Jump to content
We’re excited to announce the forum is under new management! Details to follow.

Toothpaste Gums

Recommended Posts

I am 59 so my teeth/gums are not too good. The dentist will tell me to put Sensodyne toothpaste on my teeth to help to relieve my pain.

To me this is just like being fobbed off. Why would one particular brand of toothpaste help?

If anyone can say what is in this toothpaste, that relieves my pain, I will be surprised.

Why would a NHS dentist be promoting Sensodyne, I dont go to the doctors and he tells me not to take supermarket brand pain killers.

They state whats in the tablets, they are all the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you need to watch more adverts.

 

sensodynye's usp is it helps painful teeth, other toothpaste's do not make these claims. presumably it's to do with the formulation. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, El Cid said:

I am 59 so my teeth/gums are not too good. The dentist will tell me to put Sensodyne toothpaste on my teeth to help to relieve my pain.

To me this is just like being fobbed off. Why would one particular brand of toothpaste help?

If anyone can say what is in this toothpaste, that relieves my pain, I will be surprised.

Why would a NHS dentist be promoting Sensodyne, I dont go to the doctors and he tells me not to take supermarket brand pain killers.

They state whats in the tablets, they are all the same.

It's not really that hard or surprising.  Sensodyne and other similar products contain a sedative ingredient, potassium nitrate, which other brands don't.

 

There is quite a lot of information about it and some of the the academic trials on the internet.

 

If you have been recommended it by a medical expert I don't see any harm in giving it a try or at least finding off-brand alternative containing that ingredient which not all of them do.

 

Only if you try it and subsequently doesn't work can you go back and raise your suspicions with your dentist.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fully agree try it and see,not a lot to lose is it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colgate do a sensitive version as well. The boffins there managed to isolate a single pore (right word?) in a tooth under microscope and then find exactly the same spot after a week or so to prove the toothpaste does it's job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, ECCOnoob said:

It's not really that hard or surprising.  Sensodyne and other similar products contain a sedative ingredient, potassium nitrate, which other brands don't.

 

There is quite a lot of information about it and some of the the academic trials on the internet.

Thanks, I will get my magnifying glass out and read the boxes.

To warn consumers of the risks of potassium nitrate, the FDA requires every sensitive toothpaste carton using potassium nitrate to be clearly marked with a 4-week-use warning label.

 

https://sensitivetoothpaste.com/does-your-sensitive-toothpaste-contain-potassium-nitrate-a-key-ingredient-in-gunpowder/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, El Cid said:

Thanks, I will get my magnifying glass out and read the boxes.

To warn consumers of the risks of potassium nitrate, the FDA requires every sensitive toothpaste carton using potassium nitrate to be clearly marked with a 4-week-use warning label.

 

https://sensitivetoothpaste.com/does-your-sensitive-toothpaste-contain-potassium-nitrate-a-key-ingredient-in-gunpowder/

I’m pretty sure that you’ll use a tube of toothpaste in less than four weeks.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, El Cid said:

If anyone can say what is in this toothpaste, that relieves my pain, I will be surprised.

 

 

It's right there on Wikipedia?

 

Quote

Sensodyne toothpastes work in different ways depending on the product's active ingredient - potassium nitrate, strontium acetate/chloride.

 

Potassium nitrate: The potassium ion hyperpolarizes[3] the nerve and stops it from firing. The nerve impulses are thus desensitized and there is no pain.

Strontium acetate and strontium chloride: These compounds share a similar chemical structure to calcium. Strontium based toothpastes (acetate and chloride) are therefore able to replace some of the lost calcium and block the exposed tubules in the dentinal tissue. This helps prevent the movement of the fluid within the tubules in response to a sensitivity stimulus that could otherwise cause tooth pain.

 

Some Sensodyne products contain calcium sodium phosphosilicate CSPS (Novamin), which appears to help with tooth sensitivity.[5][6] A randomized clinical trial published in 2015 demonstrated that dentifrices containing 5% CSPS may have the potential to mineralize and occlude the dentine in the oral environment.[7][8] Sensodyne has removed the calcium sodium phosphosilicate from their US products

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, El Cid said:

Thanks, I will get my magnifying glass out and read the boxes.

To warn consumers of the risks of potassium nitrate, the FDA requires every sensitive toothpaste carton using potassium nitrate to be clearly marked with a 4-week-use warning label.

 

https://sensitivetoothpaste.com/does-your-sensitive-toothpaste-contain-potassium-nitrate-a-key-ingredient-in-gunpowder/

The FDA is the US Regulator.    In any event, I really wouldn't concern yourself too much Sensodyne is on the list of approved products for use of potassium nitrate as set by own UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority.

 

I recommend you simply buy the genuine product as recommended by your dentist and give it a try as they must have some confidence that it will solve your issue.

 

I wouldn't spend too long trying to find 1001 different alternatives with the same ingredient from dodgy Dave's market stall as there are some known fakes out there which actually are toxic. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ECCOnoob said:

The FDA is the US Regulator.    In any event, I really wouldn't concern yourself too much Sensodyne is on the list of approved products for use of potassium nitrate as set by own UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority.

 

I recommend you simply buy the genuine product as recommended by your dentist and give it a try as they must have some confidence that it will solve your issue.

 

I wouldn't spend too long trying to find 1001 different alternatives with the same ingredient from dodgy Dave's market stall as there are some known fakes out there which actually are toxic. 

 

100ml of Sensodyne retails at about £4.

 

100 ml of Sainsbury’s sensitive toothpaste retails at £1.

 

Same active ingredients.

 

Make up your own mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/09/2020 at 14:54, El Cid said:

I am 59 so my teeth/gums are not too good. The dentist will tell me to put Sensodyne toothpaste on my teeth to help to relieve my pain.

To me this is just like being fobbed off. Why would one particular brand of toothpaste help?

If anyone can say what is in this toothpaste, that relieves my pain, I will be surprised.

Why would a NHS dentist be promoting Sensodyne, I dont go to the doctors and he tells me not to take supermarket brand pain killers.

They state whats in the tablets, they are all the same.

Did it occur to you to ask the dentist at the time?  If anyone can tell you what it is in the toothpaste that relieves pain I’m sure they can.

 

Or did you not take that opportunity because you were too busy planning starting this thread to do the obvious thing?

 

 

Edited by Arnold_Lane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Arnold_Lane said:

Did it occur to you to ask the dentist at the time?  If anyone can tell you what it is in the toothpaste that relieves pain I’m sure they can.

Or did you not take that opportunity because you were too busy planning starting this thread to do the obvious thing?

Maybe I was in PAIN

 

One puts a lot more thought into things when sat at home. It has crossed my mind, that pain is good for you.  Everytime you get toothache, you should think whether you can eat healthier.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.