Jump to content

James Dixon and Sons - Info wanted.

Recommended Posts

My grandfather worked as a silversmith at Dixons from 1895 to 1945. He was presented with an EPNS teapot to commemorate 50 years loyal service. They spelled his name wrong!!!! I still have the pot and some of his apprentice pieces. They will be passed down to the eldest sons of the family in perpetuity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a good start for Hallmark info from the Sheffield assay office: http://www.assayoffice.co.uk/hallmark.htm

 

Another collection of useful links: http://www.sheffieldgalleries.org.uk/coresite/html/aboutmetal.asp

 

And Moon - is 'l' actually the date year? the style of 'l' would need to be identified though to tie it down properly

 

Edit: more useful info: http://antiques-finder.co.uk/marks.htm

 

http://www.csbooks.co.uk/acatalog/info_MI_2042.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a rather large serving spoon that has the James Dixon and Sons mark J D & S, but just before it, it has a Capitol letter "A" in a circle, nothing else. The spoon is engraved with a garden in Melbourne, Australia, "Boathouse Kew". Can anyone tell me if the A just simply signifies Australia, or maybe a year of manufacture? There is no indication of any heel wear or pitting. I kind of thought it might be sterling, but there are no assay marks or anything. Was silverware made in the Sheffield Plate process? Thanks in advance for any information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a cruet made by the Dixon Company. It is two tiered with a handle in the middle. It has four holes in the metal holding two glass bottles almost like two small decanters, I suppose they are for vinegar and oil. Also there are two further holes with a glass pepper pot- the top is metal and a mustard pot ,the top also is metal.

The markings are as follows.

 

X

Bugle with banner hanging from underneath

Numbers almost worn away with cleaning

EPBM

3340

 

This cruet belonged to my grandmother and has been in the family for at least 70 years.

I would love to know just how old it is.

 

Marinthea, Canada.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just for information as I was in Waterstones earlier this week and came across a new soft back book on the history of James Dixon and Sons, its in the local history section

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cynthia,

 

I have a book about Sheffield published in 1889, it has quite a lot about James Dixon & Sons but this bit may well interest you.

 

"It is indeed so like silver that in the case of some articles exhibted in the Great Exhibition of 1851 there was considerable difficulty in distinguishing the difference. The authorities recommended them to inscribe the words "Britannia Metal" on the cases so that the goods might not be mistaken for silver"

 

Looks as though that might be the explanation of the EPBM marking (Electro Plated Britannia Metal).

 

jen13

 

My book says "The extent of their productions may be judged by the fact that the works, of which we give an illustration, cover about four acres of land and more than 700 people are employed in them"

 

The illustration is a beautiful etching or the works complete with horses and carts, sorry but there is no way I could get it on my PC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks "Extaxman" for the info on my cruet. I have had a look at the numbers that are nearly worn away through a magnifying glass and now realise that they are some sort of a Hall mark.

Years ago when I lived in Sheffield I checked the bugle with banner at the City Library and established that it was made by Dixons but I could not find any dates. Your information is what I have tried to find out for a long time.

Many thanks,

Cynthia, Ontario, Canada. ex Sheffield

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by extaxman

The illustration is a beautiful etching or the works complete with horses and carts, sorry but there is no way I could get it on my PC.

 

Is it this one ?

 

http://www.picturesheffield.co.uk/cgi-bin/picturesheffield.pl?_cgifunction=form&_layout=picturesheffield&keyval=sheff.id=3748

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the one, never thought it would be on PictureSheffield.

 

Jen13 will be pleased to know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

Not sure if l have posted this request for info on the correct format, but here goes... Just purchased a waterjug/teapot (not sure which) made by James Dixon & Sons. Marks are as follows...

 

'C' on it's side with solid triangle or arrow shape inside, trumpet with banner logo, E.P.B.M, James Dixon & Sons on half circle, Sheffield, large E with 782, then single letter underneath...3, then Made In England.

 

Shape of jug has North African appearence, being about 7-8 inches high. Bulbous squat body, leading to slender neck to hinged lid, with lovely flowing spout. Has two raised black enamel bands on handle. Difficult to describe, could post photo if anybody could kindly tell me the age of this piece (my guess is not that old as the price l paid was very modest). Would be very interested to receive info please.

 

Kimrob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cant seem to find the right key to get in on the forum, but I am intereseted in getting some info on a HIP Flask made by James Dixon & Sons. Has the half moon and bugle hallmarks and the number 1427. Also says 12 ozs. This flask belonged to my wifes father and he probably purchased it in the 1910-20 period. If anyone can give me some lowdown on it I would appreciate it very much. Cheers from Canada. old_griz&shaw.ca

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

I recently obtained what was described as a pewter hip flask made by James Dixon & Sons. I am interested in finding out two things about this flask: first, about when was this flask made; and second, is the flask made of pewter or Britannia metal?

 

The flask is 6 inches tall and 3 1/2 inches wide and about 1 inch thick. It has a knurled screw top with a natural cork seal inside the top.

 

The only markings are on the bottom include: in the center of the bottom a trumpet and banner uderneath which is written "James Dixon & Sons" and under that "Sheffield." To the right of this is stamped the number "1413." To the left of center is a hollow inverted U shape--sort of looks like the receiver on a telephone set. There are no other markings, not the word England or Made in England--nothing else.

 

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

 

Cheers,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.