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Cruelty To Children

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I reckon where social services are concerned that familiarity breeds contempt. I have known  many police officers who treat villains like mates, perhaps social services staff do similar. As an example I was out walking my late dog when this guy took a running kick at her, I immediately decked him and was very surprised when the police knocked on my door the following day, the WPC officer obviously knew the guy and was clearly on his side, I insisted that she arrest me or go, she opted for the latter. By the way the guy was in his fourties whilst I was then in my mid 60’s and a rheumatoid arthritis sufferer, I’m now in my mid 70’s and would do exactly the same if it happened again.

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2 hours ago, crookesey said:

I reckon where social services are concerned that familiarity breeds contempt. I have known  many police officers who treat villains like mates, perhaps social services staff do similar. As an example I was out walking my late dog when this guy took a running kick at her, I immediately decked him and was very surprised when the police knocked on my door the following day, the WPC officer obviously knew the guy and was clearly on his side, I insisted that she arrest me or go, she opted for the latter. By the way the guy was in his fourties whilst I was then in my mid 60’s and a rheumatoid arthritis sufferer, I’m now in my mid 70’s and would do exactly the same if it happened again.

I would be more than surprised if this was the case.

Based on what I know, there is a real loathing of social workers from many of their clients. 

From reading the accounts of social workers, many are spat at, physically assaulted, stalked and harassed and have their car vandalised. Of course, those are the ones we read about.....

There may well be social workers and clients who have a positive working relationship, and that's a good thing. 

Edited by Mister M

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5 minutes ago, Mister M said:

I would be more than surprised if this was the case.

Based on what I know, there is a real loathing of social workers from many of their clients. 

From reading the accounts of social workers, many are spat at, physically assaulted, stalked and harassed and have their car vandalised. Of course, those are the ones we read about.....

There may well be social workers and clients who have a positive working relationship, and that's a good thing. 

If what you say is correct then Social Services have got a real problem, they best sort it out.

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2 hours ago, crookesey said:

I insisted that she arrest me or go, she opted for the latter. By the way the guy was in his fourties whilst I was then in my mid 60’s and a rheumatoid arthritis sufferer, I’m now in my mid 70’s and would do exactly the same if it happened again.

The police didnt charge you with assault, I would say they were on your side.

Funny how we all look at things differently.

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26 minutes ago, El Cid said:

The police didnt charge you with assault, I would say they were on your side.

Funny how we all look at things differently.

They didn’t charge me because animal lovers would have sided  with me, that includes magistrates,  it’s funny how we look at things differently, 😉

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59 minutes ago, crookesey said:

If what you say is correct then Social Services have got a real problem, they best sort it out.

I watched the GMB interview this morning and wasn't surprised by Suzanne's reaction afterwards.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Mr Fisk said:

I watched the GMB interview this morning and wasn't surprised by Suzanne's reaction afterwards.

 

 

My wife taped the interview with the children services woman,she was useless and advised people to get medical help for kids with bruises,you’ve all on seeing a gp if your dying of cancer.

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7 minutes ago, ukdobby said:

My wife taped the interview with the children services woman,she was useless and advised people to get medical help for kids with bruises,you’ve all on seeing a gp if your dying of cancer.

I get that she was saying a trained doctor would asses a bruise, a social worker has no medical training, so the social worker should had refered the bruise to a doctor.

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4 hours ago, crookesey said:

I reckon where social services are concerned that familiarity breeds contempt. I have known  many police officers who treat villains like mates, perhaps social services staff do similar. As an example I was out walking my late dog when this guy took a running kick at her, I immediately decked him and was very surprised when the police knocked on my door the following day, the WPC officer obviously knew the guy and was clearly on his side, I insisted that she arrest me or go, she opted for the latter. By the way the guy was in his fourties whilst I was then in my mid 60’s and a rheumatoid arthritis sufferer, I’m now in my mid 70’s and would do exactly the same if it happened again.

This is unhelpful speculation. In children's social work it's accepted and clear that the children come first. If a social worker is allocated to work with a family, they are primarily the child's social worker. Obviously, in order to improve the child's situation a constructive relationship with the parents/carers is helpful, but if the parents/carers are being obstructive that's when the local authority will usually start to consider legal proceedings that can end up in the child being removed. Parents are often in conflict and they will try and play the social worker off against each other, and social workers have to be careful not to be manipulated, that is part of the job. I'm not saying they will get it right all of the time, no-one is perfect, but generally children's social workers are on their guard against being played.

 

One of the difficulties is that child protection social work is so demanding that it burns people out, so the vacancies are always high, and that means that a lot of newly qualified social workers end up in child protection teams, when really you'd want people with more experience. So it's important to look at how social workers can be supported to stay in child protection teams instead of voting with their feet.

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27 minutes ago, Delbow said:

One of the difficulties is that child protection social work is so demanding that it burns people out, so the vacancies are always high, and that means that a lot of newly qualified social workers end up in child protection teams, when really you'd want people with more experience. So it's important to look at how social workers can be supported to stay in child protection teams instead of voting with their feet.

Setting aside the current case ...

 

Child protection work is clearly very difficult. Failures can occur in both directions. Ripping families apart is obviously extremely traumatic for children and the care system has frequently been a source of danger to its 'users'. Leaving children with abusive or potentially abusive parents also carries huge risks. The close decisions are obviously hard decisions and the consequences of errors are massive. Rather than focusing on one particular case we (or rather the appropriate experts) need to make sure the system as a whole is functional and keeps errors at reasonable levels.

 

I don't know how to assess the system as a whole though my prejudice is that social work is underfunded and that Delbow's seemingly more informed assessment is right. I do know I don't trust either knee-jerk reactions or warm words from politicians and their ilk.

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13 hours ago, Delbow said:

This is unhelpful speculation. In children's social work it's accepted and clear that the children come first. If a social worker is allocated to work with a family, they are primarily the child's social worker. Obviously, in order to improve the child's situation a constructive relationship with the parents/carers is helpful, but if the parents/carers are being obstructive that's when the local authority will usually start to consider legal proceedings that can end up in the child being removed. Parents are often in conflict and they will try and play the social worker off against each other, and social workers have to be careful not to be manipulated, that is part of the job. I'm not saying they will get it right all of the time, no-one is perfect, but generally children's social workers are on their guard against being played.

 

One of the difficulties is that child protection social work is so demanding that it burns people out, so the vacancies are always high, and that means that a lot of newly qualified social workers end up in child protection teams, when really you'd want people with more experience. So it's important to look at how social workers can be supported to stay in child protection teams instead of voting with their feet.

Very dependent on the upbringing of the prospective social worker, don’t get me wrong I don’t blame some bright kid with a good degree who grew up on a rough council estate not wanting to return to their roots. Conversely I applaud the one brought up in relative luxury wanting to give something back, however this one is unlikely to succeed without having the help and assistance of the former.

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My niece is a bright kid who grew up on a council estate . After hard work,she got her qualifications at Uni and came back to Sheffield to do her dream job in Social Services. She doesn’t talk about it much but I am 99% sure she works in child protection/family services 

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