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55 minutes ago, carosio said:

I had a Gloops badge, AND it was a brass one with blue enamel!

Bigeard!

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Left Sheffield for Canada in 1980. At most businesses in Canada over 50% of employees have english as there second language so accents were many and varied. At one company I worked with 3 other Yorkshire men.  Our usual greetings went something like this....................

Ayup,...Ayup.....Sup wi thee.....nowt...... awlreight .......alsithi.    We got many strange looks from the other employees but explained to them that this was the way we communicated in Gods own country.

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13 hours ago, trastrick said:

Bigeard!

He's just gobbing off.

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Posted (edited)

He's a lairy b*, the nowt else.

 

I could a 'ad a brass'n anall, bur it were  a twist!

 

(Translation 1.  He's just showing off!, The brass one cost too much, it wasn't worth it.)

 

(Translation 2.  I'm jealous.)

Edited by trastrick

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Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, carosio said:

I had a Gloops badge, AND it was a brass one with blue enamel!

Here are two of 'em - most on us 'ad the ordinary 'uns! https://i.postimg.cc/MKdK4XFt/Gloops.jpg

Edited by hillsbro

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Actually (as teenagers) we formed a club; we put out a request through The Star for readers to donate badges and I ended up with the enamel one. Someone craftily purloined it though and I never saw it again.

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If it was possible to go back to the early 1800s or later in Sheffield , you would find it hard to understand the heavy accent that was spoken then.

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28 minutes ago, lazarus said:

If it was possible to go back to the early 1800s or later in Sheffield , you would find it hard to understand the heavy accent that was spoken then.

How do you know this - curious.

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Back in the 50s, I worked with a lot of people from local outlying areas.

 

We knew where they were from, by their accents.

 

Rotherham,  Barnsley, Bawtry, Hathersage, Chesterfield and Stocksbridge.  (Try that today)

 

Example Bawtry:  "Is thy is, Li?"

 

Translation, "How are you Lionel?"

 

 

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Posted (edited)

An oddity seems to exist in the Barnsley and Stocksbridge areas, where "oo" sometimes changes to "ooi", for example "Get thi booits on - tha't on afternooins". 🙂

Edited by hillsbro

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1 hour ago, hillsbro said:

An oddity seems to exist in the Barnsley and Stocksbridge areas, where "oo" sometimes changes to "ooi", for example "Get thi booits on - tha't on afternooins". 🙂

I used to be manager of a menswear shop (Jacksons the Tailors) in Barnsley in 1970, often blokes would come in asking for "a leet cooit" ( a light coat).

We lived in Barnsley at the time and our neighbour used to say, "git bairn some o' these sooer eyes ave baked thi, these is sooer eyes and these is sooer eyes baht jam".

Translated: macaroons with or without jam.

Duffems

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Posted (edited)

Grandma baked her bread and pies without a reseet. (receipt) meaning recipe!  :)

Edited by trastrick

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