Jump to content

Massive Sheffield Housing Crisis On Its Way?

Recommended Posts

On 19/08/2021 at 17:10, the_bloke said:

I remember my house price doubling in a few years in the early years of the 2000s; we had far more social housing then as well as a buy to let market and holiday homes. Was that the fault of the Conservatives as well, who managed to preside over a housing price crash in the '90s?

Selling off all the council houses - and not using the proceeds to build new stock- showed a total lack of forward planning. 

There will always be people who cannot afford to buy who need safe, secure rented accommodation.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thats now causing a problem ,with council homes,several factors as you say 

A   the money was not spent from the sales on new housing

B   OAPs many live in 3-4 bed houses as they dont have bedroom tax

C  in a survey most OAPs would move if a bungalow was available to rent (sheffield)

D we need to build more social housing,but no buy to let

also why can we not have social housing,but if you work you can pay extra rent ,with a chance to buy,but security of housing if became unemployed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

There is a need to build more affordable,  suitable homes for an ageing population.   Lots of older homeowners can’t afford to buy into the private retirement housing market, but by selling their modest home could afford to pay a reasonable level of rent, and live comfortably without relying on benefits.  Many terrace houses have steep stairs, and with no possibility of a downstairs loo, life can be very difficult in older age.  The responsibility of maintaining a too large property is often too much for pensioners on a limited income,  as is the cost of heating.

 

By downsizing from rented or owned housing, they would free up larger homes in all tenures for families.   Its also been proved that living in suitable accommodation means quicker discharge from hospital, so bed blocking becomes less of an issue, and the need for residential or nursing care is likely to be delayed.  
 

bassett one is right with his comments, Sheffield CC and their social housing partners, please take note! 


 

 

Edited by Ms Macbeth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, kidley said:

Soaring number of empty homes in Sheffield

 

https://www.thestar.co.uk/news/soaring-number-empty-homes-sheffield-178737

 

I am sure the refugees will make good use of them, no criticism intended. 

74% of them are privately owned. The owners presumably don't want to rent them out or they would already be doing so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, nightrider said:

74% of them are privately owned. The owners presumably don't want to rent them out or they would already be doing so.

Most likely they're houses owned by people unable to occupy because now residing in Nursing Home.

It must be the owners' right (and nobody else's) to sell or let or leave vacant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Ms Macbeth said:

There is a need to build more affordable,  suitable homes for an ageing population.   Lots of older homeowners can’t afford to buy into the private retirement housing market, but by selling their modest home could afford to pay a reasonable level of rent, and live comfortably without relying on benefits.  Many terrace houses have steep stairs, and with no possibility of a downstairs loo, life can be very difficult in older age.  The responsibility of maintaining a too large property is often too much for pensioners on a limited income,  as is the cost of heating.

 

By downsizing from rented or owned housing, they would free up larger homes in all tenures for families.   Its also been proved that living in suitable accommodation means quicker discharge from hospital, so bed blocking becomes less of an issue, and the need for residential or nursing care is likely to be delayed.  
 

bassett one is right with his comments, Sheffield CC and their social housing partners, please take note! 


 

 

Excellent post Ms Macbeth.

This situation should hardly be a surprise to anyone, an aging population has been on the cards since the baby boom of the post war years, and has been apparent to those in government (especially those with a view of future demographics etc,) for a long time, so why has nothing been done about it? If you can work it out, why can't they?

 

And while we're at it, why is private retirement housing so well out of range of most of the elderly, even those with their own homes? This would be the ideal solution for many, but once again it's privatisation at work with no government control, and no socialist principles at heart, so it's  overpriced and unfair to all but the wealthy.

 

Bring the prices down to affordable levels and the problem is solved at a stroke.

 

 

Re: empty houses -

3 hours ago, Jeffrey Shaw said:

Most likely they're houses owned by people unable to occupy because now residing in Nursing Home.

It must be the owners' right (and nobody else's) to sell or let or leave vacant.

Not sure about that. Most people in nursing homes who own a home will have had to sell it to pay for their care.  The average cost of a care home is now getting on for a £1,000 a week and an average house will fund a care home place for less than 4 years. 

Edited by Anna B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't worry - the Tories are spending  £8.6 billion on "affordable homes" -

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/affordable-homes-programme-buyers-robert-jenrick-b1911285.html

 

- the bulk of which will be for sale - and you'll have to earn less than a paltry £80k per annum to buy one.

 

Why should anyone earning £80k pa be eligible for a government subsidised "affordable home"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Longcol said:

Don't worry - the Tories are spending  £8.6 billion on "affordable homes" -

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/affordable-homes-programme-buyers-robert-jenrick-b1911285.html

 

- the bulk of which will be for sale - and you'll have to earn less than a paltry £80k per annum to buy one.

 

Why should anyone earning £80k pa be eligible for a government subsidised "affordable home"?

This is just another typical Tory con, but it makes a good headline. 

 

I Hyde Park in the centre of London was granted planning permission on condition it contained 'affordable housing' 

The result was a skyscraper of 87 high priced flats (one sold for £160 million) many of which are bought but not lived in as a tax dodge for billionaires, and just 2 tiny 'affordable' flats round the back that are not allowed to use the same entrance, grounds or facilities as the others, and must be sold back to the owners at the original price. I can't find out what they cost, but there's affordable and 'affordable.'

 

I'd be interested to know how many people in Sheffield earn more than £80k per annum and therefore, poor dears, won't be eligible to buy one....

 

Edited by Anna B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Anna B said:

This is just another typical Tory con, but it makes a good headline. 

 

I Hyde Park in the centre of London was granted planning permission on condition it contained 'affordable housing' 

The result was a skyscraper of 87 high priced flats (one sold for £160 million) many of which are bought but not lived in as a tax dodge for billionaires, and just 2 tiny 'affordable' flats round the back that are not allowed to use the same entrance, grounds or facilities as the others, and must be sold back to the owners at the original price. I can't find out what they cost, but there's affordable and 'affordable.'

 

I'd be interested to know how many people in Sheffield earn more than £80k per annum and therefore, poor dears, won't be eligible to buy one....

 

I would think its quite a lot. Plenty of professors and consultants will earn more than that. Not to mention the legions of senior managers at the university nowadays.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Longcol said:

Don't worry - the Tories are spending  £8.6 billion on "affordable homes" -

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/affordable-homes-programme-buyers-robert-jenrick-b1911285.html

 

- the bulk of which will be for sale - and you'll have to earn less than a paltry £80k per annum to buy one.

 

Why should anyone earning £80k pa be eligible for a government subsidised "affordable home"?

Because in that there London somebody on an £80k will still only be able to afford a cupboard (No door, but with a view of a wall)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, nightrider said:

I would think its quite a lot. Plenty of professors and consultants will earn more than that. Not to mention the legions of senior managers at the university nowadays.

But they don't have the problem do they?  It's the people at the lower end of the scale that need help to buy.

Putting the level at 80k means the houses will most probably still not be affordable to those that need them.

And it still doesn't help the renters. 

Edited by Anna B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.