Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Restart Duration On Win10.

Recommended Posts

On Win10, why does restart take  longer  than simply shutting  down, then turning on again ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could also be installing an update or two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are as fast as each other for me, honestly....

Are you running on an SSD?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It all depends on if it's a basic restart, or if it's downloaded updates etc. I have noticed HDD errors in the past that can seriously slow down boot or restarts.

 

I don't normally notice much, if any. I can't say I've ever timed them as my PCs tend to have RAID cards so quick booting/restarts are not something I watch for.

 

What's your reason to ask, getting slow restarts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you hold down the shift key and press shutdown it will do a full shutdown of the computer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, zach said:

What's your reason to ask, getting slow restarts

There is no recognisable problem with booting per se.

I asked because I certainly noticed that restarting after an install takes considerably longer than a normal boot. Until it was explained on this thread I did not know why.

 I downloaded an update for Adobe yesterday and this prompted my question. I have invariably just shut down after an update, assuming (wrongly ?) that any  installs will happen at next boot up.

In future, I should perhaps restart after installs.

 

@Ghozer

I am not sure what type the  orginal C drive is, but it is quite small in size. I also put a hdd in that I  removed from my old xp, and it's much larger in physical size  (it's from 2006). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Janus said:

 

@Ghozer

I am not sure what type the  orginal C drive is, but it is quite small in size. I also put a hdd in that I  removed from my old xp, and it's much larger in physical size  (it's from 2006). 

This could be the problem, mechanical drives are slow any way, plus you said you put one from your old XP machine in also, that will be even older, and even slower....

get a nice new SSD in there, keep your current drive(s) for archive purposes etc, the system will be much better :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Janus said:

There is no recognisable problem with booting per se.

I asked because I certainly noticed that restarting after an install takes considerably longer than a normal boot. Until it was explained on this thread I did not know why.

 I downloaded an update for Adobe yesterday and this prompted my question. I have invariably just shut down after an update, assuming (wrongly ?) that any  installs will happen at next boot up.

In future, I should perhaps restart after installs.

 

@Ghozer

I am not sure what type the  orginal C drive is, but it is quite small in size. I also put a hdd in that I  removed from my old xp, and it's much larger in physical size  (it's from 2006). 

It sounds like things are OK. I'm a bit old school and tend to reboot after System/Program/Driver updates.

 

Hard drives are fairly standard in size. nVME are some of the smallest, with a common size being just 22 x 80 mm. The other two common size hard drives are 2.5" & 3.5", the 2.5" are mainly found in laptops but also a very common size for SATA- SSDs in either laptops or desktops. The 3.5" is mainly desktop & external use but capacity can be over 14TB on a single drive. The list goes on and on but the above covers the basics.

 

A free program that will tell you about your hard drives is CrystalDisk Info ( I think it's Windows only) I've not used it for a while so there may be a newer option to check them. If they all report a spindle speed, I agree 100% with the above, treat yourself to an SSD for the system drive.

Edited by zach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 17/01/2020 at 16:53, Ghozer said:

This could be the problem, mechanical drives are slow any way, plus you said you put one from your old XP machine in also, that will be even older, and even slower....

get a nice new SSD in there, keep your current drive(s) for archive purposes etc, the system will be much better :)

Probably the best upgrade for almost any machine, every pc I have stuck an SSD in has come alive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.