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13 hours ago, Lex Luthor said:

Eid Mubarak, Friendly Muslim.

 

Please could you tell me what is the difference between the two types of Eid?    And what do they both signify?

 

For example, in Christianity, the two main festivals are Christmas - signifying the birth of Christ, and Easter - signifying the Resurrection of Christ.  

 

Also, does Ramadan only come before one of the two types of Eid, or both?

 

Also, why do different Muslims have Eid on different days sometimes?

 

Thank you in advance.

Hi again Lex Luthor – many, many thanks for your kind wishes and even more thanks for asking such good questions.

 

We’ll start with a historical account of the what the Holy Prophet Muhammad (ﷺ - salutations and peace be upon him) said about  the two Eids:

 

“When the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ - salutations and peace be upon him) came to Medina, the people had two days on which they engaged in games. He asked: What are these two days (what is the significance)? They said: We used to engage ourselves on them in the pre-Islamic period. The Messenger of Allah (ﷺ- salutations and peace be upon him) said: Allah has substituted for them something better than them, the day of sacrifice and the day of the breaking of the fast.”

 

The above account defines that Muslims have two days of celebration:

  • The ‘day of sacrifice’ is referred to as Eid-ul-Adha. This is when Muslims remember the ultimate, monumental sacrifice Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) was willing to make when he offered to sacrifice his beloved son, the Prophet Ismail (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace), following receipt of the command through successive divinely-inspired dreams. After he and his son had both proven their intent to comply, Allah stopped them from actually carrying out the sacrificing (or killing) and ordered Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) to sacrifice a ram as a celebration for passing this extreme test of obedience. This Eid coincides with the days of Hajj, which is a larger celebration of the efforts and obedience of Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) and his family. This topic probably justifies a post in itself.
  • The ‘day of the breaking of the fast’ is referred to as Eid-ul-Fitr (this is the one that has just passed). This succeeds the month of fasting (Ramadhan) and is basically the 1st date of the lunar month that follows Ramadhan.

Although the two days occur in different contexts, the activities undertaken on the days themselves are quite similar; a morning prayer and then general festivities and dining. There is special emphasis on sacrificing livestock on Eid-ul-Adha and sharing some of the meat with the poor.

 

Your final question was about why Muslims celebrate the Eid on different days. In reality, this is all down to the phasing of the moon and when the new moon is sighted (since the Islamic months are lunar, and a new month starts with each new moon). On this basis, the new month can potentially commence in different parts of the world on different days, although probably not in the same country, which is what you have obviously observed.

 

This year, Eid-ul-Fitr has been celebrated on the same day throughout in the UK, and almost everywhere in the whole world, which is a very rare occurence. I see this as a special gift for us this year; while coronavirus has separated us physically, Allah has brought us together spiritually.

 

I hope this answers your queries. Thanks again for your time and questions.

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6 minutes ago, blackydog said:

How are these fellow followers permitted to kill each other within the teachings of the Quran?

Can this EVER be resolved?

 

Hello again blackydog,

 

In simple terms I would suggest that these 'fellow followers' are NOT 'permitted to kill each other within the teachings of the Quran.' The Sunni-Shia issue, which you are referring to obviously, actually started as a very superficial issue. It took decades to develop into a major political problem and then centuries to develop into a widespread violent issue. And it all happened after the Holy Quran was revealed and fully compiled.

 

It is an unfortunate issue. It can be resolved, and I hope it does get resolved as soon as possible.

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Thank you for your answers, Friendly Muslim.  That's very enlightening.

 

Is the sacrifice referring to the same individuals who appear in the Bible, when God tells Abraham to sacrifice a ram in place of his son, Isaac?

 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Lex Luthor said:

Thank you for your answers, Friendly Muslim.  That's very enlightening.

 

Is the sacrifice referring to the same individuals who appear in the Bible, when God tells Abraham to sacrifice a ram in place of his son, Isaac?

 

 

 

 

I think you have got that a little wrong Lex Luthor

 

C&P

But the angel of the LORD called out to him from heaven, "Abraham! Abraham!" "Here I am," he replied.
12
"Do not lay a hand on the boy," he said. "Do not do anything to him. Now I know that you fear God, because you have not withheld from me your son, your only son."
13
Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram [1] caught by its horns. He went over and took the ram and sacrificed it as a burnt offering instead of his son.
 
http://web.mit.edu/jywang/www/cef/Bible/NIV/NIV_Bible/GEN+22.html

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Lex may have got his details wrong, but the answer to his question is "Yes". Eid-ul-Adha is celebrating the same incident that is also illustrated in the bible.

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Lex Luthor said:

Thank you for your answers, Friendly Muslim.  That's very enlightening.

 

Is the sacrifice referring to the same individuals who appear in the Bible, when God tells Abraham to sacrifice a ram in place of his son, Isaac?

 

 

 

 

Hi Lex Luthor (I'm glad you found my post enlightening), and hello kidley and enntee,

 

The story of the offering of Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) is similar in the currently available Bible and the Holy Quran. The key difference is that the Holy Quran states that the son that Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) offered was Prophet Ismail (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) and not Prophet Ishaq (Isaac) (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace).

 

I hadn’t read the current Biblical verses in detail before so thanks to kidley for contributing.

 

Obviously, which son was offered is an important detail, but the key message of both versions of the story is that Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) was extremely obedient to Allah, along with his son (it is clear from the Holy Quran that Prophet Ismail (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) was fully aware of what was happening – see quote below), and Allah rewarded them for their obedience and compliance and, of course, did not let any harm come to either of his beloved slaves.

 

Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) is referred to as the ‘Khalil’ of Allah in Islam and in the Holy Quran, which he means ‘intimate, or very close, friend’ of Allah.

 

For your interest, I have quoted below an epic passage of the Holy Quran that describes the incident:

 

“And, when he (his son) was old enough to walk with him, he said: "O my son! I have seen in a dream that I am slaughtering you. So look what you think!'' He said: "O my father! Do that which you are commanded, if Allah wills, you shall find me of the patient.'' Then, when they had both submitted themselves, and he had laid him prostrate on his forehead; We called out to him: "O Ibrahim!'' "You have fulfilled the dream!'' Verily, thus do We reward the doers of good. Verily, that indeed was a manifest trial. And We ransomed him with a great sacrifice; And We left for him among the later generations. "Salam (peace!) be upon Ibrahim!'' Thus indeed do We reward the doers of good. Verily, he was one of Our believing servants.”

 

Thanks for reading!

Edited by Friendly Muslim

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21 hours ago, Friendly Muslim said:

Hello again blackydog,

 

In simple terms I would suggest that these 'fellow followers' are NOT 'permitted to kill each other within the teachings of the Quran.' The Sunni-Shia issue, which you are referring to obviously, actually started as a very superficial issue. It took decades to develop into a major political problem and then centuries to develop into a widespread violent issue. And it all happened after the Holy Quran was revealed and fully compiled.

 

It is an unfortunate issue. It can be resolved, and I hope it does get resolved as soon as possible.

With all respect, I have to question your answer, where I think you have been economical with the explanation. If they are not permitted to kill each other within the teachings of the Quran, then why are they doing it? Surely they may as well have been drinking alcohol as to the notice they are taking of their (your) God? 

You also say it can be resolved but offer no suggestions as to how. After, as you say, centuries of disagreement and violence, there has been no advancement towards a resolution, then it could safely be argued there isn't going to be one any time soon.  

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6 hours ago, Friendly Muslim said:

Hi Lex Luthor (I'm glad you found my post enlightening), and hello kidley and enntee,

 

The story of the offering of Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) is similar in the currently available Bible and the Holy Quran. The key difference is that the Holy Quran states that the son that Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) offered was Prophet Ismail (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) and not Prophet Ishaq (Isaac) (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace).

 

I hadn’t read the current Biblical verses in detail before so thanks to kidley for contributing.

 

Obviously, which son was offered is an important detail, but the key message of both versions of the story is that Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) was extremely obedient to Allah, along with his son (it is clear from the Holy Quran that Prophet Ismail (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) was fully aware of what was happening – see quote below), and Allah rewarded them for their obedience and compliance and, of course, did not let any harm come to either of his beloved slaves.

 

Prophet Ibrahim (alaihis salaam – upon him be peace) is referred to as the ‘Khalil’ of Allah in Islam and in the Holy Quran, which he means ‘intimate, or very close, friend’ of Allah.

 

For your interest, I have quoted below an epic passage of the Holy Quran that describes the incident:

 

“And, when he (his son) was old enough to walk with him, he said: "O my son! I have seen in a dream that I am slaughtering you. So look what you think!'' He said: "O my father! Do that which you are commanded, if Allah wills, you shall find me of the patient.'' Then, when they had both submitted themselves, and he had laid him prostrate on his forehead; We called out to him: "O Ibrahim!'' "You have fulfilled the dream!'' Verily, thus do We reward the doers of good. Verily, that indeed was a manifest trial. And We ransomed him with a great sacrifice; And We left for him among the later generations. "Salam (peace!) be upon Ibrahim!'' Thus indeed do We reward the doers of good. Verily, he was one of Our believing servants.”

 

Thanks for reading!

Thank you.

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3 hours ago, blackydog said:

With all respect, I have to question your answer, where I think you have been economical with the explanation. If they are not permitted to kill each other within the teachings of the Quran, then why are they doing it? Surely they may as well have been drinking alcohol as to the notice they are taking of their (your) God? 

You also say it can be resolved but offer no suggestions as to how. After, as you say, centuries of disagreement and violence, there has been no advancement towards a resolution, then it could safely be argued there isn't going to be one any time soon.  

I would say muslims are killing each other in pitsmoor - nether edge ect, religious books are open to interpretation all imans have a wide view of the writings. (yes i know), you pick your own beliefs out of the preachings of any religion.

 

                                       shukria

 

                                   

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Unlike other holy books, the Koran acknowledges the above point about interpretation. 
 

In the third sura (roughly chapter) Allah says in one of his messages to the Prophet: “Some of its verses are definite in meaning - these are the  cornerstone of the scriptures - and others are ambiguous. The perverse at heart eagerly pursue the ambiguities in their attempt to make trouble and  to pin down a specific meaning of their own. Only God knows the true meaning.”  
 

This is to be expected.  It’s not a scientific text.  Any important text - religious, literary, philosophical - will be open to interpretation in different ways if you focus on single lines or verses. 

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, bendix said:

Unlike other holy books, the Koran acknowledges the above point about interpretation. 
 

In the third sura (roughly chapter) Allah says in one of his messages to the Prophet: “Some of its verses are definite in meaning - these are the  cornerstone of the scriptures - and others are ambiguous. The perverse at heart eagerly pursue the ambiguities in their attempt to make trouble and  to pin down a specific meaning of their own. Only God knows the true meaning.”  
 

This is to be expected.  It’s not a scientific text.  Any important text - religious, literary, philosophical - will be open to interpretation in different ways if you focus on single lines or verses. 

Do you then agree that stating that the texts are a historical accounts is also open to interpretation as they may in fact be wrong.

Edited by apelike

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11 hours ago, bendix said:

Unlike other holy books, the Koran acknowledges the above point about interpretation. 
 

In the third sura (roughly chapter) Allah says in one of his messages to the Prophet: “Some of its verses are definite in meaning - these are the  cornerstone of the scriptures - and others are ambiguous. The perverse at heart eagerly pursue the ambiguities in their attempt to make trouble and  to pin down a specific meaning of their own. Only God knows the true meaning.”  
 

This is to be expected.  It’s not a scientific text.  Any important text - religious, literary, philosophical - will be open to interpretation in different ways if you focus on single lines or verses. 

As those holy texts have been handed down (to earth) and are deliberately ambiguous with the true meaning being withheld, then it is no surprise that readers have no other option but to invent their own interpretations without hope of clarification.  What then, is the point?

 

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