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Iron Rust

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My iron is used every week or so. But why does its otherwise shiny face rust?

It's hot when in use (obviously) and does not become damp. I know that exposure to damp causes steel to rust but I'd assume that an iron features stainless steel. What don't I know about it? And how might I stop it from happening? Your sensible suggestions welcome!

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Are you sure it's  rust? Mines brown in the centre by maybe getting too hot or by myself melting something nylon. I usually brighten it up with a scouring  pan when it's  gone cool, but an iron shouldn't  rust.

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A funny subject Iron's.

 

My EX used to go through an Iron every 3 or 4 months! ( not to mention a vacuum cleaner every 6 months too.!)

 

Iv'e had my current Iron (Morphy Richards) for 15 years and it still perfect. (I look after my appliances,. I guess it's a bloke thing!!)

 

Modern Irons have an Aluminium base plate and some newer ones have Ceramic.

 

I'ts NOT rust. It's more to do with the WATER that you are putting into it and how YOU are USING it.

 

Using it on a too high setting for the material you are ironing can result in 'Browning'.

 

Make sure you only use Fresh clean water, keep the jets clear, and don't use it on the high setting for too long.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To remove the browning on an irons face plate, plug it in on hot and rub the area with a Paracetamol but don’t burn your fingers. It works.

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The faceplates of most irons nowadays are either stainless or ceramic, the former I would think is a non-rusting grade (some grades do develop a light film of rust in salty water).

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The only way rust forms on stainless steel is during  manufacture the steel is burnt and the molecules are rearranged and any saline solution, salty water, will cause rust. That’s the reason on some cheap imported kitchen knives show spots of rust after a few weeks of use because the blades were scorched during the grinding process and once the rust starts it cannot be stopped.

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12 hours ago, lazarus said:

To remove the browning on an irons face plate, plug it in on hot and rub the area with a Paracetamol but don’t burn your fingers. It works.

It really does, I've never found anything else as good.  I'm wondering if some upset tummy tablets might do the job too as paracetamol are too small for my sausage fingers!

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You can get wax sticks that you apply to the plate warm which remove any residue. Use a cotton bud to clear out the jets. It works incredibly well but makes a really horrible vapour so only do it near a wide open window!

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19 hours ago, lazarus said:

To remove the browning on an irons face plate, plug it in on hot and rub the area with a Paracetamol but don’t burn your fingers. It works.

If you do accidentally burn your fingers, swallow the paracetamol.

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Thank you to all respondents. It does seem to be rust, not just browning. The iron started-off OK; the patches appeared after two or three bouts of use.

Paracetamol, eh? I'll try it anyway and report back.

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2 hours ago, Jeffrey Shaw said:

Paracetamol, eh? I'll try it anyway and report back.

....and don’t stroke the cat without washing your hands first, it’s poisonous to cats !

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