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Consequences Of Brexit [Part 9] Read First Post Before Posting

Vaati

Let me make this perfectly clear - any personal attacks will get you a suspension. The moderating team is not going to continually issue warnings. If you cannot remain civil and post within forum rules then do not bother to contribute.

 

In addition to remoaner we are also not going to allow the use of libdums or liebore - if you cannot behave like adults and post without recourse to these childish insults then please refrain from posting. If you have a problem with this then you all know where the helpdesk is. 

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8 hours ago, Magilla said:

Mr.Perkes  was interviewed again a couple of months ago, his views haven't changed :?

Not everyone in the industry agrees with him though...

Barry Young, Managing Director, Brixham Trawler Agents said:

“2021 saw a record year for the world famous Brixham Fish Market. Despite the pandemic and rumours around the impact of Brexit we have seen both our sales to domestic markets and exports to the EU increase nicely. With over £43.5m worth of sales taking place in 2021, we are expecting 2022 to be an even bigger year.

The combination of life outside of the EU and the pandemic has ensured that we have diversified our markets and looked to new opportunities. From increasing our domestic market sales to being well prepared for any bureaucratic changes, Brixham Fish market has shown that there is a positive story to tell and it is well reflected in these record sales numbers.

We are looking to see Brixham build upon this success and with some extra investment from the Fisheries and Seafood Scheme and Levelling Up Fund, we can continue to support this noble industry and this historic coastal community.”

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Posted (edited)
On 06/01/2022 at 18:08, sadbrewer said:

Not everyone in the industry agrees with him though...

Barry Young, Managing Director, Brixham Trawler Agents said:

“2021 saw a record year for the world famous Brixham Fish Market. Despite the pandemic and rumours around the impact of Brexit we have seen both our sales to domestic markets and exports to the EU increase nicely. With over £43.5m worth of sales taking place in 2021, we are expecting 2022 to be an even bigger year.”

On the face of it that does sound like good news. However, prior to Brexit just over a third of UK catches were landed outside the UK, so it's inevitable domestic sales would increase.

 

The proof of the pudding, given the significant rise in costs and red tape, is whether those increased sales ultimately lead to increased profit.

 

Doesn't seem to be any published info on that as yet, for some reason :roll:

 

 

Edited by Magilla

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Brexit is being credited for a big growth in the British cheese industry.  This was discussed on Dragon's Den.  Brexit has brought about new opportunities for British business.

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3 hours ago, West 77 said:

Brexit is being credited for a big growth in the British cheese industry.  This was discussed on Dragon's Den.  Brexit has brought about new opportunities for British business.

You are talking out of your backside.

 

Again.

 

Brexit is being credited with a big collapse in the British cheese industry.

 

One British cheesemaker says the lack of a trade deal has lost him  £250,000 of business due to the additional paperwork and health certificates required,  which requires a £180 health certificate on a £30 gift pack of cheese.

 

And as for so-called "emerging markets" including Canada and Norway, those counties' duties are in excess of 200%, amounting to £178 extra on a £50 gift pack, and £190 on a £30 gift pack.

 

Read it and weep:

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/dec/27/brexit-the-biggest-disaster-that-any-government-has-ever-negotiated

Brexit: ‘the biggest disaster any government has ever negotiated’

Exclusive: British cheesemaker says Brexit and subsequent trade deals have cost his firm £270,000


A British cheesemaker who predicted Brexit would cost him hundreds of thousands of pounds in exports has called the UK’s departure from the EU single market a disaster, after losing his entire wholesale and retail business in the bloc over the past year. Simon Spurrell, the co-founder of the Cheshire Cheese Company, said personal advice from a government minister to pursue non-EU markets to compensate for his losses had proved to be “an expensive joke”

 

It turns out our greatest competitor on the planet is the UK government because every time they do a fantastic deal, they kick us out of that market – starting with the Brexit deal,” he said.

 

Spurrell predicted in January that Brexit would cost him £250,000 in sales. “We lost £270,000, so I got one thing right,” he said, describing the post-Brexit EU trade deal as the “biggest disaster that any government has ever negotiated in the history of trade negotiations”.

 

His online retail business was hit immediately after the Brexit negotiator David Frost failed to secure a frictionless trade deal addressing sales to individual customers in the EU.

 

Spurrell said he had lost 20% of sales overnight after discovering he needed to provide a £180 health certificate on each order, including gift packs costing £25 or £30. He said the viability of his online retail had come to a “dead stop”.

 

After he embarked on a personal crusade to draw attention to the plight of UK exporters involving almost 200 media interviews around the world, he was invited to an online meeting with Victoria Prentis, a minister at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. She suggested that emerging markets could compensate for the Brexit-related hole in the Cheshire Cheese Company’s finances.

 

Spurrell said he had pursued new business in Norway and Canada but post-Brexit trade deals sealed by the government had put barriers in place.

“We no longer have any ability to deal with the EU as our three distributors in Germany, France and Italy have said we have become too expensive because of the new checks and paperwork.

 

“And now we’ve also lost Norway since the trade deal, as duty for wholesale is 273%. Then we tried Canada but what the government didn’t tell us is that duty of 244% is applied on any consignment over $20 [£15].”

 

That meant Canadian customers who ordered a gift pack worth £50, including transport fees, were asked to pay £178 extra in duty when the courier arrived at their door, Spurrell said. “As you can imagine, customers were saying: ‘You can take that back, we don’t want it anymore’.”

Norwegian duty on a £30 cheese pack amounted to £190 extra, he said.

 

Spurrell is now pursuing the domestic market with greater vigour but says the cost of marketing has gone “through the roof” because all his competitors are having to do the same.

 

 

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3 hours ago, West 77 said:

This was discussed on Dragon's Den.

"...because you can't get French cheese" :?

 

 

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1 hour ago, The Joker said:

You are talking out of your backside.

 

Again.

 

Brexit is being credited with a big collapse in the British cheese industry.

 

One British cheesemaker says the lack of a trade deal has lost him  £250,000 of business due to the additional paperwork and health certificates required,  which requires a £180 health certificate on a £30 gift pack of cheese.

 

And as for so-called "emerging markets" including Canada and Norway, those counties' duties are in excess of 200%, amounting to £178 extra on a £50 gift pack, and £190 on a £30 gift pack.

 

Read it and weep:

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/dec/27/brexit-the-biggest-disaster-that-any-government-has-ever-negotiated

Brexit: ‘the biggest disaster any government has ever negotiated’

Exclusive: British cheesemaker says Brexit and subsequent trade deals have cost his firm £270,000


A British cheesemaker who predicted Brexit would cost him hundreds of thousands of pounds in exports has called the UK’s departure from the EU single market a disaster, after losing his entire wholesale and retail business in the bloc over the past year. Simon Spurrell, the co-founder of the Cheshire Cheese Company, said personal advice from a government minister to pursue non-EU markets to compensate for his losses had proved to be “an expensive joke”

 

It turns out our greatest competitor on the planet is the UK government because every time they do a fantastic deal, they kick us out of that market – starting with the Brexit deal,” he said.

 

Spurrell predicted in January that Brexit would cost him £250,000 in sales. “We lost £270,000, so I got one thing right,” he said, describing the post-Brexit EU trade deal as the “biggest disaster that any government has ever negotiated in the history of trade negotiations”.

 

His online retail business was hit immediately after the Brexit negotiator David Frost failed to secure a frictionless trade deal addressing sales to individual customers in the EU.

 

Spurrell said he had lost 20% of sales overnight after discovering he needed to provide a £180 health certificate on each order, including gift packs costing £25 or £30. He said the viability of his online retail had come to a “dead stop”.

 

After he embarked on a personal crusade to draw attention to the plight of UK exporters involving almost 200 media interviews around the world, he was invited to an online meeting with Victoria Prentis, a minister at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. She suggested that emerging markets could compensate for the Brexit-related hole in the Cheshire Cheese Company’s finances.

 

Spurrell said he had pursued new business in Norway and Canada but post-Brexit trade deals sealed by the government had put barriers in place.

“We no longer have any ability to deal with the EU as our three distributors in Germany, France and Italy have said we have become too expensive because of the new checks and paperwork.

 

“And now we’ve also lost Norway since the trade deal, as duty for wholesale is 273%. Then we tried Canada but what the government didn’t tell us is that duty of 244% is applied on any consignment over $20 [£15].”

 

That meant Canadian customers who ordered a gift pack worth £50, including transport fees, were asked to pay £178 extra in duty when the courier arrived at their door, Spurrell said. “As you can imagine, customers were saying: ‘You can take that back, we don’t want it anymore’.”

Norwegian duty on a £30 cheese pack amounted to £190 extra, he said.

 

Spurrell is now pursuing the domestic market with greater vigour but says the cost of marketing has gone “through the roof” because all his competitors are having to do the same.

 

 

Nonsense

 

1 hour ago, Magilla said:

"...because you can't get French cheese" :?

 

 

French cheese is still available but British cheese producers are benefiting in this pro Brexit age.   Brexit has brought new opportunities for all British business.

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I'm surprised people even bother replying to such an idiotic troll.

 

Hit the ignore button, it's what it's there for.

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3 hours ago, West 77 said:

French cheese is still available but British cheese producers are benefiting in this pro Brexit age.

"...because you can't get French cheese" was the claim made on Dragons Den :?

 

59 minutes ago, geared said:

I'm surprised people even bother replying to such an idiotic troll.

 

Hit the ignore button, it's what it's there for.

Hey, if they want to repeatedly make a complete arse of themselves... who am I to stop them :hihi:

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1 hour ago, geared said:

I'm surprised people even bother replying to such an idiotic troll.

 

Hit the ignore button, it's what it's there for.

Have you hit the ignore button for him ?

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Im confused, wernt Brextremists that are pro immigration restrictions hailing that we should be like Australia? and be tough on immigration?

 

Seems some...like farage are now moaning about the "big bad" Aussie government LOL

 

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5 hours ago, West 77 said:

Nonsense

 

French cheese is still available but British cheese producers are benefiting in this pro Brexit age.   Brexit has brought new opportunities for all British business.


Another rectally-derived comment from you.

 

British businesses have shrunk their potential market from the 300 million people of the EU, down to the 60 million people of the UK.

 

I fail to see how that could ever be construed as a benefit or an opportunity.

 

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