so perhaps they had some good points after all.

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That's absolutely right about Scott Squirrels - they weren't so much a means of transport as a hobby. But with the water-cooling (and the "buzzing" sound they made) they had a kind of individuality that wasn't too common in motorbikes. Another water-cooled machine was the post-war 149 cc. (later 192 cc.) LE Velocette - this was another bike that you had to know to ride. Apart from water cooling and shaft drive, the first two models also had hand-start and gearchange, until 1958 when the Mk III came out. As lots of police forces around the country (including Sheffield City Police) used them in the 1950s, one theory was that "LE" stood for "law enforcement" but in fact it meant "little engine" (compared with, for example, the 349 cc. Velocette Viper and 499 cc. Venom and KSS of TT fame). I bought an ex-police Mk. II LE for £10 in 1967 (YWB 604) and it gave me a year or so of happy riding until it finally came to the end of the road. I replaced it with a new BSA 250 cc. Starfire from Leather & Simpson. Happy days!.:)

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That's absolutely right about Scott Squirrels - they weren't so much a means of transport as a hobby. But with the water-cooling (and the "buzzing" sound they made) they had a kind of individuality that wasn't too common in motorbikes. Another water-cooled machine was the post-war 149 cc. (later 192 cc.) LE Velocette - this was another bike that you had to know to ride. Apart from water cooling and shaft drive, the first two models also had hand-start and gearchange, until 1958 when the Mk III came out. As lots of police forces around the country (including Sheffield City Police) used them in the 1950s, one theory was that "LE" stood for "law enforcement" but in fact it meant "little engine" (compared with, for example, the 349 cc. Velocette Viper and 499 cc. Venom and KSS of TT fame). I bought an ex-police Mk. II LE for £10 in 1967 (YWB 604) and it gave me a year or so of happy riding until it finally came to the end of the road. I replaced it with a new BSA 250 cc. Starfire from Leather & Simpson. Happy days!.:)

 

The Velocettes of TT fame were the KTT,s (Kamshaft tourist trophy) not KSS (Kamshaft Super Sports).The family that owned Velocette were originally German.The KTT was a pure racer whereas the KSS was for normal road use and much cheaper.Both were overhead camshaft.

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The Velocettes of TT fame were the KTT,s (Kamshaft tourist trophy) not KSS (Kamshaft Super Sports)...
The KTT was of course well known on the TT circuit, but earlier KSS machines also won races there - for example in 1926 according to this website: http://velocette.org/history-of-veloce-ltd/ Edited by beechnut

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The KTT was of course well known on the TT circuit, but earlier KSS machines also won races there - for example in 1926 according to this website: http://velocette.org/history-of-veloce-ltd/

 

I stand corrected.I didn't realise the KSS was that early.It must make my KSS even more valuable!!

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My dementia just relaxed for a second - the guys name was Billy Nelson. Anyone know him??
was charlie freemans passenger n chair outfit

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There is a Charlie Freeman motorbike day in Eckington on Saturday 24th September its a damn good day with loads of different bikes from the old days and lots of pictures in the shop windows of Charlie and Billy its on from 10am to 4pm.The main rd which used to run through Eckington will be closed for it.

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I remember "Smiths" at Ecclesfield (Somewhere near the Bull Pub), sold 2nd hand bikes only in the late 70s, Also just around the corner next door to the Stocks Pub was Dereks Motorcycle spares (He later moved to Wheata Road for a while I recall) he was a great guy, he'd do anything to help.

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