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Your Old School Teachers, Memories And Stories


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15 hours ago, Alextopman said:

I wouldn't wish a Teachers job on anyone these days, discipline is practically impossible to impose and most of the Parents think they've got a little Angel that can't do any wrong.

I went to a good school,not everyone could get in you had to be approved.

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1 hour ago, francypants said:

 

:thumbsup:

 

 

:thumbsup:

 

From a very young age all my daughter ever wanted was to become a teacher.

Straight from University in the 90s she achieved her dream and loved it.

Fast forward about 25 years  .........   last year disillusioned and totally fed up she packed it all in.

Since leaving the profession she has become a different person,  she's stress free and much happier.     :clap:

Good for her- mental health is more important than anything else. 

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Mr Burridge - history teacher at King Teds mid/late 1950's.  Rumour had it that when he caned you he took a a run at you with black gown flowing to ensure maximum impact was thwacked on your  behind. I think he may have started the rumour himself as all pupils in my class with him were extremely well behaved and all did well in the end of term history exam.

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On 17/06/2024 at 11:42, hackey lad said:

Two old blokes I know often talk about a rough old teacher they had . At one point in his life he was fighting the Japanese, 10 years later he was fighting a class of unruly 12 year olds. 

 

Mr Goulding at Heeley Bank could have been one. Hardly ever smiled.  Heeley Bank serviced mostly Arbourthorne kids, and was a rough school.The pupils were silent in his class, heads down and he would silently come up behind you and punch you in the back for this or that He was hated by the kids, and their uncles and aunts he taught before them.

 

He was the guy the teachers sent you to to get caned. It was the only time he smiled. He never had a civil word for any of his students.

 

I found out here on SF, that he had suffered much while fighting in WW2, and still carried internal injuries, and obviously mental ones, but we never knew at the time. It partially explained why he was tolerated by the school. That, the strict discipline, and the exam results.

 

It was a different world then.

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29 minutes ago, trastrick said:

 

Mr Goulding at Heeley Bank could have been one. Hardly ever smiled.  Heeley Bank serviced mostly Arbourthorne kids, and was a rough school.The pupils were silent in his class, heads down and he would silently come up behind you and punch you in the back for this or that He was hated by the kids, and their uncles and aunts he taught before them.

 

He was the guy the teachers sent you to to get caned. It was the only time he smiled. He never had a civil word for any of his students.

 

I found out here on SF, that he had suffered much while fighting in WW2, and still carried internal injuries, and obviously mental ones, but we never knew at the time. It partially explained why he was tolerated by the school. That, the strict discipline, and the exam results.

 

It was a different world then.

As a nipper trastrick I lived in Midhill Road for a short time and attended the infants at Heeley Bank School. Don’t remember much about it except using the slate boards to write on and a reading scheme book called the ‘Little Red Fire Engine’. Came across a copy of it years later when at uni studying for a BEd.

The names of the teachers had completely vanished from my mind until a poster named Gilly Jnr pmd me in 2012 with the 3 names of the infant staff. She hasn’t been on the forum since 2018.

I do recall going to the outdoor toilets and subsequently walking out of school and back home only to be marched back with short shrift by my mother!

 

echo.

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1 hour ago, echo beach said:

As a nipper trastrick I lived in Midhill Road for a short time and attended the infants at Heeley Bank School. Don’t remember much about it except using the slate boards to write on and a reading scheme book called the ‘Little Red Fire Engine’. Came across a copy of it years later when at uni studying for a BEd.

The names of the teachers had completely vanished from my mind until a poster named Gilly Jnr pmd me in 2012 with the 3 names of the infant staff. She hasn’t been on the forum since 2018.

I do recall going to the outdoor toilets and subsequently walking out of school and back home only to be marched back with short shrift by my mother!

 

echo.

 

I went there too!

 

The Head was the old grey lady in flowing black robe, Miss Heard, and the assistant head was her sister, Little Miss Heard, also in black flowing robe. She was history teacher and a smashing drawer  whop decorated the board with dashing knights on horses in armor.  I remember she taught us by rote the list of all the invaders of Britain, Angles, Romans, Saxons, Vikings, Danes, Jutes, and Normans.

 

Dear lady would be shocked to learn, thanks to DNA, that it is WE who invaded Britain!

 

There are some old school photos around somewhere. I'll see if I can dig one out.

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My first school Stradbroke Infants had the most lovely Headmistress, the elderly Miss Dickinson.

If memory serves she walked with a stick and brought her poodle dog to school nearly every day. If you were upset about anything, she let you cuddle and pet the dog while you told her your troubles.

I remember every November 5th, she brought a little packet of homemade Bonfire toffee for every child, and a bundle of fireworks which she set off in the playground at our own little bonfire party. She also used to grant us extra playtime occasionally (probably when the teachers were in a meeting.

She also similarly marked Christmas and Easter. 

 

With her grey hair and ample busom she was just like your favourite Granny. They don't make them like that any more... They certainly weren't like that upstairs when you went up into the Junior school, under the auspices of the fearsome headmaster, Mr Long.

 

 

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3 hours ago, echo beach said:

I do recall going to the outdoor toilets and subsequently walking out of school and back home

My mum's tactic was to deliberately "forget" to put her knickers on so that the teachers would send her home to find them. 

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I'm not going to name names regarding those teachers I remember, but one thing that struck me was how the old teachers in the 1960s, those females approaching retirement age seemed so much older than 60. As one who will never see 60 again, they looked a lot older than I feel today.

I suppose this could be explained by the fact they lived through two World Wars, possibly losing people dear to them.

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