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Consequences Of Brexit [Part 9] Read First Post Before Posting

Vaati

Let me make this perfectly clear - any personal attacks will get you a suspension. The moderating team is not going to continually issue warnings. If you cannot remain civil and post within forum rules then do not bother to contribute.

 

In addition to remoaner we are also not going to allow the use of libdums or liebore - if you cannot behave like adults and post without recourse to these childish insults then please refrain from posting. If you have a problem with this then you all know where the helpdesk is. 

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6 hours ago, Tony said:

(…)

 

No, don't. Nord Stream 2 and EU/Russia relations are absolutely central.  You wanted to talk about the UK leaving the EU's energy market, so do it. 

Nord Stream 2 and EU/Russia relations are certainly relevant to the IEM, I have not suggested any differently.
 

But since the UK has left the IEM, whatever happens with/to the IEM is of no relevance to the UK - and reciprocally.

 

Practically, and pragmatically, the market situation translates as:

 

E_yKmUSVgAABml9?format=jpg&name=large

 

I’ve acknowledged that Brexit is only an aspect of the energy crisis/shock, as it is unfurling in the UK (it is also unfurling most everywhere else, of course).

 

After that, if you’re after a willy-waving contest about the UK’s resilience of energy supply vs that of the EU, I’m not interested: Brexit does not give the UK, or the EU27, any particular “advantage” one over the other, under the energy supply guarantees in the ‘oven ready’ TCA.

Edited by L00b

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@L00b that's electricity.

 

It's

a very good reference and very relevant though. It shows that the price problem is affecting everyone, not just the UK.

 

On the long term picture, if Germany exerts its fiscal muscle over the Euro while enabling NS2 we may we'll see a significant geopolitical shift eastwards to give Russian despots a massive lever over the EU.

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The price of gas is nothing to do with Brexit, (i voted remain) it's the same reason as to why the price of petrol has increased. If you're going to lose out on the sales of petrol/ gas then it's inevitable there's going to be a price increase. Don't forget hydrogen is going to replace gas in the near future.

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4 minutes ago, zaci said:

The price of gas is nothing to do with Brexit, (i voted remain) it's the same reason as to why the price of petrol has increased. If you're going to lose out on the sales of petrol/ gas then it's inevitable there's going to be a price increase. Don't forget hydrogen is going to replace gas in the near future.

Hmmm... :huh:


... I suppose that's when things will really start rising? :(

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14 minutes ago, El Cid said:

BP has warned it has had to "temporarily" close some of its petrol stations due to a shortage of lorry drivers.

Send in the Army?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-58645712

Why have you posted this information on this thread which has nothing to do with the shortage of lorry drivers?

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30 minutes ago, West 77 said:

Why have you posted this information on this thread which has nothing to do with the shortage of lorry drivers?

It does you know.

 

All the misdirection in the world won’t change that.


No matter how much bleating we get from leave voters. This is your mess.

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34 minutes ago, West 77 said:

Why have you posted this information on this thread which has nothing to do with the shortage of lorry drivers?

I thought you'd be happy, BP closing stations is stopping people's freedom of movement in their cars.

 

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4 minutes ago, tinfoilhat said:

I thought you'd be happy, BP closing stations is stopping people's freedom of movement in their cars.

 

Hmmm... :huh:


I thought that was the Council?... :confused:

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50 minutes ago, West 77 said:

Why have you posted this information on this thread which has nothing to do with the shortage of lorry drivers?

Quite right.

It should go on the shortage of Lorry drivers  thread.

Crops rotting in the fields should have it’s own thread,as should shortage of care home workers workers .Not to forget the shortage of ancillary hospital staff and the plight of the fishing industry.

Get the drift.

Dont mention B****t.

I nearly did but I think I got away with it.

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Supermarket shelves are slowly thinning in products but Northern Ireland shelves are full but then again they are still in the Single market which proves the benefits of been in trading block. 

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1 minute ago, RJRB said:

Quite right.

It should go on the shortage of Lorry drivers  thread.

Crops rotting in the fields should have it’s own thread,as should shortage of care home workers workers .Not to forget the shortage of ancillary hospital staff and the plight of the fishing industry.

Get the drift.

Dont mention B****t.

I nearly did but I think I got away with it.

Yes there should be a shortage of lorry drivers thread.  There is a shortage of lorry drivers in countries that haven't recently left the EU.  On one of the news channels yesterday they interviewed a real life self employed British lorry driver.  The lorry driver said over the last few years many lorry drivers have found alternative work because they felt treated badly due to low pay and not being appreciated for the hard work they do. The lorry driver said a few years ago it had to accept any job offered to him just to make a basic living.  The lorry driver said today his phone never stops ringing and he can afford to cherry pick which jobs he accepts to do.  The truth is there is a shortage of lorry drivers at the moment because for years they have been undervalued  and too many have left the industry as a consequence.  Nothing to do with Brexit.

8 minutes ago, GabrielC said:

Supermarket shelves are slowly thinning in products but Northern Ireland shelves are full but then again they are still in the Single market which proves the benefits of been in trading block. 

Unbelievable  logic.

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