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You Can Now Do A Gcse In Sign Language

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1 hour ago, sheffbag said:

beat me to posting it but i think this is a fantastic development. BSL is a brilliant thing to learn and opens up a whole new world of communication both for deaf people and hearing people.

Absolutely, and it's totally optional of course. My friend, a special need teacher, taught her children BSL from a very young age, it's has come in useful to communicate across a crowd, to help and reassure them from a distance when they do public things. Chekhov's son could use it in supermarkets and from swimming pools to tell him to stop embarrassing him all the time.

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23 minutes ago, alan p said:

Both my parents were deaf so learned to sign at a early age. I also taught a mate back in the 60's the basic sign alphabet he picked it up in less than 2hrs. I have always said it should have been taught to kids when they first started school. Sadly both my parents are long gone and I haven't used sign language for a long time. 

>> I have always said it should have been taught to kids when they first started school<<

 

Do you mean all kids or kids who know someone who is deaf ?

I can see why if someone knows a deaf person who uses sign language it would be useful for them to learn it, but why should it be taught to kids most of whom will never use it ?

And, if my experience is anything to go by, if you do not use a language you forget it pretty quickly anyway.

 

3 minutes ago, Palomar said:

Absolutely, and it's totally optional of course. My friend, a special need teacher, taught her children BSL from a very young age, it's has come in useful to communicate across a crowd, to help and reassure them from a distance when they do public things. Chekhov's son could use it in supermarkets and from swimming pools to tell him to stop embarrassing him all the time.

He embarrasses me far more than the other way round I can assure you.

 

How come you always know these people who "prove" your arguments ?

Wasn't it you who knew a bloke who's young kids got Covid really badly (a very rare occurrence) ?

And were you the one who knew someone with heat pump central heating who said it kept his house warm as toast (another rare occurrence) ?

Edited by Chekhov

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3 minutes ago, Chekhov said:

but why should it be taught to kids most of whom will never use it ?

It's optional, like the comprehension classes you opted out of.

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29 minutes ago, alan p said:

Have you ever tried to follow the subtitles? They are a waste of time. I also had many scraps with people taking the micky out of deaf people. 

We use them regularly when the people on the box have odd accents and you cannot understand half of what they're saying, the Yorkshire accent being the worst, obviously. Or if I am watching Bangers &Cash but my lad is trying to sleep in the room above, I have the sound on really low and the subtitles.

More and more programmes these days do not have clear speech, it's trendy production techniques probably, just like when they keep swapping about from scene to scene at warp speed.

I find subtitles work pretty well.

 

12 minutes ago, Palomar said:

like the comprehension classes you opted out of.

Trolling surely ?

 

27 minutes ago, Mister M said:

Why is learning a language virtue signalling?

PrettyboyTom's answer sums it up "Rejoice"

More and more stuff these days is pure virtue signalling, done for what it looks like rather than how well it actually works  (particularly relative to what it costs). The Pandemic response is the best example, Johnson ended up towing the lockdown line (and keeping it going so long) because he was bothered what it'd look like if he didn't : "Look ! This is how bothered we are about every single life, aren't we virtuous !". Mike Buckley's infamous comment was an even better example (b0ll0x to the 3,000,000 pupils affected).

Edited by Chekhov

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It's a pity that there is no universal sign language that could be taught. BSL is fine for the UK, but what about other countries?

Does the country have enough teachers to teach BSL?

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1 minute ago, Hopman said:

It's a pity that there is no universal sign language that could be taught. BSL is fine for the UK, but what about other countries?

Does the country have enough teachers to teach BSL?

>>It's a pity that there is no universal sign language that could be taught.<<

 

I would agree.

 

>>Does the country have enough teachers to teach BSL?<<

 

That occurred to me. I wonder if they'll teach it "virtually" ?

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8 minutes ago, Chekhov said:

More and more stuff these days is pure virtue signalling, done for what it looks like rather than how well it actually works  (particularly relative to what it costs)......

PrettyboyTom's answer sums it up "Rejoice"

Is that the motivation for learning a language, how it looks to others? Personally good on someone taking the time to learn a new language, it certainly takes time and effort. But I doubt that someone would expend huge amounts of energy learning BSL, if they wanted to impress others. Surely they'd just get a bigger car

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37 minutes ago, alan p said:

Have you ever tried to follow the subtitles? They are a waste of time. I also had many scraps with people taking the micky out of deaf people. 

It's not commonly known, but people who have grown up using sign language in a Deaf household have English as a second language. BSL has a very different grammar and structure to English, so some people who are fluent in BSL are not fluent in written English

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1 hour ago, Chekhov said:

am not telling anyone what to do or how do, I am simply asking questioning a policy

I wouldn’t say questioning- you have already  made your mind up and are looking for affirmation from others.

 

Why don’t you just say what your real issue with it is?

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Guest

This is parody now, right?

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3 hours ago, Chekhov said:

British Sign Language to be introduced as GCSE in England

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/disability-67772338

 

But how many people will take the GCSE ?

How many will actually ever use it (and I mean use it regularly enough so they don't just forget it) ?

And, in an age when fewer and fewer people are taking foreign languages, why are they introducing another ?

But at least this all make us feel good about ourselves, we all live in a society where they teach kids sign language at school.

 

Approx 85,000 deaf people use sign language in this country, 1 in 765, which is about 500 in Sheffield.

Calm down, you silly hysterical tool.

 

Like most GCSE subjects, they are giving people the option to study it - not forcing kids at gunpoint.  Given deaf people are going nowhere, it is hardly an outrageous thing  for those who want to study it.  It  forms part of modern language just as much as any other. 

 

How many people who take the film studies at GCSE go on to be a director?   How many people who take the astronomy at GCSE turn into Brian Cox?  How many people who take physical education at GCSE become a world famous football player? 

 

You talking nonsense. Its about giving people the well-rounded basic education as a starting point with some more specialist personal choices in the latter years. They then go on form that basic education to then develop their careers and what other direction they choose.   To some a study of BSL may be a great boost for that and possibly fsr more practical than trying to remember pigeon French and Spanish from 10-20 years prior. 

 

Its how it's always been.  Like everything else the curriculum evolves.  

 

You really need to seek professional help. Its cringe making seeing a supposed grown adult constantly having hissy fits every time there's some minor trivial change to society.

Edited by ECCOnoob
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46 minutes ago, Delbow said:

It's not commonly known, but people who have grown up using sign language in a Deaf household have English as a second language. BSL has a very different grammar and structure to English, so some people who are fluent in BSL are not fluent in written English

:thumbsup:

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