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So What's Neoliberalism?

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1 hour ago, Anna B said:

The power of the media, which is in the hands of only a few oligarchs, cannot be underestimated.

It is a very well known way of controlling the masses.  

Repeating this will never make it true.

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12 hours ago, apelike said:

So Anna, what do you have or can put forward that will or can replace the current structure?

 

When it comes to business and politics unless you have something better to offer, that the masses will go for, then its bound to fail just like a new product will.

I think the answer is a return to Responsible Capitalism, as advocated by Jeremy Corbyn. That's why I was so disappointed at the way he was treated. 

 

Having said that, we are moving into uncharted times, with things like automation and AI, so we have a chance to try new ideas. One thing's for sure, we have to have a more equal society and a more equal world. Handled properly, automation is a game changer that could benefit everyone, but the profits have to trickle down.

 

My fear is it will just make the rich, richer, at the expense of everyone else. 

 

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2 minutes ago, Anna B said:

I think the answer is a return to Responsible Capitalism, as advocated by Jeremy Corbyn. That's why I was so disappointed at the way he was treated. 

 

Apelike said something the masses will go for.  They didn't go for Corbyn.  Twice.  

 

I saw Corbyn on TV a lot and thought him a petulant, unintelligent, un-dynamic, fence-sitting bore who promised more than he could deliver.  So I didn't vote for him or his party.  The only part the media played there was putting him on TV for me to see for myself.  Clearly many others felt the same.  Of course it's easier to say it was a conspiracy against him because that absolves him of responsibility for his and the party's failings under his leadership.  His supporters didn't help either and ought to now accept that.

 

So, what else?

 

I didn't vote Tory either.

 

 

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Arnold_Lane said:

Apelike said something the masses will go for.  They didn't go for Corbyn.  Twice.  

 

I saw Corbyn on TV a lot and thought him a petulant, unintelligent, un-dynamic, fence-sitting bore who promised more than he could deliver.  So I didn't vote for him or his party.  The only part the media played there was putting him on TV for me to see for myself.  Clearly many others felt the same.  Of course it's easier to say it was a conspiracy against him because that absolves him of responsibility for his and the party's failings under his leadership.  His supporters didn't help either and ought to now accept that.

 

So, what else?

 

I didn't vote Tory either.

 

 

 

 

I'm sure there are lots of people who voted Tory because they feared a petulant, unintelligent, un-dynamic, fence-sitting bore who promised more than he could deliver.

And look what they / we ended up with: a petulant, unintelligent, un-dynamic, fence-sitting bore who promised more than he could deliver. And much else beside.

And speaking of leaders wanting to absolve themselves of responsibility....

Edited by Mister M

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3 minutes ago, Mister M said:

I'm sure there are lots of people who voted Tory because they feared a petulant, unintelligent, un-dynamic, fence-sitting bore who promised more than he could deliver.

And look what they / we ended up with: a petulant, unintelligent, un-dynamic, fence-sitting bore who promised more than he could deliver. And much else beside.

And speaking of leaders wanting to absolve themselves of responsibility....

Quite.

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1 hour ago, Mister M said:

I'm sure there are lots of people who voted Tory because they feared a petulant, unintelligent, un-dynamic, fence-sitting bore who promised more than he could deliver.

I'm honestly not sure that is true. Many like me voted Tory this time round because of Brexit and the demographics on that are undisputable. A great deal of them were floating voters like me who decided being out of the EU was what they wanted so they voted in a Tory government that would uphold the result of a democratically held referendum.  Corbyn wanted to ignore that, stay in the EU and try to reform it from within, which was never going to happen even if he had won. The EU is a collective and one member alone will not and cannot change that. What voters ended up with was a 2 edged sword, good (Brexit) and bad (Tory), and the next GE will determine whether this Tory government can stay in power.

 

Edited by apelike

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13 minutes ago, apelike said:

I'm honestly not sure that is true. Many like me voted Tory this time round because of Brexit and the demographics on that are undisputable. A great deal of them were floating voters like me who decided being out of the EU was what they wanted so they voted in a Tory government that would uphold the result of a democratically held referendum.  Corbyn wanted to ignore that, stay in the EU and try to reform it from within, which was never going to happen even if he had won. The EU is a collective and one member alone will not and cannot change that. What voters ended up with was a 2 edged sword, good (Brexit) and bad (Tory), and the next GE will determine whether this Tory government can stay in power.

 

I'm sure you're right.

The Tories very cleverly, and deliberately tied the election to Brexit, thus diverting attention from their poor austerity record and other misdemeanors. People forget that. Similarly the Tories only gained power with the help of the Lib Dems, and Mrs May lost her majority massively in spite of calling a snap election and ended up with a hung parliament,

So not as cut and dried as people claim. 

 

As for Corbyn, it's his policies of returning to Responsible Capitalism I'm advocating, not necessarily the man in charge. 

I want somebody who looks out for the people not the Mega Corporations. The many, not the few.

 

Having said that, Corbyn was a very rare politician; experienced, honest and incorruptable.

He also had the principles, integrity, and the drive to follow through with what he proposed.

They don't come along very often, if ever, and will be a tough act to follow.

Starmer isn't a patch, and doesn't want the same things, as proved by the purging of the Corbynista agenda. He is Neoliberal through and through, and doesn't represent a threat to the status quo. 

 

So no real choice anymore, just business as usual whoever wins the next election...more of the same.   

 

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In order to understand politics today it is essential to be aware of the ideology known as neoliberalism. It explains the politics of Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, George W. Bush, and Tony Blair. David Cameron's 'big society', and George Osborne's austerity policies during the coalition and conservative governments in which he occupied the role of chancellor of the exchequer, are stark examples of neoliberalism at work. Margaret Thatcher installed neoliberalism into the Conservative Party immediately after she gained leadership in 1975, thereby cancelling traditional conservatism in British politics.

 

Neoiberal policy structured the financial deregulations in the US and the UK that led directly to the 2007/8 financial scandal and the bank bail-outs that followed. Anyone wondering why inequality has risen so dramatically over the last 40 years must gain a clear understanding of the techniques deployed by neoliberal economists and how they were able to capture and subvert finance in order to make sense of such a harrowing phenomenon.

 

It is also necessary to be aware that the printed press and commercial television functions as the public-facing agency of the neoliberal project, seeking to amuse, distract, misinform and entertain while the BBC continues to fail to help viewers join the dots or highlight the corruption in British politics. To make sense of neiliberalism we will have to do our own homework because no one is going to help us.

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"And one progressive response to Brexit, even from those of us who both campaigned for Remain and who are sceptical of the overall progressive impacts of it, is to reclaim and radicalise the dominant slogan and narrative of the Leave campaign, namely ‘take back control’. This slogan demonstrated the genius of the Leave campaign. Here, as an aside, the left and any left-wing populist response must learn from its enemies in terms of articulating and communicating its ideas and objectives. Vague and abstract talk about ‘capitalism’ or ‘neoliberalism’, never mind the other terms like ‘ideology’, ‘capital’, ‘political economy’ will not work to grab people’s attention. As a recovering politician myself (coupled with the handicap of being an academic), I know real politics (or at least political communication and engagement with our fellow citizens) is neither a seminar, nor an earnest ‘political discussion’ beloved of progressive parties and movements."          . . *my bold

https://brexitblog-rosalux.eu/2019/02/10/reflections-of-a-remainer-remoaner-on-the-progressive-potentials-of-brexit/

 

A good article linked, imo.

No insult intended.

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Posted (edited)
On 13/03/2021 at 09:44, Flanker7 said:

"And one progressive response to Brexit, even from those of us who both campaigned for Remain and who are sceptical of the overall progressive impacts of it, is to reclaim and radicalise the dominant slogan and narrative of the Leave campaign, namely ‘take back control’. This slogan demonstrated the genius of the Leave campaign. Here, as an aside, the left and any left-wing populist response must learn from its enemies in terms of articulating and communicating its ideas and objectives. Vague and abstract talk about ‘capitalism’ or ‘neoliberalism’, never mind the other terms like ‘ideology’, ‘capital’, ‘political economy’ will not work to grab people’s attention. As a recovering politician myself (coupled with the handicap of being an academic), I know real politics (or at least political communication and engagement with our fellow citizens) is neither a seminar, nor an earnest ‘political discussion’ beloved of progressive parties and movements."          . . *my bold

https://brexitblog-rosalux.eu/2019/02/10/reflections-of-a-remainer-remoaner-on-the-progressive-potentials-of-brexit/

 

A good article linked, imo.

No insult intended.

True.

Which is why the Tories can get away with catchy slogans and 'soundbites' that appeal to the masses and, dare I say it, simple minded.

Politics are complex, as your article above illustrates, and people are easily hoodwinked unless they look a little deeper. Put a corrupt man who lies and cheats up against an honest man who plays by the rules, and the liar will win every time unless people call him out, and to do that they need to aquire knowledge and information which needs some effort on their part. 

 

If you add that to the British prevalence of unquestioning trust and reverence towards our 'Elders and Betters,' our 'Superiors,' our 'Upper classes' who have been in charge for a thousand years, and would never be so base and low as to lie or cheat us would they? And it's no wonder the Tories get elected over and over again when they really shouldn't. 

 

 

 

Edited by Anna B

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Anna B said:

True.

Which is why the Tories can get away with catchy slogans and 'soundbites' that appeal to the masses and, dare I say it, simple minded.

Politics are complex, as your article above illustrates, and people are easily hoodwinked unless they look a little deeper. Put a corrupt man who lies and cheats up against an honest man who plays by the rules, and the liar will win every time unless people call him out, and to do that they need to aquire knowledge and information which needs some effort on their part. 

 

If you add that to the British prevalence of unquestioning trust and reverence towards our 'Elders and Betters,' our 'Superiors,' our 'Upper classes' who have been in charge for a thousand years, and would never be so base and low as to lie or cheat us would they? And it's no wonder the Tories get elected over and over again when they really shouldn't. 

 

 

 

Is "For the many, not the few" not a simple sound bite designed to appeal to "the masses?"

 

It's somewhat patronising to say those "taken in" by Tory slogans are simple mind.  Socialists will never win power whist ever they treat anyone other than themselves as either part of "The Establishment" or stupid.

Edited by Arnold_Lane

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Posted (edited)

Pointless.

Edited by tinfoilhat

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