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24 Hours In Police Custody - Channel 4

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3 minutes ago, nikki-red said:

He does know. He released a statement at the time.

Well he looked very surprised when they told him

 

He started crying....there were no tears but it seemed like crying

 

 

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Just now, Jack Grey said:

Well he looked very surprised when they told him

 

He started crying....there were no tears but it seemed like crying

 

 

Crocodile tears I felt. 

 

At one point I'm convinced he was smiling and laughing

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2 minutes ago, Delayed said:

Crocodile tears I felt. 

 

At one point I'm convinced he was smiling and laughing

Id like 5 minutes alone with him in a room....he wouldnt be laughing

 

I think prisoners have TV's in their cells now so hopefully everyone in his cell block watched it on TV last night and was waiting for him in the showers this morning

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He'll probs go into segregation, along with the other people convicted of crimes against children, so it's doubtful he'll get much prison justice.

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6 minutes ago, geared said:

He'll probs go into segregation, along with the other people convicted of crimes against children, so it's doubtful he'll get much prison justice.

Yeah your probably right

 

I highly recommend the 'Four Lives' mini series on the BBC about the Stephen Port Grindr murders....it was very well done

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Just seen it,what chance have these kids got in life,he's got life she'll have another bloke and probably spawn more kids,I hope the little kids left have been taken off her.

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Do you ever watch these programmes ,  have a  prison sentence in your mind then end up shouting ,  " how *********  long " ?

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, hackey lad said:

Do you ever watch these programmes ,  have a  prison sentence in your mind then end up shouting ,  " how *********  long " ?

A few years ago they shortened sentences because the prisons were full. Has that changed?

Now they are panicking because the hospitals are full!

Edited by El Cid

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On 08/01/2022 at 21:35, El Cid said:

A few years ago they shortened sentences because the prisons were full. Has that changed?

Now they are panicking because the hospitals are full!

I think your perception is not correct, not least because the prison population has continued to grow more or less continuously and there have been changes over the last couple of decades to increase the base length of sentencing for certain crimes - including the introduction of indeterminate sentences.

 

The government is predicting that the prison population will reach 98,500 by 2026 (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-population-projections-2021-to-2026).

 

Most people don't know how sentences are determined - they aren't just made up.   Surveys have shown that many people underestimate the normal sentences for crime, probably based on sensational news reporting of cases which are unusual or seem surprising.

 

In 2016, the average sentence for all offences was 18.8 months.   In 1993, it was 16 months.

 

In 2016, 34% of prisoners were serving less than 4 years.  In 1993 it was 54%.

 

The average sentence for the year ending June 2021 was 20.2 months, higher than 2016.

 

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201719/cmselect/cmjust/483/report-files/48307.htm

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-june-2021/criminal-justice-statistics-quarterly-june-2021-html#sentencing

 

For historical data on the prison population, see:  https://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/SN04334/SN04334.pdf.  The pandemic has reduced crime levels and slowed court processes, so there's a blip over the last year or so, but the trend has been mainly upwards for years.

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On 05/01/2022 at 18:59, Jack Grey said:

Id like 5 minutes alone with him in a room....he wouldnt be laughing

 

I think prisoners have TV's in their cells now so hopefully everyone in his cell block watched it on TV last night and was waiting for him in the showers this morning

I know this wasn't your point, but not all prisoners have a TV in their cell.   The prison system runs an incentives scheme, where you can earn certain privileges, one of which is the possibility of renting (for £1 a week) a TV.    The last statistics I could find suggest that just under half of prisoners have an incentives status which would permit the rental of a TV.

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2 hours ago, Dannyno said:

Most people don't know how sentences are determined - they aren't just made up.   Surveys have shown that many people underestimate the normal sentences for crime, probably based on sensational news reporting of cases which are unusual or seem surprising.

 

In 2016, the average sentence for all offences was 18.8 months.   In 1993, it was 16 months.

There are many things that affect the average sentence, giving people community service or a fine instead of a number of weeks in jail would push up the average.

The most common sentence is a fine, but people can also get community sentences, prison sentences, or simply be discharged if a court thinks there’s no further need for punishment.

It is a very complex area, perhaps you are right. Do people get let out early more these days?

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