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Redundant Gas Fire Flue And Smell After Roof Cowl Removed

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Hi , I have redundant gas fire flue  (house bulit in 1970s)-  Vertical flue in the cavity with cowl out through roof.

Fire was removed about 25 years ago, gas capped off and hole at the back of the fire covered up. Only ever used an electric fire since. Never any problems in that time.

 

  About 6 weeks ago I had a roof repair carried out, around the flue area.  As the flue cowl though the roof was 40 years  and the flue no longer in use/needed the roofers suggested removing the cowl . Which I agreed to.  They installed new roof membrane and replaced a tile where the flue had been.  I think they also used some sort of sealant/glue

 

Over the weeks I've noticed a smell starting to develop in the lounge  -Not always there  at the start- difficult to describe.  However over the last week the smell is there most of the time (time and strength of smell seems to depends on temperature eg when its been a bit warmer with sun directly on the roof it isnt there/as strong) and seems to be sometimes like a glue smell/sometimes like a tar smell.

 

Always in the lounge and seemingly from around the fireplace . Cant get the smell at the fireplace itself, but almost as if its seeping through the wall/fireplace area

 

Before I get the roofers back, I just wondered if what I think could be happening is!

 

If the roofers did use some sort of sealant  - this would be right over what now remains of the flue, going down into the lounge.  Is it possible that fumes from the sealant are going down the flue in the cavity and seeping into the room somehow (given that the bottom of the flue space is covered up).  Or could it have another cause and I should have done something else when having the flue cowl removed?

 

Thanks!

 

 

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If its a 1970's house the roofing underfelt will be bitumen based. could be that ???

Not sure why they would have needed to use any kind of sealant or glue up there.

Have you been into the loft when the smell is present ? See if it smells the same up there.

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Hi Dan

Thanks for the thoughts.

 

Yes its a 1970s house and part of the repair was to replace some of the old Bitumen felt that had rotted due to a leak with new breathable membrane. So that should be over and either side of  the remaining flue.  From what I can see where they've replaced a tile over the cowl hole there seems to be a thick band of silicone along the bottom edge of that tile (?)

 

Been in the loft and and it does sometimes smell similar - but not as stong .    Just wanted to understand if, because the flue is covered at the bottom and theres now no 'air flow' through the flue, whether the lack of air flow  directly where the sealant will be ,meant that the sealant  (that maybe shouldnt be there) hadnt 'gone off' properly.  And the open flue was somehow conducting/trapping the smell.

 

I'll get the roofers back anyway!

 

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Yes having the flue sealed over may have inadvertently caused the problem, You've stopped the natural ventilation the flue was providing to the room.

 

 

 

 

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Thanks!!

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