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Local dialect of sheffield

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Are dah gunna lern 'em den, cos ahm norra reight lot o' gud at it me da nose.

M

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Are dah gunna lern 'em den, cos ahm norra reight lot o' gud at it me da nose.

M

thaz gora b jokin diz nowt dahn f dem dingles

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more for the list bobar meaning poo but where does the word come from

 

what about a full ""scutch".,a smack across the back of the head and the word "gozz", to spit, where do they originate ?.

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Hi,

I always assumed that the word gozz was a corruption of the verb to gob or spit. I am familiar with the word scutch and the sometimes painful result to the scutched but I know not from whence it came.

Mike

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Bricklayers and masons use a tool called a scutch.

 

It is like a brick hammer but has replaceable hardened teeth that you can change.

 

They use it to chip pieces or cleaning cement or mortar off bricks or stone.

 

PopT

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My Mum always used to say 'Clammin' meaning hungry. I'm clamming ! Don't hear anyone say it nowadays, does anyone else remember it being said ?

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Hi,

I always assumed that the word gozz was a corruption of the verb to gob or spit. I am familiar with the word scutch and the sometimes painful result to the scutched but I know not from whence it came.

Mike

 

Thanks for the reply,reminds me of "huffin an puffin" when yerouter breth,must find other things to talk "abart" then.

What tha doin in Cambrigde then, a tha upta no gud the or wat?.

Edited by Alan Belk
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As I remember the old saying was 'Clammed to deeath' meaning, Clamped to death- being hungry.

 

You never hear it nowadays when everyone is overeating and the use of the phrase is no longer in common use.

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That's a good old term 'clammed', although I've heard it slightly different, 'clemmed'. 'Clemmed to deeath'. Also I've heard it used in situations when a person is standing around in a quandry or trying to dodge doing any work, he would be accused of 'standing about like 'clem' or 'looking like clem'.

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I left Sheffield in '66 when I was nineteen to live in Dorset, had to speak different to make myself understood. I visited a chip shop(oil) at Intake 15 years later gave my order in what I thought was non Sheffieldish. The woman behind the counter identified my accent as in the area of Stonecliffe Rd./ Harborough Ave/Circle/Fretson Rd on the Manor. Pretty amazing don't you think?

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That's a good old term 'clammed', although I've heard it slightly different, 'clemmed'. 'Clemmed to deeath'. Also I've heard it used in situations when a person is standing around in a quandry or trying to dodge doing any work, he would be accused of 'standing about like 'clem' or 'looking like clem'.

 

My mum says "clemmed" and it meant to be starved or hungry.

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