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A Forgotten Victim Of A 'terror Attack'


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Sherbini, a pharmacist who was four months' pregnant and wore the Islamic head scarf, was involved in a court case against her neighbour after he called her a terrorist. She was due to testify when he stabbed her 18 times inside the courtroom in front of her three-year-old son.

The woman's husband was critically wounded in the attack, after he tried to intervene and was stabbed by the attacker and accidentally shot by court security.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/world/2009/jul/07/muslim-woman-shot-germany-court

So the reason I bring this up now is because of how the London Bridge murders are being reported.

I chose the Dresden example because it took place in a courtroom, of all places. Furthermore the security shot her husband who was trying to defend her, rather than the terrorist. However, it seems that the attacker was not a terrorist, in fact I haven't come across a single anti Muslim hate crime being reported as terrorism in the mainstream media. This is only one of many attacks on Muslim women motivated by an evil ideology. Just type "Muslim woman attacked" into google, you will find case after case. So why aren't these attacks being reported as "terror attacks". Your thoughts? 

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I'd never heard of this incident.  It is truly horrific and abominable.  I trust if it had happened in the UK then it would have featured widely in UK news programmes.  

 

I'm not sure I can answer your question.  I certainly think that the UK media are more hesitant to describe breaking incidents as acts of terrorism, until they have a greater picture of the facts.  I'm not sure whether that is due to government directives or not.

 

Certainly, we hear reports of terrorism coming from right-wing persons/groups, like the terrible events in New Zealand, so I don't think anyone is any doubt that attacks on Muslims and mosques happen, and are called out as acts of terrorism.

 

The example you cite poses lots of questions.  I don't know what constitutes an act of terrorism, in legal terms.  I see daily reports on the news from around the world, that I personally view as acts of terror, but are not described in terms of 'terrorism'.

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10 hours ago, Bounce said:

Sherbini, a pharmacist who was four months' pregnant and wore the Islamic head scarf, was involved in a court case against her neighbour after he called her a terrorist. She was due to testify when he stabbed her 18 times inside the courtroom in front of her three-year-old son.

The woman's husband was critically wounded in the attack, after he tried to intervene and was stabbed by the attacker and accidentally shot by court security.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/world/2009/jul/07/muslim-woman-shot-germany-court

So the reason I bring this up now is because of how the London Bridge murders are being reported.

I chose the Dresden example because it took place in a courtroom, of all places. Furthermore the security shot her husband who was trying to defend her, rather than the terrorist. However, it seems that the attacker was not a terrorist, in fact I haven't come across a single anti Muslim hate crime being reported as terrorism in the mainstream media. This is only one of many attacks on Muslim women motivated by an evil ideology. Just type "Muslim woman attacked" into google, you will find case after case. So why aren't these attacks being reported as "terror attacks". Your thoughts? 

 

Referrals to Prevent strategy in UK have a high proportion of extrême right groups and individuals. Probably the same people who label Corbyn a " terrorist sympathiser" 

 

Quite Orwellian at the moment

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19 hours ago, Bounce said:

Sherbini, a pharmacist who was four months' pregnant and wore the Islamic head scarf, was involved in a court case against her neighbour after he called her a terrorist. She was due to testify when he stabbed her 18 times inside the courtroom in front of her three-year-old son.

The woman's husband was critically wounded in the attack, after he tried to intervene and was stabbed by the attacker and accidentally shot by court security.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/world/2009/jul/07/muslim-woman-shot-germany-court

So the reason I bring this up now is because of how the London Bridge murders are being reported.

I chose the Dresden example because it took place in a courtroom, of all places. Furthermore the security shot her husband who was trying to defend her, rather than the terrorist. However, it seems that the attacker was not a terrorist, in fact I haven't come across a single anti Muslim hate crime being reported as terrorism in the mainstream media. This is only one of many attacks on Muslim women motivated by an evil ideology. Just type "Muslim woman attacked" into google, you will find case after case. So why aren't these attacks being reported as "terror attacks". Your thoughts? 

 

In the UK, terrorism is defined as the use or threat of action which is designed to influence the government or intimidate the public or a section of the public, and is made for the purpose of advancing a political, religious, racial or ideological cause.

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21 hours ago, Bounce said:

I haven't come across a single anti Muslim hate crime being reported as terrorism in the mainstream media. 

I remember one case that was reported as a terrorist act. The  'lone wolf' bloke who drove his van in to a group of Muslims.  I think one of the elderly men in the group was killed. The Imam  amongst them stopped the others from lynching the van driver, which was honourable under the circumstances.

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