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How Will People Charge Electric Cars If They Dont Have A Driveway

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Roll-on hydrogen fuel. There's one filing station locally, at Catcliffe.

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Electric planes I am.very doubtful off.

 

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The public should not be expected to pay for any of the EV infrastructure costs above beyond (both meanings) that of supply to rural areas.

 

There are plenty of enormous multinationals willing to profit from the supply of energy from the Grid to users of EV. 

 

They will, initially, absorb the costs of research and implementation and pass it on to the end users over decades. This is what has happened globally for a hundred years in the energy supply industry-with the UK once  being an exception.

 

The Council would have a job of control and planning. 

 

EV running costs will always be higher than fossil if only because of Government long term policy to deter private vehicle use.

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3 hours ago, the_bloke said:

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/cars/1449607/Carbon-Battle-Bus-electric-coach-tourists-Eden-Project-Cornwall-charging

https://cornishstuff.com/2021/06/14/electric-coach-stranded-in-cornwall/

 

The Planet Mark `Zero Carbon Tour` electric coach, travelling from London to Cornwall, managed a grand distance of 263 miles before discovering that the charging infrastructure in Cornwall is as good as non existent.

 

A part of says they should have researched this beforehand..

 

Says it couldn't charge at five stations, so does that mean it kept trying different places but the equipment was just broken?

 

It doesn't seem that robust when put to frequent use

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1 hour ago, altus said:

800km on a 10 minute charge with batteries that need replacing half as often as now.

 

Not quite there yet but a guy who co-invented the technology that makes Li-ion batteries practical[1] has developed a way of fully charging them in 10 mins (as opposed to Tesla's best of 70 mins) in a way that makes the batteries last twice as long too.

Which is all well and good, but the electricity supply needed for just that one charge point is about the equivalent of the current infrastructure for about 600 houses - think of the equivalent of several substations devoted to just one charge point. And the charge cable would have to cope with (for example) 600A at 1000V.

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30 minutes ago, geared said:

 

Says it couldn't charge at five stations, so does that mean it kept trying different places but the equipment was just broken?

 

It doesn't seem that robust when put to frequent use

This is a valid point. If I go to a petrol station, the pumps will work. If the pumps don't work or are out of fuel - if its a motorway services its on the travel news. Look at the reviews of the charging apps. The apps don't work, chargers don't work, the maps aren't accurate - I read a few reviews from a few apps and it was a real eye opener.

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36 minutes ago, dave_the_m said:

Which is all well and good, but the electricity supply needed for just that one charge point is about the equivalent of the current infrastructure for about 600 houses - think of the equivalent of several substations devoted to just one charge point. And the charge cable would have to cope with (for example) 600A at 1000V.

That's something for the infrastructure people to sort out. It's worth noting that the charge point doesn't have to be connected directly to the grid. Some local storage capacity could be refilled from the grid at a lower rate, including when no vehicles are being charged, and then passed at a higher rate to the charging point. I'm sure the infrastructure people are aware of the issues.

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41 minutes ago, altus said:

That's something for the infrastructure people to sort out. It's worth noting that the charge point doesn't have to be connected directly to the grid. Some local storage capacity could be refilled from the grid at a lower rate, including when no vehicles are being charged, and then passed at a higher rate to the charging point. I'm sure the infrastructure people are aware of the issues.

Well at a motorway service station it's likely to be in near constant use for large periods of the day. The cable to the car would have to carry 200 times the power of a cable used for an electric kettle. These are problems the infrastructure people are aware of, but don't necessarily have answers for, -at least not answers which are economically viable.

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13 hours ago, dave_the_m said:

Well at a motorway service station it's likely to be in near constant use for large periods of the day. The cable to the car would have to carry 200 times the power of a cable used for an electric kettle. These are problems the infrastructure people are aware of, but don't necessarily have answers for, -at least not answers which are economically viable.

If you need to be able to charge up to n cars per hour at a motorway service station you need the same amount of energy whether you do it with n slower charging points or n/7 faster charging points. Service stations are likely to prefer the ones they need fewer of because they will be cheaper and take up less room.

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15 hours ago, geared said:

 

Says it couldn't charge at five stations, so does that mean it kept trying different places but the equipment was just broken?

 

It doesn't seem that robust when put to frequent use

Yep. The Cornish news article has more info:

Quote

 

As well as the five charging points in Cornwall which could not be used to charge the vehicle there were another five on the journey from London to Cornwall which could not be used.

 

In Cornwall the electric coach visited the following charging points but were unable to successfully charge the vehicle:

 

Bodmin Business Park – Genie Point – 50kW – machine not working, despite Zapp Map not reporting an issue.

Bodmin Morrisons – Genie Point – 50kW – recognised the coach but did not deliver the charge.

Kingsley Village – Shell – New Motion – Tritium charger – 170 kW – registered coach and charge left on coach but would not charge.

Cornwall Services – Ecotricity – 50 kW – error with the charger, engineer informed but did not work. At 11pm the coach met a Nissan Leaf driver who had tried three other charging stations experiencing problems.

Eden Project car park – Genie Point – 50 kW – recognised the coach but did not deliver the charge.

 

 

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I can't wait till 2035-2038 when it's decided (officially, we already know it now) that battery EVs aren't environmently friendly as they say now, like they did with diesels & then tell us we need to be buying another fuel sourced car, most likely HCF. 

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