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Sheffield Trees: Locals Heartbroken As 1,000 Trees To Be Felled

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Sheffield trees: Locals heartbroken as 1,000 trees to be felled at Yorkshire nature reserve

 

Hundreds of people have backed a campaign calling on Sheffield City Council to legally challenge the felling of more than 1,000 trees in a beauty spot.

 

The report is a bit disjointed, but scroll down page.

 

https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/people/sheffield-trees-locals-heartbroken-as-1000-trees-to-be-felled-at-yorkshire-nature-reserve-4388892

 

 

Edited by mart

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Wyming Broom, you say? 

 

Irene!!!!! 

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2 hours ago, mart said:

Sheffield trees: Locals heartbroken as 1,000 trees to be felled at Yorkshire nature reserve

 

Hundreds of people have backed a campaign calling on Sheffield City Council to legally challenge the felling of more than 1,000 trees in a beauty spot.

 

The report is a bit disjointed, but scroll down page.

 

https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/people/sheffield-trees-locals-heartbroken-as-1000-trees-to-be-felled-at-yorkshire-nature-reserve-4388892

 

 

So they'd rather the disease continued to spread to other larch trees by the look of it.

 

From the link above -

 

"The government‚Äôs Forestry Commission served a Statutory Plant Health Notice (SPHN) to Sheffield and Rotherham Wildlife Trust forcing it to chop down hundreds of larch trees after they contracted Phytophthora ramorum ‚Äď a non-native, fungus-like disease.

 

There is no cure and it is the Commission‚Äôs policy to destroy trees in the infected area ‚Äď including healthy trees ‚Äď as quickly as possible to prevent spreading."

 

 

Edited by Longcol

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On 29/10/2023 at 22:35, Longcol said:

So they'd rather the disease continued to spread to other larch trees by the look of it.

 

From the link above -

 

"The government‚Äôs Forestry Commission served a Statutory Plant Health Notice (SPHN) to Sheffield and Rotherham Wildlife Trust forcing it to chop down hundreds of larch trees after they contracted Phytophthora ramorum ‚Äď a non-native, fungus-like disease.

 

There is no cure and it is the Commission‚Äôs policy to destroy trees in the infected area ‚Äď including healthy trees ‚Äď as quickly as possible to prevent spreading."

 

 

I think a lot of trees were felled got the same reason around Whirlow Brook park for the same reason early this year.  Sad, but I don’t believe there’s any other option.

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The same is true over our way, and indeed nationally.
This Report is on The Goyt Valley

It's certainly left the hillside above Fernilee Reservoir looking a bit bare.
51113727982_4cdd3554ff_z.jpgGoyt Valley Tree Felling by Bill Williams, on Flickr

And a sign on the gate last year;
51115063615_eb5a2a8aaa_z.jpgGoyt Valley Tree Felling by Bill Williams, on Flickr

 

N.B I should add that there's no suggestion that the work on Wyming Brook will be so devastating, as the woodland there is much more mixed.

Edited by peak4

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On 29/10/2023 at 22:35, Longcol said:

So they'd rather the disease continued to spread to other larch trees by the look of it.

 

From the link above -

 

"The government‚Äôs Forestry Commission served a Statutory Plant Health Notice (SPHN) to Sheffield and Rotherham Wildlife Trust forcing it to chop down hundreds of larch trees after they contracted Phytophthora ramorum ‚Äď a non-native, fungus-like disease.

 

There is no cure and it is the Commission‚Äôs policy to destroy trees in the infected area ‚Äď including healthy trees ‚Äď as quickly as possible to prevent spreading."

 

 

It seems like it. Numpties eh.  Even the reporters can't get it right. They were probably despo for a story.

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On 29/10/2023 at 22:35, Longcol said:

So they'd rather the disease continued to spread to other larch trees by the look of it.

 

From the link above -

 

"The government‚Äôs Forestry Commission served a Statutory Plant Health Notice (SPHN) to Sheffield and Rotherham Wildlife Trust forcing it to chop down hundreds of larch trees after they contracted Phytophthora ramorum ‚Äď a non-native, fungus-like disease.

 

There is no cure and it is the Commission‚Äôs policy to destroy trees in the infected area ‚Äď including healthy trees ‚Äď as quickly as possible to prevent spreading."

 

 

Lots of larches are immune to this infection, and if they remain in place we'll still have larches in twenty years. 

 

If the Forestry Commission's plans go ahead then all the larches from here to Scotland will end up being felled. 

 

The people who work for Sheffield Council's forestry department are tearing their hair out about this, from what I hear. Their feeling is that it would be better to only remove trees which are showing an adverse reaction to the infection, and to allow others to remain in the hope that they'll be resistant. But the SPHN which has been served doesn't allow for that. It makes compulsory the felling of all larches within a certain distance of infected ones. 

 

My feeling is that the forestry department's staff are better informed, or have a better plan for the future of trees, than the Forestry Commission. 

 

Sad.

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On 08/11/2023 at 00:39, JournoBob said:

Lots of larches are immune to this infection, and if they remain in place we'll still have larches in twenty years. 

 

If the Forestry Commission's plans go ahead then all the larches from here to Scotland will end up being felled. 

 

The people who work for Sheffield Council's forestry department are tearing their hair out about this, from what I hear. Their feeling is that it would be better to only remove trees which are showing an adverse reaction to the infection, and to allow others to remain in the hope that they'll be resistant. But the SPHN which has been served doesn't allow for that. It makes compulsory the felling of all larches within a certain distance of infected ones. 

 

My feeling is that the forestry department's staff are better informed, or have a better plan for the future of trees, than the Forestry Commission. 

 

Sad.

Not according to this paper from July last year;

 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/efp.12759

 

"Exploring variation in susceptibility to Phytophthora ramorum in Japanese larch

 

"Variation in susceptibility to P. ramorum found in Californian coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) populations (Nagle et al., 2011; Ockels et al., 2007) gives hope for the survival of coast live oaks in the face of P. ramorum spread. In contrast, resistance to P. ramorum in larch remains to be identified, but the concept is of great interest to the UK forest industry in order to retain larch as a viable timber species."

 

Yes - they're trying to identify resistance, but only so the trees will be chopped down anyway for their timber.

 

And since when did SCC have a "Forestry Department"?

 

 

Looks like UK forests are in for a tough time regardless.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/nov/08/uk-forests-face-catastrophic-ecosystem-collapse-within-50-years-study-says-aoe?

 

 

 

 

Edited by Longcol

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