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Animal Activists Stage Sit In.

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31 minutes ago, mrm65 said:

Does anyone know why they would be permitted to do this in a private business, Surely if you are in a store and not as customer, then you are trespassing.

 

Am I wrong?

Presumably the store could have had their security remove the protesters, but allowed them the time to make a peaceful protest. Freedom of speech, lots of people are striking, protesting currently over pay pension and clean air zones. I think teachers striking and children missing lessons is a bigger problem to report than a peaceful protest in a supermarket. After schools closing for COVID hasn't this generation of school children had enough disruption to their education. Perhaps teachers could protest outside of the lesson time, maybe on a weekend or a teacher training day ūüėŹ.

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So you're annoyed that a peaceful protest by a branch of Animal Rebellion was too easy and not scary, and now you're annoyed because another branch has used less easy, more scary tactics elsewhere?  I think you just enjoyhaving a whine about it all on here.


And I think you are being deliberately obtuse now. 

To recap - I think that the Millhouses protest was a poorly chosen target.  Of all the things to protest about - if you feel strongly enough to organise a protest- why choose a few boxes of eggs in that location?   Is it out of fashion to protest about say,  McDonalds (low quality mass produced meat/packaging that gets littered everywhere/drive thru emissions/ultra processed food) ? And instead go to Sainsbury’s in Millhouses and try guilt trip people buying a  box of eggs?  And yes, I am allowed to make this point without organising my own personal protest. If they want to make a stand protesting then they can’t expect everyone to agree with them.

You brought up the subject of Animal Rebellion using ‚Äėmore scary tactics‚Äô elsewhere. My only comment on that was that you were suggesting these people were very tough, hard as nails protesters but the Millhouses bunch were choosing ‚Äėnice‚Äô areas to protest because they wanted a peaceful protest and wouldn‚Äôt want to things to ‚Äėget nasty‚Äô protesting somewhere rather less leafy and¬†middle class.¬†Which is rather contradictory.
Edited by redruby

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And I think you are being deliberately obtuse now. 

To recap - I think that the Millhouses protest was a poorly chosen target.  ...

Because it was in a middle class area that's easy and not too scary?  Do you want the apparently non-middle class people in other 'worse' areas of Sheffield 'narked off' instead, or do you want the protesters to face what you think will be a less accommodating response from customers elsewhere, somewhere that might be less welcoming to a peaceful protest?

 

Quote

... Of all the things to protest about - if you feel strongly enough to organise a protest- why choose a few boxes of eggs in that location?   Is it out of fashion to protest about say,  McDonalds (low quality mass produced meat/packaging that gets littered everywhere/drive thru emissions/ultra processed food) ? And instead go to Sainsbury’s in Millhouses and try guilt trip people buying a  box of eggs?  And yes, I am allowed to make this point without organising my own personal protest. If they want to make a stand protesting then they can’t expect everyone to agree with them. ...

The article linked to in the first post literally tells you why.  Did you read it?

 

Quote

You brought up the subject of Animal Rebellion using ‚Äėmore scary tactics‚Äô elsewhere. My only comment on that was that you were suggesting these people were very tough, hard as nails protesters but the Millhouses bunch were choosing ‚Äėnice‚Äô areas to protest because they wanted a peaceful protest and wouldn‚Äôt want to things to ‚Äėget nasty‚Äô protesting somewhere rather less leafy and¬†middle class.¬†Which is rather contradictory.

No, I was pointing out that Animal Rebellion apparently use a wide range of protest tactics in a wide range of locations.  The protest you're complaining about was a peaceful one; other protests by the same group have used the less easy and more scary tactics that you accused the group of avoiding. 

 

You were apparently concerned about 'narking people off who might otherwise support their cause', and yet in the same posts you condemned them for going for an 'easy target' in a protest apparently designed to be minimally obtrusive and disruptive and so less likely to nark people off and put people off from supporting their cause.  That's contradictory.

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I'm just glad, that there are still people who care enough about the welfare of animals, to give up their time to protest about it.

Present day society can be very uncaring.

 

 

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They should have been giving out free samples of vegetarian eggs.

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53 minutes ago, Organgrinder said:

I'm just glad, that there are still people who care enough about the welfare of animals, to give up their time to protest about it.

Present day society can be very uncaring.

I think their choice of method and location in this instance was quite savvy too: if Millhouses is a middle class area (I left Sheffield  years ago and can only really remember the park) then it's likely to have a good percentage of Guardian-reading yogurt knitters who are already buying free range eggs but might not be aware of the alleged misleading nature of some of the labelling associated with the product. 

 

Not only are those folk likely to be open to hearing the message behind the protest, they're also likely to retain sympathy for a peaceful protest such as this one, rather then one like the protests a few months back that involved tipping milk all over supermarkets' floors and consequent extensive cleaning up by some minimum wage cleaning crew.

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Preaching to the converted then basically. I rest my case. 

 

 

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1 minute ago, redruby said:

Preaching to the converted then basically. I rest my case. 

 

 

 

6 hours ago, Hecate said:

I think their choice of method and location in this instance was quite savvy too: if Millhouses is a middle class area (I left Sheffield  years ago and can only really remember the park) then it's likely to have a good percentage of Guardian-reading yogurt knitters who are already buying free range eggs but might not be aware of the alleged misleading nature of some of the labelling associated with the product. 

 

 

 

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They're lucky it was in Millhouses, it's quite "posh" up there, imagine if they'd done a protest, even a peaceful one at somewhere like the ASDA at Manor Top?

 

 

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4 minutes ago, redruby said:

Preaching to the converted then basically. I rest my case.

They're not telling people to buy free range eggs; they're trying to highlight the issues with them by presenting new information that buyers are likely not  aware of.  Exactly the opposite, then, of preaching to the converted.

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It’s still basically preaching to the converted. Not a literal, pedantic Sheffield Forum way. But in the sense that it won’t really make meaningful difference.

Anyway, this is getting dull. Enjoy virtue signalling to each other to your hearts content.

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3 minutes ago, redruby said:

It’s still basically preaching to the converted. Not a literal, pedantic Sheffield Forum way. But in the sense that it won’t really make meaningful difference.

Anyway, this is getting dull. Enjoy virtue signalling to each other to your hearts content.

You mean targetting an area where people are likely already concerned about animal welfare and so might be more likely to buy free range eggs, and giving them more information about animal welfare that could further inform their purchasing decisions?  That sort of meaningful difference?

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