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Can I Install An Ev Charging Point At Home Without Installing A Smart Meter?

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On ‎11‎/‎10‎/‎2020 at 03:11, Bargepole23 said:

EV charging demand will generally be at times of low domestic demand, overnight generally.

 

How does a Smart meter know what devices are in use? Its just on the incoming supply.

Apparently, different devices have different load signatures, and "they" can infer which ones you're using from that, with increasing accuracy.  But I can't see how the smart meter could switch off individual devices.  Presumably the individual devices would have to be "smart" in order for "them" to be able to do that?

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1 hour ago, CaptainSwing said:

Apparently, different devices have different load signatures, and "they" can infer which ones you're using from that, with increasing accuracy.  But I can't see how the smart meter could switch off individual devices.  Presumably the individual devices would have to be "smart" in order for "them" to be able to do that?

I found this article that explains that Smart Meters can be used to switch EV's (and other devices) off:

 

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/UK-Energy-Firms-Could-Switch-Off-EV-Chargers-As-Demand-Peaks.html

and this is the Government plan that is the link within it:

https://www.dcusa.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/DCP-371_Last-resort-arrangements-for-Distributors-to-manage-specific-consumer-connected-devices.pdf

 

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Existing "Smart" meters do not have the ability to selectively restrict supply.

Any future plans of this sort will need a new generation of meters.

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7 hours ago, muddycoffee said:

My understanding of the issue is that to preserve the Battery and make it last for as many years as possible, the battery is charged more gradually overnight and not to 100%.

So there wouldn't be a massive peak evening demand, the charging demand comes through the middle of the night, but it is spread out over many hours depending upon the charging profile.

 

That depend on the charger being used as well as the person using it.  They won't do that be default, they'll just start charging as soon as they're plugged in, at a fair rate.

 

They can be set to charge overnight, but it's down to individual users, if they don't have the right energy tariff they won't bother.

Large spikes in demand are inevitable with large-scale EV use, to change that the government would have to mandate specific charge times and have some way of enforcing that.

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1 hour ago, enntee said:

Existing "Smart" meters do not have the ability to selectively restrict supply.

Any future plans of this sort will need a new generation of meters.

Yes, as @Thirsty Relic's second link says:

 

"Future generations of smart meters will be available with Han Connected Auxiliary Load Control Switches (HCALCS) that would facilitate smart load control and innovative flexibility service products,"

 

which I think means that 'they' will be able to switch off individual circuits in your house, but don't have this facility yet.

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My smart meter is at the source. It has no idea whether I'm running a hairdrier or a vehicle charger. Both of which will be (more than likely) on the ring main.

 

Even if they weren't, they'd be on separate fuses and my smart meter is nowhere near those.

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1 hour ago, CaptainSwing said:

Yes, as @Thirsty Relic's second link says:

 

"Future generations of smart meters will be available with Han Connected Auxiliary Load Control Switches (HCALCS) that would facilitate smart load control and innovative flexibility service products,"

 

which I think means that 'they' will be able to switch off individual circuits in your house, but don't have this facility yet.

Exactly!  But before everybody thinks all is OK, the most optimistic view of those pushing the current version of smart meters say they will last for 15 years without replacement.  Many doubt this, and cite a number of reasons.

 

As the Government is behind the "Smart" meter project and says we can all opt not to have one (see Ofgem on this), the pages I cite suggest that will change shortly.  It follows that it is highly unlikely that they would allow people with smart meters to go back to non-smart meters.

 

If I had an electric car, I would certainly be doing all I could to avoid having a "smart" meter!

 

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15 hours ago, CaptainSwing said:

Yes, as @Thirsty Relic's second link says:

 

"Future generations of smart meters will be available with Han Connected Auxiliary Load Control Switches (HCALCS) that would facilitate smart load control and innovative flexibility service products,"

 

which I think means that 'they' will be able to switch off individual circuits in your house, but don't have this facility yet.

 

They've already had a massive push to stick smart meters in everywhere, I doubt there will be funding to replace everything once again with a new generation.

 

Most likely it'll be something mandated for new builds.

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