Jump to content


Neepsend & Tinsley power stations.

Recommended Posts

Could anyone supply the opening dates/closing dates (plus their MW outputs) for Neepsend power station and Tinsley power station ?

 

Also would anyone know the opening date of Sheffield/Crosspool TV transmitter ?

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neepsend Power Station

building started 1902 opened 1904 on the site of the Old Brickworks

closed 1976

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Neepsend had two 22 Mw BTH turbo-alternator sets and two 33Mw Metro-Vick.

 

Best to check with someone who worked there

 

Falls

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I worked at Neepsend Power Station in the early seventies. The official output was 160 MWs although boiler limitations prevented us generating more than about 130 MWs. There were 2 X 30 MW and 2 X 50 MW turbo-alternators. There was a mix of travelling grate and chain grate boilers (10 or 11 in total from memory). The travelling grate boiler auxiliaries were supplied with DC power from Ward-Leonard motor-generators for variable control of grate speed, fans, pumps etc without gearboxes. That's off the top of my head.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some great old pics of the Neepsend and Blackburn Meadows (Tinsley) power stations here:

 

http://www.picturesheffield.com/database_search.php

 

Blackburn Meadows was opened in 1921, was expanded in the 30's, and was dismantled in the 70's. IIRC its maxiumum capacity was 300MW.

 

Crosspool transmitting station opened in 1967.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

16m at the closest point I believe - hence the problems in demolishing them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎14‎/‎2008 at 9:46 PM, Rod Eaton said:

I worked at Neepsend Power Station in the early seventies. The official output was 160 MWs although boiler limitations prevented us generating more than about 130 MWs. There were 2 X 30 MW and 2 X 50 MW turbo-alternators. There was a mix of travelling grate and chain grate boilers (10 or 11 in total from memory). The travelling grate boiler auxiliaries were supplied with DC power from Ward-Leonard motor-generators for variable control of grate speed, fans, pumps etc without gearboxes. That's off the top of my head.

Hi Rod I know this is a long shot but do you recall the joiners shop at the bottom of the stairway to the canteen?,my father was the foreman joiner there known as "Joiner Ben"his mate was called Ernest!.You may have worked there after our old boy retired although he worked up to his 70th birthday!,our family lived in the cottage across the River Don on the bend at the bottom of Liversey Street where Sheffield College stands now!.My younger brother worked in the boiler room for a while mostly on nights which suited him because he could sleep through a lot of his shift the lazy get!.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.