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Undercover Police To Patrol Streets.

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32,000 officers in the Met.

One or two horrendous cases there,glad they lost thier careers

 

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On 20/03/2021 at 00:38, Box11 said:

You know I have a very good friend who used to work as a bouncer years ago at very dangerous pubs and nightclubs across Uk...

 

He told me that he was invited to attercliffe police station in Sheffield for a meeting because he wanted to become the pub manager at a pub on the Manor....

 

As the meeting took place the high ranking police officer asked him we see your car outside these unsavoury pubs and clubs but they never request police to attend how do you do it he turned round and said....

 

"I make sure everyone can see me constantly"....

 

In short the police need to get back to walking the beat and to be visible at all times !!!!.....

Walking the beat is all well and good until they need to travel to an emergency, miles away, on foot

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Dales said:

Walking the beat is all well and good until they need to travel to an emergency, miles away, on foot

But hopefully, with more uniformed coppers on the streets acting as a deterrent, there might be fewer emergencies. 

And I doubt cop cars will be done away with entirely.

Edited by Anna B

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Posted (edited)
31 minutes ago, Anna B said:

But hopefully, with more uniformed coppers on the streets acting as a deterrent, there might be fewer emergencies. 

And I doubt cop cars will be done away with entirely.

I find this regularly made demand by people for "bringing back more patrols on the streets" to be a complete false sense of security and waste of resource.  I suspect this is a quick  fix decision to easily appease the shouty brigade and opposition MPs.   

 

Even with a costly huge increase in officer numbers the chance of a plod being at the exact time and the exact location to directly observe and intervene in a crime taking place, is extremely slim.

 

In any event, despite some obvious recent events and isolated incidents the ONS statistics for last year shows that 'traditionally crimes' such as sexual assault, mugging, theft, criminal damage and possession of weapons were all in decline with some even dropping significantly. On the flip side, drugs offences, public disorder, monetary fraud and computer misuse offences were all rising if not significantly increasing.  Of course lockdown will give some obvious explanation however there is no chance of this ever going backwards now. Cybercrime has been on the increase for years and now is really breaking out into the public consciousness.

 

Such types of offences are not resolved by police officers aimlessly wandering the streets. It is through police officers undertaking intelligence, data analysis, cracking encryption, CCTV and sourced footage, undercover ops and other more sophisticated techniques.

 

Of course there will still be need for some level of visible policing particularly in vulnerable areas such as transport hubs or for specific purposes such as large crown gatherings or the usual drunken Friday and Saturday nights. However, there is no doubt that criminals have evolved and the police must evolve with them.

 

The twee black and white days of Dixon of Dock Green are long gone.

 

Edited by ECCOnoob

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4 hours ago, Dales said:

Walking the beat is all well and good until they need to travel to an emergency, miles away, on foot

Well have them patrolling in their cars and walking the beat crime is through the roof !!!!...

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, ECCOnoob said:

I find this regularly made demand by people for "bringing back more patrols on the streets" to be a complete false sense of security and waste of resource.  I suspect this is a quick  fix decision to easily appease the shouty brigade and opposition MPs.   

 

Even with a costly huge increase in officer numbers the chance of a plod being at the exact time and the exact location to directly observe and intervene in a crime taking place, is extremely slim.

 

In any event, despite some obvious recent events and isolated incidents the ONS statistics for last year shows that 'traditionally crimes' such as sexual assault, mugging, theft, criminal damage and possession of weapons were all in decline with some even dropping significantly. On the flip side, drugs offences, public disorder, monetary fraud and computer misuse offences were all rising if not significantly increasing.  Of course lockdown will give some obvious explanation however there is no chance of this ever going backwards now. Cybercrime has been on the increase for years and now is really breaking out into the public consciousness.

 

Such types of offences are not resolved by police officers aimlessly wandering the streets. It is through police officers undertaking intelligence, data analysis, cracking encryption, CCTV and sourced footage, undercover ops and other more sophisticated techniques.

 

Of course there will still be need for some level of visible policing particularly in vulnerable areas such as transport hubs or for specific purposes such as large crown gatherings or the usual drunken Friday and Saturday nights. However, there is no doubt that criminals have evolved and the police must evolve with them.

 

The twee black and white days of Dixon of Dock Green are long gone.

 

But they might be in the area or just around the corner etc, and this fact alone is a deterrent to the oportunist thief/burgler or local scrotes up to no good like criminal damage, harassment, sexual assault, car theft or vandalism, and it's this sort of crime that affects the general public most of all.

 

Most people I suspect would happily swap coppers on the beat for the numbers of police involved in policing traffic offences. This is where they have the balance wrong. Maybe people no longer report them because they know there's little point as the police won't do anything and so the perpetrators grow in confidence. I don't believe these numbers will be falling when life is back to normal. And (IMPO) I am alarmed at the number of police deployed to arrest 'soft targets' such as joggers exercising 2 miles from home and little old ladies enjoying a cup of tea in their back garden.

 

I agree that cyber crime is a growing problem, but this often requires specialists to assist the police rather than the police themselves, and intelligence gathering is certainly important especially for major crimes, but it's generally not these that affect the general public first hand, or add to the general sense of safety.   

 

 

Edited by Anna B

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Surely the specialist units that are fighting the growth industry of cyber crime are national, not local.  As such, they are within the remit of central government, and funded as such. 

 

As Anna B suggested, those fighting it are not police, and hold different skill sets.

 

We only tend to see police at football matches or traffic incidents these days, and the stats for burglaries are shocking.  No wonder people want to see more police presence on the beat.  We seem at present to be paying more and more for less and less policing.

 

 

 

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Your general Duty Group officer rarely 'patrols' regardless of in a vehicle or not.  They are dealing with an endless active queue.  This involves dealing with everything else that isn't an emergency ie priority and priority 8 jobs.

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