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Can I Install An Ev Charging Point At Home Without Installing A Smart Meter?

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Posted (edited)

Smart Meters require a steady O2 mobile signal, moreover "they" can switch off the supply if everything gets overloaded, so I could come out in the morning to an uncharged car. Or am I being unreasonable?

Edited by Cyclecar
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I don't see why you absolutely need a smart meter to install an EV charge point.

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59 minutes ago, geared said:

I don't see why you absolutely need a smart meter to install an EV charge point.

It won't be long before EV points require their very own meter, operated by HMRC ;)

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Cyclecar said:

Smart Meters require a steady O2 mobile signal, moreover "they" can switch off the supply if everything gets overloaded, so I could come out in the morning to an uncharged car. Or am I being unreasonable?

I very much doubt smart meters will be used to switch off supply. That would result in a lot of claims for spoiled frozen food and other damages.

 

I also can't see the link between smart meters and getting an EV point installed. Surely you just get an electrician to supply, install, test and certify the appropriate equipment and circuit from your existing CU?

Edited by Bargepole23
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5 hours ago, Bargepole23 said:

I very much doubt smart meters will be used to switch off supply. That would result in a lot of claims for spoiled frozen food and other damages.

 

 

With or without Smart Meters, your house insurance covers you for spoilt food from power outages, as there is no guarantee of service from energy companies.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Thirsty Relic said:

With or without Smart Meters, your house insurance covers you for spoilt food from power outages, as there is no guarantee of service from energy companies.

Waat about £100 excess on  ins policy

Edited by spider1

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1 hour ago, spider1 said:

Waat about £100 excess on  ins policy

I was just pointing out that spoilt food wouldn't mean a claim against the Smart Meter company,  and that that was down to home insurence policy.  Of course, the excess is down to whatever your home policy states, so most people probably wouldn't claim.

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If you are charging overnight why would you need a DC charger? Why not just charge it on your AC supply and get an economy 7 tariff.

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Of course, another strand to this is that we have already seen recent power outages in Sheffield being discussed on this Forum, and being told that the Electric people are doing their best as more people are at home, so more power is being consumed.  Therefore, as we are being urged towards Electric driven cars, even more demand is being placed on electricity, leading to more outages.

 

As Smart Meters can tell us what devices are in use, and how much power they are consuming, it follows that they may well decide which devices to switch off when demand outstrips supply.  I guess having a half-powered up car when you get up is better than knowing your "frozen" food has thawed out!

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18 hours ago, Thirsty Relic said:

Of course, another strand to this is that we have already seen recent power outages in Sheffield being discussed on this Forum, and being told that the Electric people are doing their best as more people are at home, so more power is being consumed.  Therefore, as we are being urged towards Electric driven cars, even more demand is being placed on electricity, leading to more outages.

 

As Smart Meters can tell us what devices are in use, and how much power they are consuming, it follows that they may well decide which devices to switch off when demand outstrips supply.  I guess having a half-powered up car when you get up is better than knowing your "frozen" food has thawed out!

EV charging demand will generally be at times of low domestic demand, overnight generally.

 

How does a Smart meter know what devices are in use? Its just on the incoming supply.

Edited by Bargepole23

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2 hours ago, Bargepole23 said:

EV charging demand will generally be at times of low domestic demand, overnight generally.

 

How does a Smart meter know what devices are in use? Its just on the incoming supply.

Only if the charger is smart.

 

Currently people get home from work, shove the charger in, it starts charging and they go inside.  This will lead to massive peak evening demand if significant numbers of people are using EV's.

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18 hours ago, geared said:

Currently people get home from work, shove the charger in, it starts charging and they go inside.  This will lead to massive peak evening demand if significant numbers of people are using EV's.

My understanding of the issue is that to preserve the Battery and make it last for as many years as possible, the battery is charged more gradually overnight and not to 100%.

So there wouldn't be a massive peak evening demand, the charging demand comes through the middle of the night, but it is spread out over many hours depending upon the charging profile.

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