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General Election 12 December.

nikki-red

This is NOT to become a second Brexit thread.

Thank you.

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Judging by tonight's Question Time, the penny is finally beginning to drop that the Conservatives are no longer the party 'Born to Rule.'

They are beginning to realise that the electorate is now better informed about the machinations of politicians and will no longer fall unquestioningly for their corruption, lies and spin.   

Edited by Anna B

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38 minutes ago, makapaka said:

The tories;

 

prime minister elected without a majority and forms a coalition.

prime minister instigates a referendum to leave the eu which he personally disagrees with.

prime minister resigns cos he loses referendum he disagrees with.

prime minister is elected without general election and triggers article 50 setting clock ticking on leaving EU.

prime minister triggers general election and loses majority and has to enter pact with small party of NI politicians to form government.
prime minister fails to achieve majority to support deal to leave EU and resigns.

prime minister is elected without general election and is found to have misled queen and unlawfully prorogued parliament.

primer minister calls general election.................

 

if you can still choose to vote for this party - even on this one issue - and putting aside bedroom tax, universal credit and all the rest - then there is no hope for any of us.

You don't seem to realise that prime ministers are elected by their party regardless of whether a GE takes place or not. The person who leads the party is chosen as PM and general elections have no part to play in that.

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53 minutes ago, apelike said:

You don't seem to realise that prime ministers are elected by their party regardless of whether a GE takes place or not. The person who leads the party is chosen as PM and general elections have no part to play in that.

Liz Savill Roberts (Question Time) made the very good point that our antiquated system is no longer fit for purpose and needs a massive overhaul.

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11 hours ago, hobinfoot said:

The reason they are not is probably due to the purdah rules being followed correctly.

The rules linked by CaptainSwing yesterday (post #408, 'Guidelines' link in the text: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/844380/General_Election_Guidance_2019.pdf) do not contain any provision allowing the Prime Minister to withhold a Select Committee report.

 

Rather, section D paragraph 3 of these Guidelines maintain the Committee Clerk post-dissolution, together with his attributions, including to publish, during purdah, a Select Committee report already approved for publication by that Select Committee prior to Parliament dissolution.

 

Now unless I am mistaken, the report under discussion was approved for publication prior to the purdah period. Johnson has just sat on it since for the sake of 'redaction', and so is acting beyond his powers (an opinion shared by quite a few British constitutional lawyers).

 

Oh, and Purdah is a not 'a curtain'. What's the matter, are you embarassed about the cultural provenance of the word? 

Edited by L00b

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9 hours ago, apelike said:

You don't seem to realise that prime ministers are elected by their party regardless of whether a GE takes place or not. The person who leads the party is chosen as PM and general elections have no part to play in that.

I do realise that.

 

any comment on the main points?

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1 hour ago, L00b said:

Oh, and Purdah is a not 'a curtain'. What's the matter, are you embarassed about the cultural provenance of the word? 

Quote

The word ‘purdah’ is derived from the Persian word which means ‘veil’ or ‘curtain’ and describes the practice of women being kept hidden from men either through clothing or physical boundaries like curtains.

 

As such, the term has been described by some as sexist, with Harini Iyengar of the Women’s Equality Party tweeting: ‘I don’t use “purdah” to describe the “pre-election period” because it’s sexist & offensive.

 

‘Purdah was a tradition in Middle East & South Asia which required upper-class women to be physically secluded, kept out of sight & took away their human rights. The Taliban supported it.’


Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2019/11/06/political-purdah-start-finish-11049700

 

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Boris will reinstate local railway lines that were scrapped by Dr Beeching in the 60s and has pledged £500 million to reopen them starting with the north of England. I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

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1 hour ago, Sidonica said:

Boris will reinstate local railway lines that were scrapped by Dr Beeching in the 60s and has pledged £500 million to reopen them starting with the north of England. I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

£500 million.  When HS2 alone costs £88 billion? 

 

I can't see £500 million going far.

 

Costs found from a rail report:
 

• Reopening a single track railway – open line £4.5m per mile

• Single platform terminus station £2.5m

• Double track terminus station £5m

 

The Borders railway:

 

The borders railway has recently reopened running from Edinburgh to Tweedbank. The line is predominantly single track, but with passing loops including some of substantial length (dynamic loops) so trains can pass without stopping. The line covers the following:

 

• Length 31 miles, 9 ½ miles of which is double track arranged as 3 dynamic loops

• 42 new bridges and 95 refurbished bridges (the line runs over a large number of bridges)

• 2 refurbished tunnels

• 7 stations

• Total cost £350m – approximately £11m per mile for all infrastructure including stations

Edited by alchresearch

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3 hours ago, makapaka said:

I do realise that.

 

any comment on the main points?

What points? 

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I think our politicians are overwhelmed by the enormity of the tasks in hand and create smokescreens to get by on a day to day basis.

Boris’s rail plans and Corbyn ‘s free broadband make headlines but hardly figure on most people’s agenda.

First and foremost Brexit must be achieved or binned.

If we do get a WA everyone should be aware that this is only the start of the process and I believe those who say that our economy will take a hit for the foreseeable future.

I have long wished that our major parties would find some common ground on major policies so that there is some continuity irrespective of who is in power.

The first in line should be a firm policy on the funding of the NHS where both parties state their wholehearted support,but continue to use it as a battleground.

Regrettably we have the most damaging polarisation of opinions at the moment so I am not holding my breath.

I am heartily sick of the type of confrontational party politics that we have to endure.

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1 hour ago, RJRB said:

I think our politicians are overwhelmed by the enormity of the tasks in hand and create smokescreens to get by on a day to day basis.

Boris’s rail plans and Corbyn ‘s free broadband make headlines but hardly figure on most people’s agenda.

First and foremost Brexit must be achieved or binned.

If we do get a WA everyone should be aware that this is only the start of the process and I believe those who say that our economy will take a hit for the foreseeable future.

I have long wished that our major parties would find some common ground on major policies so that there is some continuity irrespective of who is in power.

The first in line should be a firm policy on the funding of the NHS where both parties state their wholehearted support,but continue to use it as a battleground.

Regrettably we have the most damaging polarisation of opinions at the moment so I am not holding my breath.

I am heartily sick of the type of confrontational party politics that we have to endure.

Indeed. And if politicians had the best interests of the country at heart it should be possible for them to work together. But as brexit has shown when people of whatever party are diametrically opposed it's very difficult to get a satisfactory agreement.

 

To my mind the problem is that our political system is designed to be oppositional and needs reform. 

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9 hours ago, L00b said:

The rules linked by CaptainSwing yesterday (post #408, 'Guidelines' link in the text: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/844380/General_Election_Guidance_2019.pdf) do not contain any provision allowing the Prime Minister to withhold a Select Committee report.

 

Rather, section D paragraph 3 of these Guidelines maintain the Committee Clerk post-dissolution, together with his attributions, including to publish, during purdah, a Select Committee report already approved for publication by that Select Committee prior to Parliament dissolution.

 

Now unless I am mistaken, the report under discussion was approved for publication prior to the purdah period. Johnson has just sat on it since for the sake of 'redaction', and so is acting beyond his powers (an opinion shared by quite a few British constitutional lawyers).

 

Oh, and Purdah is a not 'a curtain'. What's the matter, are you embarassed about the cultural provenance of the word? 

noun.

the practice in some Muslim and Hindu societies of screening women from men or strangers especially by the means of a curtain.

Edited by hobinfoot

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