Jump to content

Igloo Won't Pay For Your Meat Expenses

Recommended Posts

13 hours ago, ECCOnoob said:

You realise that more than one thing can be bad for the planet at once right? Or do you not believe that the current levels of UK meat consumption are unsustainable and are harming the planet? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 02/03/2020 at 07:51, Pettytom said:

That’s pretty outdated thinking.

 

Soon,  any company following a philosophy like yours will disappear up their own, badly maintained, exhaust pipe .

Businesses making profit is outdated thinking yeah right. If it's not profitable for the owners it's not sustainable and then they hit a bump in the road like brexit or coronavirus and then staff are being made redundant and out of a job. Business doesn't exist primarily to make an eco statement and to save the planet. They are there to be profitable employ staff and if they are lucky enough to do so they lend support to local charities and do some good within the local community.  That part is a privilege. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 01/03/2020 at 00:15, Pettytom said:

Absolutely not.

 

We’ve had companies in thrall to the profit motive for the last 70 years. That hasn’t worked out so well.

 

We need more companies like Igloo. More social responsibility. More nuance. 
 

Simply pursuing profit is for previous generations. The current generation have damage to repair.

We'll I hope Pettytom you prosper on your principals . I don't see the value in Igloos stance personally each to their own. It's a tough climate for businesses and with minimum/ living wage being hiked up by the government each year/pension costs/ ssp costs that businesses have to pay in full an employer is packing many punches to survive, never mind trying to make a decent profit. Lots of businesses are hanging on by the skin of their teeth in a tough market. Principals don't pay the wages and tax bill. Profitability does.

Edited by rachelmum
Spelling error

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rachelmum said:

We'll I hope Pettytom you prosper on your principals . I don't see the value in Igloos stance personally each to their own. It's a tough climate for businesses and with minimum/ living wage being hiked up by the government each year/pension costs/ ssp costs that businesses have to pay in full an employer is packing many punches to survive, never mind trying to make a decent profit. Lots of businesses are hanging on by the skin of their teeth in a tough market. Principals don't pay the wages and tax bill. Profitability does.

I wish you well in paying your staff fairly.

 

Please don’t expect the benefit system to bail you , or your company out.  So let’s not hear moaning about paying people a decent package.
 

What really pays the bills is forward planning and sustainability.  That’s the future 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Pettytom said:

I wish you well in paying your staff fairly.

 

Please don’t expect the benefit system to bail you , or your company out.  So let’s not hear moaning about paying people a decent package.
 

What really pays the bills is forward planning and sustainability.  That’s the future 

You're not living in the real World.  Profit pays the bills. There is no future for any business that doesn't make a profit.  Greggs is a good example of a business that has forward planning. Their Vegan sausage roll has been a big success but Greggs have no plans to become a Vegan only business. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, rachelmum said:

We'll I hope Pettytom you prosper on your principals . I don't see the value in Igloos stance personally each to their own. It's a tough climate for businesses and with minimum/ living wage being hiked up by the government each year/pension costs/ ssp costs that businesses have to pay in full an employer is packing many punches to survive, never mind trying to make a decent profit. Lots of businesses are hanging on by the skin of their teeth in a tough market. Principals don't pay the wages and tax bill. Profitability does.

I hope he prospers in his principles too.

 

so should you if you want your kids and grandkids to have any kind of life unless you want to sacrifice it to champion “profit”.

Edited by makapaka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, rachelmum said:

We'll I hope Pettytom you prosper on your principals . I don't see the value in Igloos stance personally each to their own. It's a tough climate for businesses and with minimum/ living wage being hiked up by the government each year/pension costs/ ssp costs that businesses have to pay in full an employer is packing many punches to survive, never mind trying to make a decent profit. Lots of businesses are hanging on by the skin of their teeth in a tough market. Principals don't pay the wages and tax bill. Profitability does.

Fortunately for Igloo, a lot of people are searching out green and ethical business to give their custom to. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, West 77 said:

You're not living in the real World.  Profit pays the bills. There is no future for any business that doesn't make a profit.  Greggs is a good example of a business that has forward planning. Their Vegan sausage roll has been a big success but Greggs have no plans to become a Vegan only business. 

Profit doesn't pay the bills, it's what is left after the bills -including wages and employer contributions- have been paid.

 

But profit does pay (corporate) tax.

12 hours ago, Pettytom said:

I wish you well in paying your staff fairly.

 

Please don’t expect the benefit system to bail you , or your company out.  So let’s not hear moaning about paying people a decent package.
 

What really pays the bills is forward planning and sustainability.  That’s the future 

What really pays the bills is enough paying customers buying enough product/service over time.

 

Forward planning and sustainability (in a business context) is for maintaining enough paying customers buying enough product/service in the future.

 

Forward planning and sustainability (in an environmental context) is the responsibility of the legislator first, and all those subjected to their legislation next. Everyone can certainly bring their own stone to that particular edifice, and the more and the sooner the better. But unless doing so confers a marketing advantage, it doesn't pay the bills, it just helps the environment (allegedly).

Edited by L00b

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, L00b said:

Profit doesn't pay the bills, it's what is left after the bills -including wages and employer contributions- have been paid.

 

But profit does pay (corporate) tax.

Of course profit pays the bills.  There is obviously a difference between gross profit and net profit. If a business doesn't make a gross profit then they are not going  to pay any corporate tax.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎02‎/‎03‎/‎2020 at 18:51, Pettytom said:

That’s pretty outdated thinking.

 

Soon,  any company following a philosophy like yours will disappear up their own, badly maintained, exhaust pipe .

Unfortunately, I think that rachelmum is right about one thing - it's your thinking and mine that is unfashionable (if not outdated).

 

The idea that a company has any responsibility towards any of its stakeholders other than its shareholders [with the possible exception of its senior managers] was a product of the postwar consensus / settlement, and went out with the 1970s.

 

But it would be great if Igloo's actions are a harbinger of a return to that way of thinking (which was, of course, never accepted in all quarters).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, West 77 said:

Of course profit pays the bills.  There is obviously a difference between gross profit and net profit. If a business doesn't make a gross profit then they are not going  to pay any corporate tax.

'Bills' are *costs* (direct ones, ie of goods sold, which *includes* labour costs; and indirect ones).

 

Gross profit is what's left after the COGS is subtracted from the *turnover*.

 

Net profit is what's left after *expenses* are subtracted from the gross profit. In the context of this thread, I'd expect sales employees' meal expenses to be such indirect costs/expenses.

 

So no, profit does not 'of course pay the bills' as you claimed, and reclaimed. It pays only *some* of them, the proportion of which, relative to the total direct+indirect costs, will vary greatly according to the business type and size.

 

 

Edited by L00b

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, L00b said:

'Bills' are *costs* (direct ones, ie of goods sold, which *includes* labour costs; and indirect ones).

 

Gross profit is what's left after the COGS is subtracted from the *turnover*.

 

Net profit is what's left after *expenses* are subtracted from the gross profit. In the context of this thread, I'd expect sales employees' meal expenses to be such indirect costs/expenses.

 

So no, profit does not 'of course pay the bills' as you claimed, and reclaimed. It pays only *some* of them, the proportion of which, relative to the total direct+indirect costs, will vary greatly according to the business type and size.

 

 

It’s a total red herring the argument put forward by @rachelmum and @West 77 anyway.

 

theres no reason for this initiative to impact on a company’s profitability and even if it did - that would be their decision to take for the greater good of the environment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.