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St Elizabeth's Home, Olive Grove.

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Does anyone have any information or knowledge of this home, - what kind of instutition it was etc.?

 

On the 1903 OS map it is shown as a fairly large building in it's own grounds on the corner of Duchess road and Queen's road opposite the entrance to the old railway goods yard.

 

On the later (probably 1925) Bacon's Large Scale Map of Sheffield that building is shown as a church and St Elizabeth's Home is an even larger building on a formerly 'greenfield' site opposite the junction of Slate street and Heeley Bank road.

 

St. Elizabeth Close seems to have been named after the home.

 

http://www.streetmap.co.uk/newmap.srf?x=435709&y=385543&z=1&sv=olive+grove+road&st=6&tl=Olive+Grove+Road,+Sheffield,+S_2&searchp=newsearch.srf&mapp=newmap.srf

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Was this the home of the Little Sister's of the Poor.

 

I thought that they took in old, sick ( ? homeless ) people and cared for them there. My Mom went round it once and said they were very well cared for.

 

There was a flag day for the L S of the P in Sheffield once a year and when young I used to rattle in tin in Town to collect for them. We also at school used to put the pins in the cardboard flags to be worn.

hazel

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It was the Little Sisters of the Poor. I worked there in the 70's for 3 years, it was a home for the elderly, run by Nuns. It Closed I think in the mid 80's

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I lived on Slate St, from memory it was a red brick, double fronted, 4/5 story building (with lift), and the chapel was attached to the rear. Some of the boundry walls and outbuildings are still there today, and form part of the new estate there.

I can remember the drive up to the building, and past a gatehouse, with statues in the grounds and in alcoves built into the walls. The gardens were always well kept and once a year were open, at some kind of summer fete. We used to help and do odd jobs with the gardner in the summer holidays, and would get our lunch, and ice cream. Some of the old guys would sit and tell us stories of the great war, and they had obviously been through a lot.

I remember when it was being demolished and this guy working on the building commenting on how well built it was, and the difficulty they had to demolish it. But it went around 85.

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Thanks everyone, :) - does anyone know what replaced St. Elizabeth's on the corner of Duchess road/Queens road ?

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Thanks everyone, :) - does anyone know what replaced St. Elizabeth's on the corner of Duchess road/Queens road ?

It is now a housing estate called St Elizabeth's Close

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Does anyone have any information or knowledge of this home, - what kind of instutition it was etc.?

 

On the 1903 OS map it is shown as a fairly large building in it's own grounds on the corner of Duchess road and Queen's road opposite the entrance to the old railway goods yard.

 

On the later (probably 1925) Bacon's Large Scale Map of Sheffield that building is shown as a church and St Elizabeth's Home is an even larger building on a formerly 'greenfield' site opposite the junction of Slate street and Heeley Bank road.

 

St. Elizabeth Close seems to have been named after the home.

 

http://www.streetmap.co.uk/newmap.srf?x=435709&y=385543&z=1&sv=olive+grove+road&st=6&tl=Olive+Grove+Road,+Sheffield,+S_2&searchp=newsearch.srf&mapp=newmap.srf

 

I lived at 122 Duchess Road, I do not recall any building in that vicinity, there was a high wall, we thought the river was behind it. Right opposite that location was the old TB Hospital. As kids we were always told to give it a wide berth

Almost in the location was an old time coblers shop, as kids we would watch him, he had the nails in his mouth and it almost seemed that he would spit them at the sole and simutaneously hammer the nail in.

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it was nowhere near duchess road,

 

if you refer to the map, above, You follow the curve of olive grove road where it meets heeley bank rd, you'll see a path of sorts marked out, and a street called St elizabeth close. that was where the convent was, quite the opposite side of the railway line and the river sheaf from Duchess rd.

 

the "little sisters of the poor, home for the sheffield aged" as it was named on the flag day stickers. I remember it well.

the TB hospital was on Winter Street, near the university arts tower

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Does anyone remember the Nuns from the home and their distinctive dress. I think their order originated in France and before the reforms of the early 1960's, they wore a traditional habit but with this heavily starched conical white head dress. If you were in town on a Saturday morning and it was busy , you could always see the headress above the crowd long before the nuns themselves came into view.

 

I may be out of line here but I seem to recollect that they often came into the city in this wonderful old Rolls Royce. Someone must have donated it to the order. It was dark green. and I think had been professionally converted into what they used to call an estate car. I often wondered what happened to it.

 

Regards

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Hi,

 

They used to call an estate car a shooting brake if you give your memory a shake.

 

My maternal grandmother, who was an Irish catholic (southern) died in the home about 1947. I can remember being taken to see her in there.

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Hi,

 

They used to call an estate car a shooting brake if you give your memory a shake.

 

My maternal grandmother, who was an Irish catholic (southern) died in the home about 1947. I can remember being taken to see her in there.

 

Hi,

 

"Shooting Brake", now that's a name from the past I had completely forgotten. Thanks for reminding me.

 

Where I grew up, the business had one which they just called "The brake". This was built on a SS Jaguar chassis and would go like the clappers. Never got to drive it, though I had some hair-raising rides in it.

 

Regards

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