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Hillsborough Corner Always Flooded

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1 hour ago, sheffandy said:

especially as there is the river Loxley to use an outlet just a few feet away. Really could do with addressing as it leaves everywhere filthy after drying up.

And you really think that the Environment Agency would allow all that filth  to be discharged directly into a river do you? The muck on the road will include oils and in winter de-icing salts, which could be very harmful to aquatic life.

 

I'm no highway drainage expert either, but I can see that the point where it floods its the low point on the roads from several different directions. What happens there is that the local drainage system can't cope with the amount of water thrown at it, so the capacity of the drainage system would need to be improved, or if that is not possible, storage capacity would need to be incorporated to hold the surge in water until the local system can get it away. All of which means a lot of digging and disruption and a lot of cost. That's a lot of money and effort to deal with an occasional minor inconvenience. That probably tells you why it hasn't been dealt with already. 

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23 hours ago, Organgrinder said:

WE were leading the world in modern engineering before both you and I were born and we maintained that world class expertise for many many years.

We now, according to you, have such an expert knowledge that someone like me can fail to comprehend and yet, we cannot undertake so many large projects

or even little flood prevention schemes.

I seem to recall that it was flooding there in the 70's before the supertram was even built.  There were also similar floods in many other parts of Sheffield too.

If you or anyone else has such vast knowledge of modern engineering and yet small projects such as this, are "too hard" to undertake or pay for then I still say " we must be useless."

It's not my dismissal that's shameful but the fact that a small project like that, can't be done.

Where has it been stated that its too hard? Of course it can be done, and most certainly by a UK engineering contractor.

 

It is no doubt much more complicated than running a pipe from puddle to local river.

 

The reasons we either use overseas resources or just don't carry out every imaginable project clearly comes down to far more than if we can use a UK engineering contractor to do them all. Funding, environmental impact, planning are all required, as you well know, but choose to call us useless because all these projects are not underway.

 

Back to your comment about the UK leading the world in engineering, not sure when that statement was last true, probably in the 1800s.

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21 hours ago, Magneteer said:

Mmmm, yes probably best just to leave it.

Thank God there was the expert on hand to answer!  🤣

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1 hour ago, sheffandy said:

Thank God there was the expert on hand to answer!  🤣

I was being sarcastic, sorry. 

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20 hours ago, Bargepole23 said:

Where has it been stated that its too hard? Of course it can be done, and most certainly by a UK engineering contractor.

 

It is no doubt much more complicated than running a pipe from puddle to local river.

 

The reasons we either use overseas resources or just don't carry out every imaginable project clearly comes down to far more than if we can use a UK engineering contractor to do them all. Funding, environmental impact, planning are all required, as you well know, but choose to call us useless because all these projects are not underway.

 

Back to your comment about the UK leading the world in engineering, not sure when that statement was last true, probably in the 1800s.


If it can be done, then why wasn't it?  Especially before construction of the Supertram systam.

You are excusing Sheffield City Council by trying to blind us with science. Maybe you work for Sheffield City Engineers.
Complicated doesn't matter. Compared with a scale of work done throughout history and including the last century,
(yes, we were still good in the 1900's), it must rate much less than 00.01% complicated.

Apart from all our great Cathedrals and buildings such as Westminster Hall we built an incredible infrastructure in this country.

 

I could quote all day long, great engineers of the 20th century, who you dismiss so lightly.
Have you not heard of R.J. Mitchell, Christopher Cockerell, Barnes Wallace, Clive Sinclair and even Dyson - just a few of dozens of leading engineers, designers and inventors.
Our Hawker Hunter was the first military plane in general use to break the sound barrier. Our Harrier Jet was the first vertical take off fighter which went into service.

Along with the French, we produced supersonic Concorde, which America & Russia tried and failed to do.
Computers, Calculators and TV's were developed here and the internet was conceived here. They were all done after the 1800's.
Us uneducated yokels may know a little bit more about engineering than you think, so I would prefer that you didn't talk down to us.
I don't think our City Engineers fail us so much as our City Council and Central Government but, compared with the old days, "we are still useless".

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37 minutes ago, Organgrinder said:


 

 

I could quote all day long, great engineers of the 20th century, who you dismiss so lightly.
Have you not heard of R.J. Mitchell, Christopher Cockerell, Barnes Wallace, Clive Sinclair and even Dyson - just a few of dozens of leading engineers, designers and inventors.
 

And not even a mention of the greatest of them all.

Islamabad Kingdom Brunel, reckon he would have sorted it.

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1 hour ago, Padders said:

And not even a mention of the greatest of them all.

Islamabad Kingdom Brunel, reckon he would have sorted it.

True enough, that guy was the bees knees but I was only quoting a few of those from the 20th century to show that we had still been doing things since the 1800's.

 

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There is plenty of run off water that drains directly into rivers and dams from roads and fields.

Ever seen the water pouring over the road into a Bradfield and directly into the Flask.

The dirt accumulates because the sediment settles in standing water and then becomes an issue.

Some places flood in exceptional circumstances,this puddle forms in very moderate rainfall and it would not be beyond a competent civil engineer to sort it out.

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On 17/12/2020 at 11:25, Planner1 said:

And you really think that the Environment Agency would allow all that filth  to be discharged directly into a river do you? The muck on the road will include oils and in winter de-icing salts, which could be very harmful to aquatic life.

 

I'm no highway drainage expert either, but I can see that the point where it floods its the low point on the roads from several different directions. What happens there is that the local drainage system can't cope with the amount of water thrown at it, so the capacity of the drainage system would need to be improved, or if that is not possible, storage capacity would need to be incorporated to hold the surge in water until the local system can get it away. All of which means a lot of digging and disruption and a lot of cost. That's a lot of money and effort to deal with an occasional minor inconvenience. That probably tells you why it hasn't been dealt with already. 

I've requested this be fixed on a couple of occasions and on the second it was dug up and relaid (poorly) several years ago. A guy I know who works in the industry in the area said the contractor is notoriously poor. I don't think the gully is actually connected to any local drainage which is the source of the problem. The gully is full of water days after it's rained. The only outlet is evaporation and the fact it's always wet contributes to it's regular collapses.

 

The scale of the problem is more related to the pedestrians and the business premises there which get soaked with muddy waves of water metres high each time a bus or a tram plough through it thoughtlessly.

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I wonder then, if the concrete pad which the tram lines are set in could at some point  start to subside as a long term result of all the standing water. Then we would be in for some serious disruption whilst major repairs were carried out.  It does seem strange though that this situation is allowed to continue on one of the busiest junctions in Sheffield. This thread has produced some great responses in regards to getting this situation dealt with along with some pretty lame excuses not to. 

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5 hours ago, Magneteer said:

I wonder then, if the concrete pad which the tram lines are set in could at some point  start to subside as a long term result of all the standing water. Then we would be in for some serious disruption whilst major repairs were carried out.  It does seem strange though that this situation is allowed to continue on one of the busiest junctions in Sheffield. This thread has produced some great responses in regards to getting this situation dealt with along with some pretty lame excuses not to. 

The gulleys and drain covers outside GeeVee are in very poor repair. I've reported it a couple of times, but nothing gets done. 

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