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Over A Quarter Of A Million For A Park Hill Flat

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13 hours ago, tinfoilhat said:

What's it's like to live in?

I've not lived in, but been in a few, as I said Tin... the first thing I noticed was the full window in the lounge, with balcony. Way better than new builds I've seen. 

I think people who bought early on will benefit, because they took a risk buying one, because it was new and unpoplar to many Sheffielders... if they sell now and give these risk-takers a boost on the property market, I think they deserve it. 

 

As I said I looked at one, and some in Kelham Island, and decided (wrongly as it happened, but I'm ok with it) that it was too risky purchase. 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Mr Bloke said:

Hmmm... :huh:


I'd heard that people living at Park Hill tend not to own a car for very long... :suspect:

pmsl…..

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10 hours ago, Ms Macbeth said:

I agree entirely.  And looking at the flats now, against what they were 20 years ago and not anyone's first, second or even third choice of social housing, there is no comparison.  They are airy, bright, with fantastic views.  And people obviously take pride in them.   

Just like when they were first built in the early 60s.

I remember an aunty, uncle and cousin moving into Park Hill Flats ( Norwich Row ) when it was brand new.

Compared to where they had moved from it was like living in a palace.   The flats were bright, spacious and were fully fitted even down to a waste disposal unit in the kitchen sink.  I'll never forget my uncle losing his false teeth down the waste disposal unit in the sink !!  We still laugh about that now.  🤣

The views from the windows were fantastic.  People were proud to live there and looked after their little palaces.  Sadly as often happens, the whole place which once won design awards went downhill and nobody wanted to live there.   Unfortunately it was a dream that turned sour.

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Being in my 70’s I recall large Neo Gothic Late Victorian properties in Burngreave being occupied by the likes of Northern General doctors and other senior hospital staff back when I was a lad. Never say never where once slum properties suddenly get a second chance, as with many areas of Sheffield a visible police force would be a great help, but don’t hold your breath.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, crookesey said:

Being in my 70’s I recall large Neo Gothic Late Victorian properties in Burngreave being occupied by the likes of Northern General doctors and other senior hospital staff back when I was a lad. Never say never where once slum properties suddenly get a second chance, as with many areas of Sheffield a visible police force would be a great help, but don’t hold your breath.

I don't agree.

 

Crime has evolved and the police have to evolve with it. People are no longer walking around these days with great wads of cash stuffed into their back pocket ripe for a mugging.  Cars are no longer flimsy rust buckets which can be broken into with a bent paperclip and started with a breadstick.  Drug deals are no longer done on street corners by shady men in long coats and suspicious handshakes involving transfer of little plastic packets.  Assault and physical harm are becoming less likely to be played out in the middle of the street for all to see and far more likely to be happening in the relative quiet of domestic Suburbia behind closed doors.   

 

Technology has evolved.  We are often described as one of the most surveilled nations on Earth.  Even basic domestic dwellings are commonly becoming equipped with  with CCTV cameras, connected to smartphones and automatic monitoring.  The traditional crimes so to speak are in decline with a significant explosion in the world of hacking, fraud and cybercrime which I would argue deserves more police hours than some 'Bobby on the beat' aimlessly wandering around in case they spot something by chance.   All that really ever does it's provide some faux sense of reassurance. I'll be interested to knuckle down the actual practical benefits over other policing methods.

 

Back to the development under discussion, compared to it's predecessor, this block will have have its own security concierges, cameras, lighting, fences, secure entrances....  all of which I would say is far better deterrent then the limited impact of 'visible policing'.

Edited by ECCOnoob

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7 minutes ago, ECCOnoob said:

I don't agree.

 

Crime has evolved and the police have to evolve with it. People are no longer walking around these days with great wads of cash stuffed into their back pocket ripe for a mugging.  Cars are no longer flimsy rust buckets which can be broken into with a bent paperclip and started with a breadstick.  Drug deals are no longer done on street corners by shady men in long coats and suspicious handshakes involving transfer of little plastic packets.  Assault and physical harm are becoming less likely to be played out in the middle of the street for all to see and far more likely to be happening in the relative quiet of domestic Suburbia behind closed doors.   

 

Technology has evolved.  We are often described as one of the most surveilled nations on Earth.  Even basic domestic dwellings are commonly becoming equipped with  with CCTV cameras, connected to smartphones and automatic monitoring.  The traditional crimes so to speak are in decline with a significant explosion in the world of hacking, fraud and cybercrime which I would argue deserves more police hours than some 'Bobby on the beat' aimlessly wandering around in case they spot something by chance.   All that really ever does it's provide some faux sense of reassurance. I'll be interested to knuckle down the actual practical benefits over other policing methods.

 

Back to the development under discussion, compared to it's predecessor, this block will have have its own security concierges, cameras, lighting, fences, secure entrances....  all of which I would say is far better deterrent then the limited impact of 'visible policing'.

Hmmm... :huh:


And so does a prison...


... but I wouldn't want to live in one of those either! :roll:

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2 hours ago, crookesey said:

Being in my 70’s I recall large Neo Gothic Late Victorian properties in Burngreave being occupied by the likes of Northern General doctors and other senior hospital staff back when I was a lad. Never say never where once slum properties suddenly get a second chance, as with many areas of Sheffield a visible police force would be a great help, but don’t hold your breath.

I have heard Lodgemoor was once considered a very dodgy area to hang around in, now it is one of the more expensive/prestigous areas to live in.

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1 hour ago, ECCOnoob said:

I don't agree.

 

Crime has evolved and the police have to evolve with it. People are no longer walking around these days with great wads of cash stuffed into their back pocket ripe for a mugging.  Cars are no longer flimsy rust buckets which can be broken into with a bent paperclip and started with a breadstick.  Drug deals are no longer done on street corners by shady men in long coats and suspicious handshakes involving transfer of little plastic packets.  Assault and physical harm are becoming less likely to be played out in the middle of the street for all to see and far more likely to be happening in the relative quiet of domestic Suburbia behind closed doors.   

 

Technology has evolved.  We are often described as one of the most surveilled nations on Earth.  Even basic domestic dwellings are commonly becoming equipped with  with CCTV cameras, connected to smartphones and automatic monitoring.  The traditional crimes so to speak are in decline with a significant explosion in the world of hacking, fraud and cybercrime which I would argue deserves more police hours than some 'Bobby on the beat' aimlessly wandering around in case they spot something by chance.   All that really ever does it's provide some faux sense of reassurance. I'll be interested to knuckle down the actual practical benefits over other policing methods.

 

Back to the development under discussion, compared to it's predecessor, this block will have have its own security concierges, cameras, lighting, fences, secure entrances....  all of which I would say is far better deterrent then the limited impact of 'visible policing'.

Well that’s quite a monologue against visible policing, I obviously don’t agree with you, such is life.

 

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Surely the question of a flat on the Park Hill estate, (is it still called thst?),  wouldn't be taking place if SCC didn't allow an enormous council housing asset to fall into rack & ruin in the first place, roughly within 30 years of being built? 

 

Even in the early 1980's the estate appeared to be thriving, being occupied by families, school on the doorstep, local shops, pub, (was it called 'The Target'?), then I seem to recall in The Star at the time, SCC having a plan to move 'problem' families & individuals on to the estate, in the belief that they will not would change their behaviour, being placed amongs the long term residents.  Of course, time has told that this didn't work. 

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Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, ECCOnoob said:

I don't agree.

 

Crime has evolved and the police have to evolve with it. People are no longer walking around these days with great wads of cash stuffed into their back pocket ripe for a mugging.  Cars are no longer flimsy rust buckets which can be broken into with a bent paperclip and started with a breadstick.  Drug deals are no longer done on street corners by shady men in long coats and suspicious handshakes involving transfer of little plastic packets.  Assault and physical harm are becoming less likely to be played out in the middle of the street for all to see and far more likely to be happening in the relative quiet of domestic Suburbia behind closed doors.   

 

Technology has evolved.  We are often described as one of the most surveilled nations on Earth.  Even basic domestic dwellings are commonly becoming equipped with  with CCTV cameras, connected to smartphones and automatic monitoring.  The traditional crimes so to speak are in decline with a significant explosion in the world of hacking, fraud and cybercrime which I would argue deserves more police hours than some 'Bobby on the beat' aimlessly wandering around in case they spot something by chance.   All that really ever does it's provide some faux sense of reassurance. I'll be interested to knuckle down the actual practical benefits over other policing methods.

 

Back to the development under discussion, compared to it's predecessor, this block will have have its own security concierges, cameras, lighting, fences, secure entrances....  all of which I would say is far better deterrent then the limited impact of 'visible policing'.

the old park hill flats had a police station on site, it made very little difference, I was a regular in the Zodiac (coffee Bar) in the fifties.

 

 Would I buy one of the flats, not on your nelly, 

Edited by kidley
updated

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