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Consequences Of Brexit [Part 9] Read First Post Before Posting

Vaati

Let me make this perfectly clear - any personal attacks will get you a suspension. The moderating team is not going to continually issue warnings. If you cannot remain civil and post within forum rules then do not bother to contribute.

 

In addition to remoaner we are also not going to allow the use of libdums or liebore - if you cannot behave like adults and post without recourse to these childish insults then please refrain from posting. If you have a problem with this then you all know where the helpdesk is. 

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2 hours ago, melthebell said:

Checks from the EU postponed again

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-09-14/u-k-delays-brexit-border-checks-on-eu-goods-as-shortages-hit

 

now July 2022, our borders are still open (18 months after brexit "was done") and the EU has a competitive advantage over UK businesses?

 

well done brextremists

This is quite interesting but we need to take a step back and consider what's actually happening here.

 

As you say, the UK's borders for goods are quite porous right now. But what's the upshot of this,? What differences has is made? Why should we care?

 

Border checks seem to be few and far between as they always had been for trade with the rest of the world. ISTR that physical checks of extra-EU goods is around <5% so that container from Malawi has as much chance of being opened and audited as I have of fielding for Wednesday.  I haven't seen the numbers compared to the current imports from the EU but it seems reasonable to assume that they are similar. If anyone has accurate numbers I'd be interested to see. 

 

So if that's the case, what's the actual situation once we strip out the rhetoric? Basically, almost all inward goods from the EU and indeed the World come through on a trust basis because yes, business is essentially above board. It must be a good thing that we assume people are honest. The sky hasn't fallen in. The UK economy is booming under very trying circumstances.

 

So what's the point of the UK<>EU border controls if the EU>UK is working fine? Why shouldn't the UK>EU be dealt with in the same way? What's the EU's problem because if the above is correct it looks like the problem is the EU's protectionist approach to trade politics and it's not about the people who are actually doing business with each other. 

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24 minutes ago, Tony said:

This is quite interesting but we need to take a step back and consider what's actually happening here.

 

As you say, the UK's borders for goods are quite porous right now. But what's the upshot of this,? What differences has is made? Why should we care?

 

Border checks seem to be few and far between as they always had been for trade with the rest of the world. ISTR that physical checks of extra-EU goods is around <5% so that container from Malawi has as much chance of being opened and audited as I have of fielding for Wednesday.  I haven't seen the numbers compared to the current imports from the EU but it seems reasonable to assume that they are similar. If anyone has accurate numbers I'd be interested to see. 

 

So if that's the case, what's the actual situation once we strip out the rhetoric? Basically, almost all inward goods from the EU and indeed the World come through on a trust basis because yes, business is essentially above board. It must be a good thing that we assume people are honest. The sky hasn't fallen in. The UK economy is booming under very trying circumstances.

 

So what's the point of the UK<>EU border controls if the EU>UK is working fine? Why shouldn't the UK>EU be dealt with in the same way? What's the EU's problem because if the above is correct it looks like the problem is the EU's protectionist approach to trade politics and it's not about the people who are actually doing business with each other. 

An excellent fair contribution.

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13 minutes ago, Tony said:

So what's the point of the UK<>EU border controls if the EU>UK is working fine?

Not working at all isn't working fine! :?

 

How does the UK protect it's internal market if goods are allowed to flow in freely with little or no checks?

 

13 minutes ago, Tony said:

Why shouldn't the UK>EU be dealt with in the same way?

A better question would be why should it?

 

The UK allowed criminal gangs to flood Europe with cheap Chinese-made clothes:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/sep/09/uk-negligent-in-failure-to-stop-customs-says-senior-eu-lawyer

“failed to fulfil its obligations”

 

The EU has been up front about protecting the CU/SM from the outset, why should they risk undermining that to suit the UK's inability to get it's act together or even do what it signed up to do?

 

Then there's the inevitable divergence from standards that the trade deals the UK does with other third countries will involve.

 

13 minutes ago, Tony said:

What's the EU's problem because if the above is correct it looks like the problem is the EU's protectionist approach to trade politics and it's not about the people who are actually doing business with each other. 

The current UK government are basically unreliable, untrustworthy liars... a system based entirely on trust isn't going to fly.

 

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Just been in the co-op and there was no fresh food at all in the entire shop.

 

all fruit and vegetables, meat shelves etc just completely empty.

 

 Unbelievable situation we’ve got ourselves in.

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16 minutes ago, Magilla said:

Then there's the inevitable divergence from standards that the trade deals the UK does with other third countries will involve.

This is the crux of the matter. Arguing that we don't need border checks because our standards are aligned only works while the standards stay aligned. Brexiters, including government ministers, have repeatedly argued that we don't need border checks because our standards are aligned but also claim we should be able to unilaterally change our standards in the future without it having any effect on border checks. The EU and remainers aren't stupid enough to fall for that so it makes you wonder who they are aiming their arguments at.

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7 minutes ago, makapaka said:

Just been in the co-op and there was no fresh food at all in the entire shop.

 

all fruit and vegetables, meat shelves etc just completely empty.

 

 Unbelievable situation we’ve got ourselves in.

You need to get there much earlier.  As they say the early bird catches the worm.

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Just now, West 77 said:

You need to get there much earlier.  As they say the early bird catches the worm.

That's your response to empty shelves, get there a bit earlier? And those who can't, for a myriad of different reasons, they go without? WW2 spirit and all that usual Brexity jigoistic nonsense?

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3 minutes ago, West 77 said:

You need to get there much earlier.  As they say the early bird catches the worm.

That’s the way it is now folks.

 

From the mouth of an Brexit extremist .

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8 minutes ago, Bargepole23 said:

WW2 spirit and all that usual Brexity jigoistic nonsense?

Surely the WW2 spirit would mean rationing. Whilst that might enable more people to get (some) veg., I don't think even brexiters' wish to return to the past involves reintroducing rationing.

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43 minutes ago, West 77 said:

You need to get there much earlier.  As they say the early bird catches the worm.

maybe we could eat those instead?

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2 hours ago, makapaka said:

Just been in the co-op and there was no fresh food at all in the entire shop.

 

all fruit and vegetables, meat shelves etc just completely empty.

 

 Unbelievable situation we’ve got ourselves in.

You are lying. Sorry to be so blunt but your just post isn't credible.


 

 

@Magilla please take some time to read the post you responded to, understand it, and answer accordingly because your reply makes no sense. Thanks.

Edited by Tony

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Two things are undeniable.

Firstly it is obvious that supply chains have been disrupted and there are certainly gaps on shop shelves.

Secondly,prices are rising and will continue to do so.

Arguments may ensue as to the multitude of reasons for this ,but if barriers are erected to both the free flow of goods and services,and to the ability to employ foreign labour then the outcome is inevitable.

Some may argue that it’s a price worth paying.

To my mind it’s a self imposed burden,with no discernible up side.

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