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16 minutes ago, old tup said:

Thart reight but I had to use all my own sixpences and threepenny bits to pay for it,remember what my transport was like when I knocked about wi Whitey!.

Bet tha can't get that Merc up hill 60 in't quarry.

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1 minute ago, retep said:

Bet tha can't get that Merc up hill 60 in't quarry.

Thats where I may end up dumping it,I have a few painful memories of that place Eddie Kidd wouldn,t attempt some of the stunts I did up there,remember the somersault when I ended up unconscious what a pillock!

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1 hour ago, old tup said:

Thart reight but I had to use all my own sixpences and threepenny bits to pay for it,remember what my transport was like when I knocked about wi Whitey!.

Whitey had a transit pickup , wi horses painted on doors , also a gypsy cart , although I do not remember if he ever pulled it with a horse or not .

As to cars when I start counting I run out of paper , most of em ended up scrap , they were scrap when I bought em , just one or two would now be worth a fortune inc MGA, Daimler and Mercs , 

All watttter under Lady's Bridge now though int it .

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I remember my first car, a Frisky sport. That was the name of the car not me.

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My first car purchased with my hard earned was a 1935 Morris 8 bought for £25 ,our old boy got me a huge garage at the power station where I did it up for a few weeks!.All the paintwork black with maroon sides I revived with industrial brasso and one step wax,it had wire wheels that I cleaned up with emerycloth then repainted them!,the front wings frog eyed style had rusted holes that I pop riveted with aluminium and bondoed which I painted black with brushless paint,the rubber was perished on the running boards,I cut out rubber carpet to shape and glued it on!.I valeted the interior and had all the fluids changed and the engine serviced !.I went everywhere in that car, whenever I parked it people asked about it this was in 1960 so you didn,t see many like it around,I kept it for 18 months then sold it for £150 the only car I ever made money on I wish I still had it!.

Edited by old tup
wrong currency sign

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It's THAT bloody time of year again!  Lol

 

But during and after the war, we didn't have much, what with no Dad, and rationing.

 

But everybody in the neighborhood looked forward to Christmas. The adults used to have a "lay away" plan at the big shops , and everybody saved up for the things that they weren't normally able to afford. Everybody cheered up at Christmas, and there was Boxing Day when it was true to it's original name. A little gift from your employer.  It meant an extra bag of coal for the fire.

 

Toys and games for kids, Ludo and Snakes and Ladders, Blow Football, and maybe a Roy Rogers outfit if you were lucky. Always a Rupert book, maybe even a Dandy or Beano Annual.

 

The adults played 'Newmarket' for money, after the Christmas Dinner table was cleared.

 

Christmas caroling and Happy New Yearing filled our 'money boxes', as were invited in to "poke the fire" on New Years Eve, for good luck. Then downtown to Woolworths, or BHS for that item you never found in your stocking, which was actually a pillowcase.

 

It was a time of full bellies, treats, and a few bob spending money.

 

Today, it's outdated, because, by those standards it's Christmas every day now! Now, Christmas shopping is a pain, you have to think really hard to find something that folks really need. In those days it was easy - everything!

Edited by trastrick

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You are spot on there trastrick. That was when a chicken for dinner at xmas was a luxury. Don`t forget the silver threepenny bits in the xmas pud. As a kid I could never understand how my mother could cut the xmas pud and know where the threepenny bits were. It was years later when it dawned on me that she slipped them in after cutting. Happy days. Just remembered we played chase the ace as well as Newmarket.

Edited by Kidorry
Added text

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3 hours ago, Kidorry said:

You are spot on there trastrick. That was when a chicken for dinner at xmas was a luxury. Don`t forget the silver threepenny bits in the xmas pud. As a kid I could never understand how my mother could cut the xmas pud and know where the threepenny bits were. It was years later when it dawned on me that she slipped them in after cutting. Happy days. Just remembered we played chase the ace as well as Newmarket.

Merry Christmas Kidorry, Cuttsie, and all those who have shared their memories here!

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And the same to you and everyone else on the forum.

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Alec Caley . Alec lived on Gleadless Crescent in the 40's through to the 60's . He was a drainlayer by trade and a very handsome man with one of those very victorian mustaches that sat on his top lip like a well trimmed hedge .

I was a fostered kid who ended up a neighbour of the Caleys and Alec took to me and if he gave his three kids tuppence or thre pence to get soms spice from Merfins shop on Hurlfield Ave Alecwould make sure he gave me the same .

 

The clock could be set by the time Alec passed our window on the way to the Heeley and Sheffield house , the time was always bang on 8pm , not a minute before or a minute after .

He would pass the New Inn at bottom of Gleadless Common without giving it a glance as the only pub he ever went in was the Heeley and Sheffield .

Alec had his own seat which was in the window of the pub , If us kids happened to be around the area he would give us a wave and some times a bag of crisps would be chucked from the side door because that was what he was like a smashing bloke '

 

Some times Alec walked home unsteadaly through Dobsons fields that stretched from Gleadless Road to Gleadless Crescent . In the field where  horses and cows ,

Alec would stroke the horses as they were used to him and now and then he would attemp to get a ride across the fields on the way home .

One memory thatwas folk lore in our district is Alec sat astride a big mare facing the wrong way , He was happy and and singing telling the old horse that it  infact was going the wrong way  not him .

 Alec is mentioned in a book about old Glealess if I remember right , but all I remember is a cracking human being who was one of my heroes when growing up on that little Crescent at Gleadless now murdered by the Council .

Edited by cuttsie

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