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Consequences Of Brexit [Part 9] Read First Post Before Posting

Groose

Let me make this perfectly clear - any personal attacks will get you a suspension. The moderating team is not going to continually issue warnings. If you cannot remain civil and post within forum rules then do not bother to contribute.

 

In addition to remoaner we are also not going to allow the use of libdums or liebore - if you cannot behave like adults and post without recourse to these childish insults then please refrain from posting. If you have a problem with this then you all know where the helpdesk is. 

Message added by Groose

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1 minute ago, Car Boot said:

The right wing of the Tory Party, 'Austerity Osbourne' and 'Cuts in benefits Cameron' supported our EU membership. These EU rich boys didn't do a lot of good for the working class. 

Good job you’ve jumped in with the ultra far right wing of the Tory party then. 
 

Much more compassionate 

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4 minutes ago, Car Boot said:

The right wing of the Tory Party, 'Austerity Osbourne' and 'Cuts in benefits Cameron' supported our EU membership. 

And the Tories in power now are well to the right of them.

 

Who is going to pay for all Sunak's borrowing? Who is bearing the brunt of the Tories crass handling of the Covid crisis?

 

Yup - workers / BME communities.

Edited by Longcol

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16 hours ago, El Cid said:

That is massive compared to staying in. If your company reduces its profits by 2%, that is a lot of money, over all the country.

Yes it is if businesses don’t take steps to mitigate some of the increases. We are a large business so can do that to a degree, more direct sourcing from the Asian factories, re-negotiation with EU suppliers and also potentially more sourcing from UK suppliers who may now be more competitive.

The problem is the UK’s manufacturing base is not what it could or should be, successive govt’s have failed to have an industrial policy as they chased services so hopefully this will change.
All of the above is more difficult for smaller businesses though.

One thing we are seeing is upwards pressure on wages in certain roles, many Eastern European workers have gone home due to Covid and we are having to pay higher wages for roles like HGV drivers due to the shortage of qualified people.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Westie1889 said:

Yes it is if businesses don’t take steps to mitigate some of the increases. We are a large business so can do that to a degree, more direct sourcing from the Asian factories, re-negotiation with EU suppliers and also potentially more sourcing from UK suppliers who may now be more competitive.

The problem is the UK’s manufacturing base is not what it could or should be, successive govt’s have failed to have an industrial policy as they chased services so hopefully this will change.
All of the above is more difficult for smaller businesses though.

One thing we are seeing is upwards pressure on wages in certain roles, many Eastern European workers have gone home due to Covid and we are having to pay higher wages for roles like HGV drivers due to the shortage of qualified people.

 

 

Once we are free of the EU's globalising agenda we can rebalance the economy towards productive industry and manufacturing and away from unproductive labour such as speculative financial services. A modern economy cannot provide for all if it doesn't have a long term manufacturing and industrial Base. Financial services provide a quick return for the few, a form of medieval alchemy of making money out of thin air in which production has no part to play but gambling on the money markets is its essence. No wonder financial collapse is always just around the corner when a society is reliant upon this form of money speculation. There must be strict controls on the export of capital to protect our currency and economy. 

 

Pressure to increase wages is excellent news for the worker - a direct benefit of Brexit. 'Getting on your bike' to look for work was exploitative and unacceptable when Norman Tebbit demanded unemployed workers move home to seek jobs elsewhere. Then under the EU and the dreadful Single Market it became the accepted norm for migrant workers, low pay and zero hours contracts. 

 

A labour market plan for full employment, skills development and high tech manufacturing can only happen once employers are deprived of their dependency on cheap unskilled European migrants. 

Edited by Car Boot

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1 hour ago, Car Boot said:

Financial services provide a quick return for the few, a form of medieval alchemy of making money out of thin air in which production has no part to play but gambling on the money markets is its essence. No wonder financial collapse is always just around the corner when a society is reliant upon this form of money speculation. There must be strict controls on the export of capital to protect our currency and economy.

Not sure what power the EU have over the London Stock market. One of my neighbours has recently bought a house in France, I guess that would be classed as export of capital in your view.

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15 hours ago, Car Boot said:

I think its interesting that a Remain voter actually care's about what may advantage the working class.

 

One thing that's become patently obvious since the referendum is the high level of disdain most remain voters have for the working class and the underclass.

 

Brexit was a working class revolt against the establishment that will advantage the working class by:

 

1. Ending the control of the unelected EU Commissioners and the anti-trade union, anti-worker, European Court of Justice. So Brexit frees our elected Parliament from the control of those we don’t elect.

 

2. It will advantage the working class by bringing our borders back under national control, enabling us to begin proper labour market planning. Free movement is a capitalist con trick that makes slaves and nomads of the poorest to suit the short term needs of big business.

 

3. We have the chance to rebalance the economy away from financial services to manufacturing and production. State aid, negotiating trade deals that benefit the UK, renationalising major utilities are ALL incompatible with membership of the Single Market. 

 

Simple fact is Car Boot, we now have your precious Brexit and it is looking like it will be a No Deal Brexit. I can rail against it all I want, it isn't going to change anything so I am looking for constructive dialogue. 

 

1. The EU Commission is made up of representatives of national governments, it is one of the strongest political organs on the planet and the UK chose to leave it's seat of power on that table. But I concede that a No Deal Brexit will give the UK back control over its own national affairs at the expense of international influence. 

 

2. This point I will never concede, the UK has had a low unemployment rate for decades. Reducing access to labour for the national market will act as a constraint, limiting the ability to be self sufficient. This will drive up cost for internally produced goods as well as force higher imports from other parts of the world. Factor in that the median average income per household in the UK has risen steadily year on year, 'despite' being in the EU. Chances are that this will now change - we will have to wait and see. 

 

3. Can you elaborate on this, as to me this is the interesting and rather crucial area of discussion that we need to have.

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7 hours ago, Car Boot said:

Once we are free of the EU's globalising agenda we can rebalance the economy towards productive industry and manufacturing and away from unproductive labour such as speculative financial services. A modern economy cannot provide for all if it doesn't have a long term manufacturing and industrial Base. Financial services provide a quick return for the few, a form of medieval alchemy of making money out of thin air in which production has no part to play but gambling on the money markets is its essence. No wonder financial collapse is always just around the corner when a society is reliant upon this form of money speculation. There must be strict controls on the export of capital to protect our currency and economy. 

 

Pressure to increase wages is excellent news for the worker - a direct benefit of Brexit. 'Getting on your bike' to look for work was exploitative and unacceptable when Norman Tebbit demanded unemployed workers move home to seek jobs elsewhere. Then under the EU and the dreadful Single Market it became the accepted norm for migrant workers, low pay and zero hours contracts. 

 

A labour market plan for full employment, skills development and high tech manufacturing can only happen once employers are deprived of their dependency on cheap unskilled European migrants. 

I work now, and have worked in the past, with European migrants in high tech manufacturing. They are nether cheap, and they most certainly aren't unskilled. Such a tired stereotype.

 

Manufacturing and engineering does not and cannot exist in a national bubble. Engineering companies need to have the ability to move material and people easily across national borders. 

Edited by Bargepole23

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12 hours ago, Car Boot said:

Once we are free of the EU's globalising agenda we can rebalance the economy towards productive industry and manufacturing and away from unproductive labour such as speculative financial services. A modern economy cannot provide for all if it doesn't have a long term manufacturing and industrial Base. Financial services provide a quick return for the few, a form of medieval alchemy of making money out of thin air in which production has no part to play but gambling on the money markets is its essence. No wonder financial collapse is always just around the corner when a society is reliant upon this form of money speculation. There must be strict controls on the export of capital to protect our currency and economy. 

 

Pressure to increase wages is excellent news for the worker - a direct benefit of Brexit. 'Getting on your bike' to look for work was exploitative and unacceptable when Norman Tebbit demanded unemployed workers move home to seek jobs elsewhere. Then under the EU and the dreadful Single Market it became the accepted norm for migrant workers, low pay and zero hours contracts. 

 

A labour market plan for full employment, skills development and high tech manufacturing can only happen once employers are deprived of their dependency on cheap unskilled European migrants. 

The global economy is not going away and it is not an EU agenda,

It is just a fact of life and to be part of a relatively strong trading bloc gives the U.K. the best opportunity to participate in world trade or to protect our economy and industry.

 Brexit and in particular a no deal Brexit puts us in a weaker position.

Itwill become obvious that the immigrant workers that we require the most will be those prepared to work in the essential industries such as agriculture and health care.

These will be the jobs that need filling and if not,these are the services that will have the most impact if we no longer welcome immigrant workers.

 

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On 18 October 2020 at 04:32, Westie1889 said:

Yes it is if businesses don’t take steps to mitigate some of the increases. We are a large business so can do that to a degree, more direct sourcing from the Asian factories, re-negotiation with EU suppliers and also potentially more sourcing from UK suppliers who may now be more competitive.

The problem is the UK’s manufacturing base is not what it could or should be, successive govt’s have failed to have an industrial policy as they chased services so hopefully this will change.
All of the above is more difficult for smaller businesses though.

(...)

The VAT regime post-Brexit should give them enough of a torrid time ;)

 

On the importing side, with the scrapping of the £15 exemption threshold, many EU27 OMPs are busy updating minimum order levels (>£135), and adjusting pricing for the extra form filling associated with collecting VAT for HMRC, for UK buyers from 1/1/21.

 

Edited by L00b

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On 18/10/2020 at 00:32, Car Boot said:

The right wing of the Tory Party, 'Austerity Osbourne' and 'Cuts in benefits Cameron' supported our EU membership. These EU rich boys didn't do a lot of good for the working class. 

Yeah, a shame the generous Left didn't get into power in 2010 isn't it?  

 

Alistair Darling: we will cut deeper than Margaret Thatcher
Thinktank warns of 'two parliaments of pain' with spending slashed by 25% to repair black hole in finances

 

Quote

Alistair Darling admitted tonight that Labour's planned cuts in public spending will be "deeper and tougher" than Margaret Thatcher's in the 1980s, as the country's leading experts on tax and spending warned that Britain faces "two parliaments of pain" to repair the black hole in the state's finances.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2010/mar/25/alistair-darling-cut-deeper-margaret-thatcher

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Moody’s downgrades UK credit rating:

https://www.ft.com/content/117349e4-dc95-4509-969b-26dcdede1773

 

"Moody’s said it believed growth would be 'meaningfully weaker' than it had previously believed and that the country’s economy had been struggling even before the pandemic reached Britain.

 

The agency also specifically pointed to what it called 'the weakening in the UK’s institutions and governance'."

 

You know things are bad when even the ratings agencies start flagging up the deliberate damage being done to the UK’s institutions and system of governance.

Edited by Magilla

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