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James Dixon and Sons - Info wanted.

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Originally posted by retep

Sorry i should have said a stool from a buffing shop, the old fella used to use it when he was buffing fine stuff, and so pee's on your theory about impossible when sat down.

 

He also spent plenty of time making fishing lure's out of silver tea spoons.

Ive worked in numerous Cutlery firms for well over 43 years and I have never seen anybody sitting down to Sand Buff. The firms were littered with three legged stools from twelve inches high to three foot. I digress, I would have to see someone sat Buffing to believe it, sorry.

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Who mentioned sand buffing, and the common name for the three leg stools in the antique trade is Buffing stool,

but as you say and I stood corrected there is no such thing as a buffing stool, only a stool from a buffing shop. As for buffing there are numerous types of buffing but who wants to get technical.

By the way mine's a four legged one bit like a bar stool, nice level floors at Dixons.

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There is only one type of Buffing and that is by using sand and oil. Some people call Dollying Buffing but its not, the other polishing terms are Sisaling, Silver Finishing and Satin Finishing.

By the way three legged stools are worth a good bit of money and I would think yours is too. Honours even.

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Hi, I'm not from Sheffield (sorry) but I work in a charity shop in the Midlands and we have had a silver/silver-like teapot donated.

 

It appears to have "J & S" stamped on the bottom of it, with a "G" below that. there is also a "1245" etched in. I can't decipher the other marks, but if anyone has any info I would be very grateful!

 

Sam

x

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I have only just found this thread so hope my response reaches all interested parties. At the very end of 2004 I had book published called 'Made in Sheffield The story of James Dixon and Sons, silversmiths'

ISBN 1-901587-52-5 pub by ALD publications, sheffield. 6 generations of my family worked there.

As I am very passionate about the work of the firm I approached the Millenium Galleries Manager and suggested that an exhibition in 2006 would be a good idea to mark the 200 years since the firm was started. I am delighted to say that this is starting Aug 5th until end of October 2006

I would be delighted to answer any queries about the firm.

Pauline Cooper Bell

pbell7@btinternet.com

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Hiya. Me and my partner have just bought our 1st place together. It is in Cornish Place. The old factory of James Dixon & sons. It was converted into apartments 4 yrs ago. We are both very interested to find out more about the history of the building and we would love to acquire some original James Dixon & sons silverware so we can bring it 'home'. If anyone one has any old pictures of Cornish Place or any info, please let me know. Thanks Jen x x x

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Hi, I am a new user of this site and boy am I glad to have found a place where I can maybe get some info from fellow enthusiasts of James Dixon and sons. I wqould love some info on a bowl that I have from JD&sons with the trumpet/bugle stamp,it is stamped on the base EP JD&S then the trumpet mark, above this is the numbers 7 1/2 and underneath the stamps is the letter and numbers Y2711 and under that it has MADE IN ENGLAND. The bowl is on a pedestal and is round with 9 scalloped shapes up to half way of the bowl. I as I said would be extremely grateful for any info as to the date of the piece aswell as a value or estimate if at all possible.

 

thanks in advance for your help. kath

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Hi, Hope someone out there can help me. I know nothing about silver or metalware. I was given a hipflask by an elderly relative and was going to give it to the local charity shop when I thought I would look up the name James Dixon and Sons - and now I am interested to learn more about it and to give it a permanant home! It has the bugle horn symbol, with like a U above it, the exact words and letters on it are as follows, Made in England, James Dixon & sons, sheffield. 48 8ozs E.T. Can anyone help me with the number 48, and E.T, I am not even sure what it is made of I have polished it up and it has come up quite nice but there is no silver mark or EPNS on it. Thanks Minimonkeychow :D

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Kathy,

I too am looking for information on an item, was wondering if you have obtained any more information on the piece you have - mine also have the trumpet, numbers, ect.

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And Moon - is 'l' actually the date year? the style of 'l' would need to be identified though to tie it down properly

 

Can you help date the markings by having 'James Dixon & Sons' completely stamped in rather than J D & S? My piece is described as posted earlier...

 

There first is an 'O' stamped above the info then and indented circle with the symbol that you show on your page, and Below that is a Stamp of a Trumpet.

Then..

James Dixon & Sons

Sheffield

EPBM

219

4

below that is another stamp, A Saunders Sydney (I am presuming this is where it was sold from in Australia, but I cannot be sure).

 

It's in pretty good shape and has a ring of porcelain on the handle and a pretty flower and leaf pattern on it with a swirl design on the bottom.

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Hi, I've never submitted a reply on this forum before so I hope this makes sense. I can't tell if you all have received a reply to your posts so I wanted to give you some of the information I have gained. I've been doing research on James Dixon & Sons, James Deakin & Sons and John Dixon and Sons. I am going to share what I have learned and hopefully I'm not sending you the same old stuff that someone else has already sent to your posts. Also, I've never used tags and plan to leave those alone, so please bear with me.

I'll start with coffee and tea ware. Creamers, pitchers or jugs along with the sugar bowl, tea and coffee pot, were made as separate items until the coming of the 19th century. The five piece set which then appeared was comprised of a teapot, coffee pot, hot water jug, sugar bowl and creamer. Both the teapot and coffee pot were proned to losing their lids and being partly melted by being put too close to the fire or on the hob to keep warm. Nearly all of these 19th century pieces would be Britannia Metal, an alloy of tin, copper and antimony. Similar to the look and feel to pewter, but much harder. Used primarily as a base metal to be silverplated. E.P.B.M. - Electroplated Britannia Metal. Electropolated Nickel Silver has the initials E.P.N.S., Electroplated Copper, E.P.C. and E.P.W.M., Eelectroplated White Metal. By 1838 Elkington & Co. had discovered and patented electroplating, E.P. In 1842 the company received financial backing from Josiah Mason, renaming the firm to Elkington, Mason & Co. a very successful company. The firm introduced Electrotyping as a new method of production for silver plated items, E.T.

Are you still with me? I'm going to have to finish this tomorrow. If I had realized I was going to go on and on and on, I would have started this much earlier! Please, if somebody has already submitted this information, let me know and I'll stop boring you with my gleanings. So, goodnight and you all have a great day.

Clydie ;)

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Thanks Ladylikeme now I know what ET stands for does that help indicate a date too? Thanks so much for your info. regards minimonkeychow:)

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