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Nostalgia In The Old Neighbourhood

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Same here Randall St (proper houses) now Randall place is long gone. when we've been with any of the Grand kids we try to work out where our old house used to stand. 

My Gran's house is still there at Bocking lane and we again over the years have taken our kids and grandkids back played in Beauchief woods (Parkbank woods) and showed them our old haunts, Happy Daze.

We did take our kids (well some of them) back to Kilmarnock on my 50th (some years ago lol) to see the old house and again found various wooded areas playgrounds etc that i could remember from my youth. 

The many Woods & Parks of Sheffield and its closeness to open country side bring back many fond memories of growing up in Sheff. 

It was nice to visit my old School of Sharrow Lane a while back and actually go inside as there is a cafe there in what used to be the dining hall.

I could almost taste the Cheese flan (with a tomato in it of course) and lumpy custard from my school days - LOL

 

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Left Sheffield 40 years ago but have been back many times over the years. Each visit seems more alien and less nostalgic to me.  Special places from my childhood were Spital Lane and Petre St in Pitsmoor. Both long gone. We moved to Woodhouse which was a small quiet village which has seen massive change in that time frame. After getting married we moved to Swallownest. Since we left there the A57 and the Rother valley park have caused massive changes to the area and I still struggle to find my way around when attempting to drive myself around.

I worked at Davy United, Ashlows and Dunford Hadfields all of which no longer exist. Also I visited a few of the local steel mills and my father worked for the NCB. Steel and coal industry in the area are now almost non existant. So therefore there is little left for me to be nostalgic about.

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I find it very odd.  We moved to Bradway to a new build semi in 1952 when I was 2.  Whilst it is 70 years  old it looks very  dated but not ancient.  My Gran's house, a terrace with bay window in Crooks,  was built in 1904.  In all my living memory it seemed an ancient house. 

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A few years ago I drove past the house where i grew up and saw it was for sale. I obtained a brochure and saw how much it had been changed.

Whilst it is interesting to see a former well-known place, I'm sure it can be boring if there's someone with you. Three years ago I visited a town where I used to spend my school holidays. I'd not been back for 25 years.

There's another place I've not been to in a much longer time. Google Streetview can be very useful!

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I visit my old neighbourhood  from time to time when I go for walking gear or to the opticians, I used to live on Thorp Road, Highfields. The old houses were demolished around the late sixties, but the new ones were built on the same footprint of the road, with Alderson Road at the top, and Hill Street at the bottom. Woodhead Road the next road along still has the old houses standing on one side of it, so that when I walk up Thorp Close, as it is now called,I try to place where our old house used to stand by looking across at the houses on Woodhead Road, and also by the distance up to Alderson Road, but without much success.

It was a great road to grow up on, with lots of good friends and loads of characters among the adults. It seems a little soulless now, the old road was full of life. Still I've got many very good memories of the area from my childhood and I often remember them. A clever man once said "The past is a foreign country". How right he was!

 

One other detail occurs to me. When I was in junior school at Sharrow Lane, we were asked by one the teachers write down the name of our road. I of course wrote Thorp Road. The teacher brought me to the front of the class and informed them that I couldn't spell the name of my own road correctly and that it should end with an e as in Thorpe. I insisted that I was right, and she insisted that I was not. She was so adamant that I was wrong, she sent a classmate home with me to look at the street sign. This of course proved her wrong, however I can't remember her apologising.

 

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Hi all, looking for some funny childhood memories for my book on sheffield....Anyone got any old photos or stories... war stories in the city etc... for me to put in it?  Very grateful for any help, and happy to send a free book for selected stories or photos....ps photos must be yours.

 

Thanks from 

 

Soyouknow books

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I hope this story is of interest to you.

My mum Enid Tidy now sadly deceased was born in 1923 and lived in Coleford Road  she was bombed  out on the Sunday night of the Sheffield blitz. Unfortunately I do not know the names of everyone involved because mum related the story to us as children and time takes its toll.

When the  alarm was sounded the next door neighbours asked   if they could come in to my mum's parents shelter,  because their shelter was flooded and it was agreed they could. A landmine scored a direct hit on my mum's house and everyone in the shelter was knocked to the floor. My granddad asked them all to state if they were ok and they all said yes but the next door neighbour had lost his false teeth,they were later found still clenched in a piece of malt loaf.

The neighbours to the other side stayed in their front room and were found the next day all were dead.

The ARP wardens shelter across the road was destroyed and all but one of the wardens were killed.The survivor was apparently stood in the doorway and was blown to safety.

My uncles Sidney and George had spent the raid in the cellars of the Darnall Liberal club and at the all clear decided to go sightseeing but did not see any bomb damage until they came to the bottom of their road.

My Granddad was an ambulance man at Davy's and my uncles said there was bandages all over the road it looked as though the debris had been trimmed up.

My mum's dog Pat dug himself out of the rubble and moved with the family to Motehall Road on the Manor then he disappeared and was found days later sitting on the rubble.

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On 15/03/2020 at 15:53, Thorpy said:

When I was in junior school at Sharrow Lane, we were asked by one the teachers write down the name of our road. I of course wrote Thorp Road. The teacher brought me to the front of the class and informed them that I couldn't spell the name of my own road correctly and that it should end with an e as in Thorpe. I insisted that I was right, and she insisted that I was not. She was so adamant that I was wrong, she sent a classmate home with me to look at the street sign. This of course proved her wrong, however I can't remember her apologising.

 

Thorpy, you went to to the wrong school. You should have gone to St Barnabas's like me. I lived on Alderson Road, the bit that's on the other side of Bramall Lane.

 

post-188-1221039677.jpg

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Jim, it was a great area to grow up in wasn't it?

You went Alderson Road school then. My mates and me used to go to the Cubs there and on Church Parade to St. Barnabas church, in the hope that we would get to parade through the streets in our cub uniforms.

It's strange, one lad on our road went to Alderson Road school, and one went to Cecil Road (both connected to St. Barnabas I think), yet four of us off our road went to Sharrow Lane.

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2 hours ago, Thorpy said:

Jim, it was a great area to grow up in wasn't it?

You went Alderson Road school then. My mates and me used to go to the Cubs there and on Church Parade to St. Barnabas church, in the hope that we would get to parade through the streets in our cub uniforms.

It's strange, one lad on our road went to Alderson Road school, and one went to Cecil Road (both connected to St. Barnabas I think), yet four of us off our road went to Sharrow Lane.

Yes, it was the one on Alderson Road. I think it's a bed warehouse now. I went there from 1953 until we moved to Pitsmoor in 1955. My parents were married in St Barnabas's church. I think the only other school that was considered was Lowfield but my mother had been taught at Alderson Road so that's where I went. Both of them meant crossing Bramall Lane but unless I've misremembered, my mother took me on the first day and then I was on my own. At four years old! Perhaps I was taken there by older kids but I don't recall that being the case.

I do remember learning to tie my shoe laces for the first time in the playground. I was so chuffed that I started to run home with them undone so that I could show my mum what I could do but an older kid stopped me and insisted on tying them up for me. Funny what sticks in your mind.

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lI went back to my birth address, Chestnut AVE, Triangle and Maple Grove where my grandparents looked after me while my mother fulfilled her nursing duties at Firevale. and then Halesworth Road where we lived from 1946 - my father returned from serving with the army in India as it was in walking distance of Handsworth school. After he died, 1956, we moved to Larch Hill. I left there 1966 to work in London.

 

 

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Drove past the house where I lived in Crosspool and saw that another house has been built in the back garden.  Shed, garage, fruit and veg beds all gone.

 

 

 

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