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Coronavirus - Part Two.

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17 minutes ago, Thirsty Relic said:

Listening to the Government's info slot tonight from 5pm on BBC, they really confused me.  Previously, they had said that you  got your immunity from 2 doses of the vaccine and that they protected you from the virus and its variants. 

 

Tonight one of them said we'd also need a vaccine "top-up" in the Autumn to beat these variants, and that we may need an annual Covid jab on top of that.  So, if we sign up to the vaccine, it means 3 jabs this year, and annual top-ups from then on?

If you have the flu vaccine and its the right varriant, its around 50% effective. If its a different variant, the vaccines effectivness is very poor, maybe around 20%

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3 hours ago, El Cid said:

The Oxford trial found with two doses its vaccine was 62% effective.

The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is much cheaper, although neither the UK nor the US can match the EU’s $2.15 deal: they are expecting to pay about $3 and $4, respectively, per dose.

South Africa’s government found itself on the defensive this week after a senior health official revealed that 1.5 million doses of the Oxford and AstraZeneca vaccine just purchased for use among health workers would cost $5.25 (£3.84; €4.32) a dose, more than twice what the European Union is paying at $2.15.

The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine is much cheaper, with the company saying it will cost the government "the same as a cup of coffee". Sky News understands it will cost a little under £3 per dose, with two doses needed.

 

https://www.bmj.com/content/372/bmj.n281

 

Final data from the Pfizer vaccine found it offers 95% protection against the virus after two doses.

Pfizer, at $20 (£15)

 

If you read a news article, then another, each article gives a different effectivness and price.

 

https://news.sky.com/story/covid-19-vaccines-how-do-the-moderna-and-pfizer-coronavirus-jab-candidates-compare-12134062

You seem to be missing the point made as to why its better to go for a mix and not just one vaccine alone that may be 95% effective! The first link also states that the UK has basically spent money on "securing 267 million doses of five different types, according to the National Audit Office.2."

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El Cid,

 

"Which one would that be".

Based on this and my own reading.

My choice would be mRNA. That's the one I got.

But you don't get a choice.

Side effects caused by either  one of the vaccine being dished out;

appear to me to be innocuous-accept for sever allergic reaction.

 A major consideration for me,when studying which vaccine would I like to get, has been the T/B cell activation  by the vaccines.

 

 

https://www.ouh.nhs.uk/working-for-us/staff/covid-staff-faqs-vaccine.aspx

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-020-01194-5

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2814-7

Edited by petemcewan

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3 hours ago, petemcewan said:

El Cid,

 

"Which one would that be".

Based on this and my own reading.

My choice would be mRNA. That's the one I got.

But you don't get a choice.

Side effects caused by either  one of the vaccine being dished out;

appear to me to be innocuous-accept for sever allergic reaction.

 A major consideration for me,when studying which vaccine would I like to get, has been the T/B cell activation  by the vaccines.

 

 

https://www.ouh.nhs.uk/working-for-us/staff/covid-staff-faqs-vaccine.aspx

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-020-01194-5

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2814-7

 

B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes are the basics of how the body protects itself from viruses and how vaccinations work and any study or trial would be based around their appearance, stimulation by vaccine and production in the body, effectiveness and longevity. 

 

Not sure why you have selected theses two Springer Nature articles from the dozens of available articles on the progress of early vaccination trials from this and other publications. Is there something significantly novel about these two trials? The estimated study date for completion of the trials are March and August so any approval for use in the form of vaccines is months away.

 

Springer publications like Nature and Nature Medicine are not aimed at users like us, nor are they aimed at health professionals they are for researchers to publish their progress/findings.

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Had my covid jab 4th of Feb its the Oxford one big mistake feel so rough headaches cough high temp skin rashes muscle cramps just getting through worse now thank god anyone else had reactions speaking to doctor today see if its worth getting second jab put me right off I know getting covid itself could be worse just felt so bad with jab

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6 hours ago, apelike said:

You seem to be missing the point made as to why its better to go for a mix and not just one vaccine alone that may be 95% effective! The first link also states that the UK has basically spent money on "securing 267 million doses of five different types, according to the National Audit Office.2."

So using what we have already paid for, rather than clinical need. I know we are in the middle of a pandemic, but maybe the best way to recover from that is to find the best available and use that one?

Some of the medical companies are working on a non-profit basis, so get the best vaccine and make more of that one.

1 hour ago, Annie Bynnol said:

Springer publications like Nature and Nature Medicine are not aimed at users like us, nor are they aimed at health professionals they are for researchers to publish their progress/findings.

Not sure what users like us is, but I wouldnt trust publications aimed at Sun/Mail readers.

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Everyone seems to be hanging on for Boris's Big Broadcast on Monday. Will he outline a way forward, or will he fudge it and say that he will wait for the scientists?. Presumably the Brothers Grimm - that will have everyone on the edge of their seats.

 

Come the unlocking there will no doubt be joy at being able to have that pint, that nice meal with a few friends, even delight at being able to shop for shoes and handbags...... And business owners will be anxious to restart their activities. 

 

But spare a thought for their employees. For those not on furlough for the last few months they have perhaps been servicing mail order clients, or preparing food for sale 'at the door'. All in a Covid safe environment. Next month they may all have to deal with an influx of several dozen customers a day, perhaps table service and pot washing as well.

 

It may be  a nervous transition.   

Edited by Cyclecar
punctuation

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My husband and I have both had ours, Astra Zeneca  both had no side effects at all  My friend had Pfizer and she had no side effects

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I know several people who've had the jab and only two had side effects.

My Dad suffered a bit for a few days but we guessed that may be due to him already having had covid last February.

 

Have you had your paracetamol and eaten a little?

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1 hour ago, Hans-solo said:

Had my covid jab 4th of Feb its the Oxford one big mistake feel so rough headaches cough high temp skin rashes muscle cramps just getting through worse now thank god anyone else had reactions speaking to doctor today see if its worth getting second jab put me right off I know getting covid itself could be worse just felt so bad with jab

Sorry to hear you've had some adverse reactions. Whilst this won't help you - have you reported them on the Government website? Any information could be useful to help others in the future.

 

https://yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk/

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I can't understand people anticipating Boris's big announcements on Monday 22nd.  We already know most of it as he has, as usual, leaked it all to the press, and even told us much of it yesterday.  Schools to reopen on the 9th of March, non-essential shops shortly afterwards, April 1st re-opening of hospitality for outdoors service (been gardens etc).  No mention of pubs though.

 

Boris said that we would end lockdown when the top 4 tiers had all had the opportunity to be vaccinated.  That target has been reached, as announced officially yesterday.  Deaths, hospital admissions, r number etc are all dropping steadily.  We're now waiting another week for the "grand announcement", and he'll be judged on that.

 

 

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Annie Bynnol

There isn't very much I disagree with you on.

 

A major challenge for vaccine makers is to come up with a vaccine which stimulates lasting immunity.

 

As far as I can determine-by distilling knowledge from what I read,is the following.

Immunogenicity was noticed as an unexpected side effect from giving animals mRNA. Vaccine developers have run with it from there. Not with the animals I might add.

 

The mobilising of the Adaptive  Immune system by the mRNA vaccine is what should confer some lasting immunity.  

 

And that is why I'm glad I had the mRNA shot.

 

Note: A robust innate immune response can clear a virus relatively quickly in an infected person ,but can leave them without much  lasting immunity.

 

mRNA is the most stripped down vector you can imagine. Consequently you do not run into so much immune  response to the vector trouble. Which can be

a problem on repeat dosing with other vaccines.

 

So now I want my second dose.

Edited by petemcewan

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