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Electric Cars, Anyone Got One?

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7 minutes ago, tinfoilhat said:

Those people are stupid. Really really stupid. You have a visual guide and sometimes an audible reminder as well. If you run out of petrol more than once a year you should be forced to hand in your licence. Get a bus. oesnt 

Yes agreed but they still do it my wife doesnt know were to put petrol in or blow tyres up . I asked her last week what a dustcap  was she didnt know bet yours doesnt either .

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3 minutes ago, spider1 said:

Yes you dont get it . It takes 5 mins to fill a petrol car prob 50 mins to put a decent ammount elec in

This is 10 x as long so 10 times as many charging points thats 10 cars stood there for an hour and 50 stood on road waiting to get in. Have you ever been to   put petrol in and there has been 3 cars in front of you waiting to fill up and all gone in 10 mins . well now there s be 30 cars waiting unless they put 12 more charging points in and they cant do that as garage not big enough .

Or do it at home the night before (you cant fill up a petrol car at home), or 50 mins before in the morning. It's the teeny tiniest bit of advanced planning. 

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Just now, spider1 said:

Yes agreed but they still do it my wife doesnt know were to put petrol in or blow tyres up . I asked her last week what a dustcap  was she didnt know bet yours doesnt either .

I think youd be surprised.

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44 minutes ago, ads36 said:

or, stop every couple of hour

it's only a minor change in behaviour. and this is only an issue if driving cross-country, where you'd need to recharge.

 

now : stop at a service station, have a pee, wait while everyone else decides they need to go, someone wants a coffee, someone buys a sandwich, etc. go and fill up the car.

 

(yes, the filling-up bit only took a few minutes, but all-in, you've been stopped for 45mins)

 

electric cars : stop, plug the car in, go and faff about just like you used to, go back and unplug the car.

 

there's not really much in it.

 

Unfortunately there is.

There's only a certain number of times you can fast charge a battery on one trip, they start to overheat and default to long & slow charge.

 

Most EV owners recommend re-charging when you're at 1/3 to 1/4 battery left, and when your 'real word' range might actually only be 100 miles total you're looking at stopping every 60-70 miles.

 

End result is a long journey might still not be possible.

 

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Was looking at a review for MG's electric car, I think it said MG was matching the Government's £3500.

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Ah, all the range anxiety and misinformation you'd expect on a general forum in a post about electric cars have already appeared I see.

 

Range anxiety is an illusion upheld due to poor rule making and investment in this country. Most of Europe is miles ahead in electric car infrastructure.

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32 minutes ago, tzijlstra said:

Ah, all the range anxiety and misinformation you'd expect on a general forum in a post about electric cars have already appeared I see.

 

Range anxiety is an illusion upheld due to poor rule making and investment in this country. Most of Europe is miles ahead in electric car infrastructure.

Theres a surprise (on both counts).

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26 minutes ago, tzijlstra said:

Ah, all the range anxiety and misinformation you'd expect on a general forum in a post about electric cars have already appeared I see.

 

Range anxiety is an illusion upheld due to poor rule making and investment in this country. Most of Europe is miles ahead in electric car infrastructure.

How do they manage with regards to people who don't have a parking space (and thus nowhere to put a charger) at home? Or those who live in a block of flats and don't have the ability to put a charger in, even if they do have a space for the car?

 

We'll definitely be going down the plug-in hybrid route for our next car but we're lucky enough to have space to sort out our own charger at home, it'd be a bit different if we couldn't.

 

My dad got a Kia Niro plug-in hybrid several months ago and loves it, does all his general drives on electric but still has the petrol for occasional longer journeys.

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On 27/10/2019 at 11:16, blackydog said:

Hybrids only use electric at very low speeds. Majority are Toyotas, which don't drive great due to the CVT transmission...

This isn't really the case any more, there are quite a few options and they can use electric up to pretty decent speeds nowadays. Obviously doesn't last as long but still.

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27 minutes ago, vwkittie said:

How do they manage with regards to people who don't have a parking space (and thus nowhere to put a charger) at home? Or those who live in a block of flats and don't have the ability to put a charger in, even if they do have a space for the car?

Public charging most likely?

 

I don't know on the continent, but here some of the public chargers can run as much as 50p/ kWh for the juice, although in the 30p range is more common with the larger networks.

 

rapid-cost-comparison-7439c6b9.jpg

Edited by geared

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3 hours ago, geared said:

Public charging most likely?

 

I don't know on the continent, but here some of the public chargers can run as much as 50p/ kWh for the juice, although in the 30p range is more common with the larger networks.

 

rapid-cost-comparison-7439c6b9.jpg

When we got our Mitsubishi Overlander PHEV,  4+ years ago all you had to do was apply to charging point company's for a charging card which was a tenner and it was used until we got rid 3 years later. We had three different cards, just to try to ensure we were covered to charge at different places who had different chargers installed.

 

For the electric fanatics I'll make this as short as I can. The PHEV cost more to run than a good diesel, and that was with basically free electric @ £10 for 3 years. We used to talk about what would happen if the Government reduced the subsidy's and allowed the charging company's to charge at the charging points. Now it has happened.

 

Our PHEV NEVER ever got near to 30 miles per charge, 20/25 was an average. At to-days charging price, £6 for a charge (only up to 80%) because fast charging can damage the battery, especially if it was allowed to ram in the last 20%, so 80% is the max. So our PHEV did 23 miles on a FULL  charge, but at 80%  it would do, say 19 miles to the charge for £6. We have just done 1400 miles in Scotland with our diesel Seat and averaged 44 miles per gallon. As an hybrid the PHEV did 30 max mpg on its 2 litre petrol engine.

 

So, PHEV @ £6  for 19 miles on electric, then Petrol @ 30 mpg  V  Seat diesel @ £6.50 for 44 miles. It's a no brainer which is the cheapest to run on a day to day basis. Big downside to Electric, replacement battery for PHEV  @ £5 thousand according to the salesman.

 

Just to add, the Outlander is a brilliant car, we just made the mistake of believing the 156 mpg hype, we should have gone for the Outlander diesel.

 

Angel1.

Edited by ANGELFIRE1

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Or, in other words, you completely misunderstood the point of a plug-in hybrid?

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