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Consequences Of Brexit [Part 9] Read First Post Before Posting

Vaati

Let me make this perfectly clear - any personal attacks will get you a suspension. The moderating team is not going to continually issue warnings. If you cannot remain civil and post within forum rules then do not bother to contribute.

 

In addition to remoaner we are also not going to allow the use of libdums or liebore - if you cannot behave like adults and post without recourse to these childish insults then please refrain from posting. If you have a problem with this then you all know where the helpdesk is. 

Message added by Vaati

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12 hours ago, West 77 said:

The article below implies the EU have been too slow to approve the use of the Pfizer vaccine.

The EU will be (one of?) the first authority (ies) to give full approval, no short-cuts taken.

 

it's a bit rich of the WSJ to criticise the EU, when the US used their own emergency process for approval.

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All this talk about the time taken by the EU to appraise the vaccine and give Pfizer its approval is really cute, considering the massive differential in infection and mortality rates between the UK and most of the EU27 countries. 

 

Given the fact that it has sod all to do with Brexit (save for the dumbo straw-manning of the past few pages), it's done a rather nice job of distracting from the elephant in the room: the operational update to the UK economy in 2 weeks' time, when the UK finds itself outside the CU and SM overnight and, in logistic terms, behind even Russia (long experienced with customs processing) and Turkey (in the CU).

 

A deal cannot solve that problem, now or next year, unless it brings the UK into the CU (which means, a BRINO deal).

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I get pretty fed up with the whole issue of point scoring between supposed representatives of different countries.

The only sensible way forward for the world population is cooperation and collaboration.

The Brexit movement has done a fine job in creating barriers and encouraging divisiveness.

We have the opportunities to learn from each other which is certainly the case in relation to all things Covid related from lock downs to vaccines.

Its a little early to say which approach will prove the better in any respect when comparing say the U.K.,Germany ,Sweden,Brazil,the US.

 

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https://www.ft.com/content/3df92ad6-9fd4-49aa-875e-640c1e2366d8

 

Are we going to get a sensible deal over the line.

I sincerely hope so because if the discussions over fishing rights really are the major outstanding issue then a compromise solution must be found.

There are plenty of noises from business leaders in both camps regarding the damage to economies,plus of course the continued warnings of our unpreparedness for the major transport and customs issues from Jan 1st.

As regards fishing  the much greater proportion of our catch goes into Europe.

Are Johnson and Macron prepared to reach a compromise which would enable a much wider deal in the greater interest.

Edited by RJRB

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When we joined the EEC in 1974, it was as it said on the tin - economic. As such, you can always negotiate with a businessman. When it rolled over (without any of its citizens having a vote...) into the EU it became a political union, and you can negotiate with a politician. However, it has now solidified as a totally bureaucratic organisation. You cannot negotiate with a bureaucrat - they say what the rules are, and that's it. Trying to negotiate with all the Barniers is futile. They have their position, you agree with it or no agreement. They will keep telling you to move, but never devaite themselves. I don't know why we keep talking. 

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10 hours ago, Cyclecar said:

When we joined the EEC in 1974, it was as it said on the tin - economic.

A nice story, but not true.

 

A central plank of the "No" campaign in the '75 referendum was that the UK would have to accept laws drafted in Europe, warning that the Common Market "sets out by stages to merge Britain with France, Germany, Italy and other countries into a single nation," in which Britain would be a "mere province".

 

The "Yes" campaign openly acknowledged that being a member of the EEC involved "pooling" sovereignty with the eight other nations who were members at the time.

 

When we joined the EEC, no-one was under any illusion that the EEC was an economic AND political construct...

 

...unless they weren't paying attention :?

 

Edited by Magilla

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11 minutes ago, Magilla said:

A central plank of the "No" campaign in the '75 referendum was that the UK would have to accept laws drafted in Europe, warning that the Common Market "sets out by stages to merge Britain with France, Germany, Italy and other countries into a single nation," in which Britain would be a "mere province".

 

The "Yes" campaign openly acknowledged that being a member of the EEC involved "pooling" sovereignty with the eight other nations who were members at the time.

 

When we joined the EEC, no-one was under any illusion that the EEC was an economic AND political construct...

 

...unless they weren't paying attention :?

 

I was - which is why I voted 'No' in the fiddled referendum around that time, and why I have never changed my mind.😆

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14 hours ago, Cyclecar said:

When we joined the EEC in 1974, it was as it said on the tin - economic. As such, you can always negotiate with a businessman. When it rolled over (without any of its citizens having a vote...) into the EU it became a political union, and you can negotiate with a politician. However, it has now solidified as a totally bureaucratic organisation. You cannot negotiate with a bureaucrat - they say what the rules are, and that's it. Trying to negotiate with all the Barniers is futile. They have their position, you agree with it or no agreement. They will keep telling you to move, but never devaite themselves. I don't know why we keep talking. 

Simplistic and quite uninformed nonsense. 

 

Free history lesson from a LSE professor

Edited by L00b

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Wasn't one of reasons given for Brexit the ability to control our borders, that we couldn't do in the EU?

 

Perhaps the lorry drivers stuck in Kent would like to know that France can't control its borders as it's part of the EU? 

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25 minutes ago, whiteowl said:

Wasn't one of reasons given for Brexit the ability to control our borders, that we couldn't do in the EU?

 

Perhaps the lorry drivers stuck in Kent would like to know that France can't control its borders as it's part of the EU? 

Who knew that borders had two sides?

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Nigel Farage is now complaining that the border between the UK and France is closed! I mean, I knew he was not the brightest, but this is quite unbelievable. It's what you wanted for heaven's sake! Let's see how self-sufficient we are now then. Fish for breakfast, dinner and tea I guess.

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1 hour ago, Delbow said:

Nigel Farage is now complaining that the border between the UK and France is closed! I mean, I knew he was not the brightest, but this is quite unbelievable. It's what you wanted for heaven's sake! Let's see how self-sufficient we are now then. Fish for breakfast, dinner and tea I guess.

I noticed that MPs John Redwood and Andrew Bridgen were making the same points as well.

Nigel Farage Is Angry That France Has Taken Control Of Its Borders | HuffPost UK (huffingtonpost.co.uk)

Gormless gammons

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