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Consequences Of Brexit [Part 9] Read First Post Before Posting

Vaati

Let me make this perfectly clear - any personal attacks will get you a suspension. The moderating team is not going to continually issue warnings. If you cannot remain civil and post within forum rules then do not bother to contribute.

 

In addition to remoaner we are also not going to allow the use of libdums or liebore - if you cannot behave like adults and post without recourse to these childish insults then please refrain from posting. If you have a problem with this then you all know where the helpdesk is. 

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Coincidentally,just watching BBC report on movement within the Schengen area.

Many borders are up to prevent unnecessary movement,but lorries with essential supplies are fast tracked through between countries.

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19 minutes ago, RJRB said:

If you cannot see the benefit of the closest cooperation between communities and countries which I have always believed to be beneficial,but particularly so in the current circumstances then I can say little more.

As I have said previously some areas will recover before others and any friction to trade is detrimental.

I am not necessarily talking about the movement of physical goods,but also the closest cooperation with medics,scientists.throughout Europe and the world.

The Tory Party is sensibly having to abandon some of its normal core policies so who knows what is around the corner.

 

You can't seem to comprehend that Brexit has happened. We left the EU on 31st January.  Brexit doesn't mean the end of close cooperation  with medics, scientists etc throughout Europe and the World.  New trade agreements and  continuation of existing trade agreements are what is around the corner after the coronovirus crisis has been controlled.

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The FT has just reported that the cost by the UK government far outstrips other EU countries in supporting the economy with the measures announced.  We are spending 0.225 per cent of annual GDP per week.  That's £6bn!  To give you some context, the annual NHS bill is £140bn.  So the wage guarantee for just under half a year will match what we spend on the NHS.  Maxing out the country's credit card quite nicely.  The other EU governments haven't gone anywwhere near as far.  Wonder why.....

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40 minutes ago, Albert the Cat said:

The FT has just reported that the cost by the UK government far outstrips other EU countries in supporting the economy with the measures announced.  We are spending 0.225 per cent of annual GDP per week.  That's £6bn!  To give you some context, the annual NHS bill is £140bn.  So the wage guarantee for just under half a year will match what we spend on the NHS.  Maxing out the country's credit card quite nicely.  The other EU governments haven't gone anywwhere near as far.  Wonder why.....

There is no doubt it's going to take years to recover from the economic consequences of the coronavirus.  Our Government is doing what they believe is necessary to support our own economy. The other EU Governments make their own decisions based on their own individual circumstances.  Time will tell which countries recover faster economically after the coronavirus has been controlled. 

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24 minutes ago, RJRB said:

It's an interesting article for historical value, RJRB, but its 'rejoin' logic is premised entirely on the holding of a new 'Brejoin' referendum.

 

That is highly unlikely for a period of years (5) at the very earliest, and more likely the decade or two that it will take to switch the British political majority back towards a social democracy, after the current populist autocracy experiment fails.

Edited by L00b

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5 minutes ago, L00b said:

It's an interesting article for historical value, RJRB, but its 'rejoin' logic is premised entirely on the holding of a new 'Brejoin' referendum.

 

That is highly unlikely for a period of years (5) at the very earliest, and more likely the decade or two that it will take to switch the British political majority back towards a social democracy, after the current populist autocracy experiment fails.

All too true and the best that I can hope for is that the forthcoming deadlines and negotiations are tempered by current realities.

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8 hours ago, RJRB said:

Stated it  once before & I'll state it again, it's like dealing with Sisyphus. See post 241. 

 

Keep endlessly pushing that 2nd referendum boulder up that hill. 

Edited by Baron99

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And I repeat Pyrrhic Victory

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7 hours ago, RJRB said:

And I repeat Pyrrhic Victory

A win is a win, as far as the majority are concerned.  A majority win in the EU referendum, further backed up by a decisive General Election result where the electorate turned its back on those offering any 2nd EU referendum or revoking the whole lot in favour of staying in the EU.

 

Now let's forget about all this 2nd referendum nonsense & move on.  Really, people who are still going on about a referendum result that happened nearly 4 years ago, really do need refocus their perspective & channel their energy into something more worthwhile & productive. 

 

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I don’t think that there will be a second referendum.

What I do think is that current circumstances highlight the need for the closest cooperation between all countries is of paramount importance.

Anyone who cannot see that the go it alone jingoistic claptrap of the far right is detrimental to us all is stuck in a 4 year old time warp.

We are moving on but perhaps not as anticipated.

So the softest of Brexit and the closest of relationships.

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4 hours ago, Baron99 said:

A win is a win, as far as the majority are concerned.  A majority win in the EU referendum, further backed up by a decisive General Election result where the electorate turned its back on those offering any 2nd EU referendum or revoking the whole lot in favour of staying in the EU.

 

Now let's forget about all this 2nd referendum nonsense & move on.  Really, people who are still going on about a referendum result that happened nearly 4 years ago, really do need refocus their perspective & channel their energy into something more worthwhile & productive. 

 

I couldn't agree more.  

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