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No New Petrol Or Diesel Cars After 2030-Will There Be A U Turn?

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It would be ok running a 300+ foot cable

Could you imagine the Scrotes of today cutting the cables for fun.

Any worry about that when it happens for now

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The "charge up at the pump" scenario could become tricky, and nothing to do with generating capacity.

 

If you recharge at home, the cost will be shown on your electricity bill. So at least you will know how much per kW it's costing you.

 

If you stop and recharge at a commercial socket, will the price be displayed? In Norway, I read today, the price at the pump is scary, inflated by middle man costs, and companies looking to recoup their outlay in building the facility, laying the thick cables, etc. 

 

Bear in mind that any car will not charge up at any pump, as the plugs and sockets differ. So unlike the gas station......

 

Moreover, on the Continent people buying their new VW, Audi, Merc and suchlike are being coerced into signing up with the manufacturers' electricity scheme. 

 

Opportunity for having your leg lifted, if you ask me. 
 

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1 hour ago, tinfoilhat said:

I get you, I think. Quite a few new builds don’t have parking in the traditional way, just a parking area. Residents club together and get something installed I’d guess - or would the landowner/landlord/developer put something in? 

 

Electric vehicles and charging have come on leaps and bounds over the last 10 years so I don’t doubt somebody will have an idea how to get round something like this.

I'd have thought that also applied to a huge number of council flats (eg most of Gleadless Valley) and some of the "newer" (ie 70's) council estates eg Springvale.

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According to the CEBR (Centre for Economics and Business Research,) a third of motorists will not be able to afford even the cheapest electric car. That equates to about 10 million households.

 

"Even middle-earning households will have difficulty paying for one of the cheapest leased electric vehicles - the the £170 a month Skoda Citigo."

 

So I hope someone is investing in cheap electric public transport, as it looks like a fair number of us will be back on the bus again before long.

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They will have to put people's Benefits up then to afford an electric car,as they all seem to afford cars on benefits.

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42 minutes ago, Anna B said:

According to the CEBR (Centre for Economics and Business Research,) a third of motorists will not be able to afford even the cheapest electric car. That equates to about 10 million households.

 

"Even middle-earning households will have difficulty paying for one of the cheapest leased electric vehicles - the the £170 a month Skoda Citigo."

 

So I hope someone is investing in cheap electric public transport, as it looks like a fair number of us will be back on the bus again before long.

Buy second hand then. I can’t afford a brand new car now, I doubt I could in 10 years time. Won’t see me on a bus!

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The NHS has been going towards "care away from hospital" for a number of years, with investment and development of community services.

Guess how all those staff get around to deliver care...

 

Will we see Nurse Gladys Emmanuel back on a bike?!

One of the GP practices in Sheffield has a fleet of electric bikes to use for home visits.

I was told I couldn't use a bike as my transport (even the e-bike).

I'm relatively young and fit, so could probably manage it.  (As long as it was still there at the end of each visit of course).

Some of the older, less active staff?  Not so much, I would think...

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25 minutes ago, Becky B said:

The NHS has been going towards "care away from hospital" for a number of years, with investment and development of community services.

Guess how all those staff get around to deliver care...

 

Will we see Nurse Gladys Emmanuel back on a bike?!

One of the GP practices in Sheffield has a fleet of electric bikes to use for home visits.

I was told I couldn't use a bike as my transport (even the e-bike).

I'm relatively young and fit, so could probably manage it.  (As long as it was still there at the end of each visit of course).

Some of the older, less active staff?  Not so much, I would think...

But given the mileage they’d do an EV would go a week or more without charging wouldn’t it? Or stick Gladys Emmanuel on an E scooter!

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1 hour ago, Anna B said:

According to the CEBR (Centre for Economics and Business Research,) a third of motorists will not be able to afford even the cheapest electric car. That equates to about 10 million households.

 

"Even middle-earning households will have difficulty paying for one of the cheapest leased electric vehicles - the the £170 a month Skoda Citigo."

Are they comparing total cost of ownership or just purchase cost? Running a vehicle on electricity is much cheaper than running it on petrol/diesel.

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45 minutes ago, tinfoilhat said:

Buy second hand then. I can’t afford a brand new car now, I doubt I could in 10 years time. Won’t see me on a bus!

There won't be any second hand ones at first, and I heard something on the radio about them not being as suitable for the second hand market because they wear out a bit like phones with bits that will not be cheaply replaced. They were estimating 5 years as the lifespan of some of the ones that are being made at the moment. When the computers go wrong for instance, they are the devil to fix and difficult to replace. The batteries too hold less charge the more you recharge them and won't necessarily be made replacable in the future. 

 

If you think how often you're told with electronic devices, be cheaper to buy a new one...

The manufacturers of course will want people to replace them with new cars.

 

Hope they're wrong, but just saying...

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1 minute ago, Anna B said:

There won't be any second hand ones at first, and I heard something on the radio about them not being as suitable for the second hand market because they wear out a bit like phones with bits that will not be cheaply replaced. They were estimating 5 years as the lifespan of some of the ones that are being made at the moment. When the computers go wrong for instance, they are the devil to fix and difficult to replace. The batteries too hold less charge the more you recharge them and won't necessarily be made replacable in the future. 

 

If you think how often you're told with electronic devices, be cheaper to buy a new one...

The manufacturers of course will want people to replace them with new cars.

 

Hope they're wrong, but just saying...

Saw plenty of old Nissan leafs and even more old Prius in that there London on my last visit (some hybrids will be allowed in 2030 remember). Biggest concern is the batteries as you point out. Renault offered (still offering?) lease deals on batteries for older electric vehicles if memory serves.

 

Put it another way. Oil is very much finite. Solar container ships, solar airliners are a long long way away. Fertilisers and pesticides (like them or not, there’s a strong argument they’ve increased the population of the planet more than anything) require oil, as do many many other things. If you’ve got any other ideas on how to get 7 billion (8 by 2030) around without the use of fossil fuels, in a hurry, please write in.

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